Washington, DC


Photos by Phil Yabut

Thanks to Phil for sending. From the Supreme Court:

“Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court of the United States on Wednesday, September 23, and Thursday, September 24. The casket will arrive in front of the Court just before 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday. A private ceremony will take place in the Great Hall at 9:30 a.m. attended by Justice Ginsburg’s family, close friends, and members of the Court. Following the private ceremony inside, Justice Ginsburg will lie in repose under the Portico at the top of the front steps of the Building to allow for public viewing outdoors.

Former law clerks to Justice Ginsburg will serve as honorary pallbearers and will line the front steps as the casket arrives. Supreme Court police officers will serve as pallbearers. The Justices will remain inside the Great Hall where the casket will be placed on the Lincoln Catafalque, which has been loaned to the Court by the U.S. Congress for the ceremony. A 2016 portrait of Justice Ginsburg by Constance P. Beaty will be on display in the Great Hall.

The public is invited to pay respects in front of the Building from approximately 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. on Wednesday, September 23, and from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m. on Thursday, September 24.

A private interment service will be held next week at Arlington National Cemetery.”

And preserving for posterity some of the many, many tributes to RBG prior to removal: Read More

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Photos and words by @Pharipedia. Phari is one of my favorite photographers who contributes to our Instagram. He’s volunteered to share a bit more with us from his adventures around town. Phari lives on Capitol Hill.

“Through much of the 19th century and the early 20th century, Washington DC experienced a boom in alley dwellings. While the real estate developers were designing and constructing impressive homes for the wealthier residents, they were building much smaller structures in back alleyways with mostly no running water or electricity. As the city’s population rose, the poor and working-class people began living in these dwellings in large numbers. With a majority Black population, these alleyway neighborhoods created tightly-knit communities. Read More

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From the Mayor’s Office:

“Today, Mayor Muriel Bowser and the DC Office of Planning (OP) launched a survey to receive community feedback on public life and activity in and around the intersection of 14th and U Streets, NW, in the heart of the U Street corridor in Ward 1. OP is seeking public feedback on ways to better preserve or improve the public spaces around this intersection and how the District can work together to enhance the types of activities that take place there. Read More

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“Dear PoPville,

Question for you/popville: what’s chicken bacon ranch pizza guy up to? Hope he’s doing alright and eating all the CBR he has ever hoped for.”

Ask and ye shall receive:

“Hey, guys. It’s me — Chicken Bacon Ranch guy.

Surely you remember, five years ago, when hundreds of this blog’s commenters chewed me up and spat me out like a chicken ranch slice with no bacon on it. A few of you came to my aid, but most of you were hungry for my blood. I was hungry only for Chicken Bacon Ranch.

You called me a “dunce,” “an asshat,” and an “over-entitled d-bag.” You insulted my home state, saying I was a “typical mouthy New Yorker,” and that I should go back there (I didn’t). Thank god I’m anonymous.

I doubt anyone needs a recap of what happened, but if you moved here pre-Trump, you might not understand the regularunending references made to me and my favorite pizza. For those of you not familiar with the events that led us here, I’ll sum it up more briefly than I did in 2015: Read More

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Photos and words by @Pharipedia. Phari is one of my favorite photographers who contributes to our Instagram. He’s volunteered to share a bit more with us from his adventures around town. Phari lives on Capitol Hill.

Phari writes:

“This beautiful Italianate-style house in the Capitol Hill neighborhood was once the home of Fredrick Douglas. The abolitionist, suffragist, orator, author, and statesman purchased this house when he first moved to Washington, DC in 1871. Douglas lived at 316 A. Street, NE until 1877, before moving across the river to the Anacostia neighborhood and the “Cedar Hill” house which is now a National Historic Site. Read More

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Read the DC-FACES-Executive-Summary (PDF) here.

From the Mayor’s Office:

“Today, Mayor Muriel Bowser released the District of Columbia Facilities and Commemorative Expressions Working Group (DCFACES) report. In July 2020, the Mayor assembled the working group with the charge of reviewing the legacy of namesakes of District assets to determine if the individual, in an individual capacity or as part of a group, participated in the oppression of African Americans and/or other communities of color, or contributed to the nation’s history of systemic racism and other biases. Read More

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“Dear PoPville,

I spotted this marker in Mt Olivet Cemetery not long ago. A quick google search for Henry Wirz revealed that he didn’t just die in 1865, he was executed in 1865 for running the notorious Andersonville Prison Camp. It threw me that someone who was executed by the Government of the United States for war crimes would get such a laudatory marker. Then again, in light of all that has been written recently about the Daughters of the Confederacy’s penchant for monuments that rewrite history, maybe this should not have shocked me. I’m curious if this particular monument has come under scrutiny before.”

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From a press release:

“On Saturday, August 22, 2020, the Bowser Administration and the DC Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), in conjunction with the DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music & Entertainment (OCTFME), will celebrate the late Go-Go legend Chuck Brown’s birthday with the 6th Annual Chuck Brown Day virtually. The event celebrates the Godfather of Go-Go and the rich, original musical history of the District.  Read More

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