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by Prince Of Petworth December 15, 2017 at 12:45 pm 0

Dan Silverman: Citizen of the District of Columbia. Photo by Hugh Clarke

So as most people know by now Wawa opened their first D.C. location yesterday and there was a massive turnout. And there was a massive, predictable, “I don’t get it” counter-reaction. And the even more predictable – “it’s just gas station food.” But what pushed me over the edge was a twitter response from someone reacting to Jessica Sidman’s viral photo of the huge line inside:

“This is why DC is the worst city in the world, these hipsters think Wawa is some kind of authentic poor people thing and they want to be a part of it.”

No, no, no. NO. First of all we’re not even the worst city in the mid-Atlantic. Second of all look at the God damned photos – these people are not hipsters. If anything they are the opposite of hipsters. And third of all “authentic poor people thing”? What? Anyway it got me thinking how the anti reaction to anything popular in D.C. is so reflexive these days. Can we not just be happy for whatever reason for one half second?

People excited about a Nordstrom Rack opening? “You bastards, don’t you realize all that clothing is made in China.” Excited about a Sweetgreen opening? “You stupid lettuce fetishist – don’t you realize they are a chain now?” Excited about a Christmas pop up bar? (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 7, 2017 at 2:15 pm 0

Photo by PoPville flickr user Pablo Raw

The following was written by by Robert Robinson Chair, DC Consumer Utility Board. PoP-Ed. posts may be written about anything related to the District and submitted via email to princeofpetworth(at)gmail please include PoP-Ed. in the subject line.

Ed. Note: DC Water has tweeted: “Each of our customers pays the Impervious Area Charge (IAC) on their bill. Here’s the history behind it.”

“For years DC’s Combined Water and Sewer (CSS) system spewed sewerage into the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers and Rock Creek during heavy storms or snowmelts.

For years, beginning in the 1980s, my DC water bills informed me that I was paying charges to replace the CSS.

I doubt that any of that work was done before 2005.

Now there’s hell to pay.

Low-, middle-, and fixed-income families, senior citizens, churches and nonprofit organizations, and small businesses are paying the lion’s share of the clean-up costs–with ever-rising water bills.

So, kudos to NBC4 Investigative Reporter Jodie Fleischer for for shining a light on DC Water rates that threaten to drive residents off of their property.

At the heart of the problem is D.C. Water’s $ 2.6 billion system to stop the Combined Sewer System’s overflows from contaminating the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers and Rock Creek, by containing the effluent in a mammoth two-tunnel system and sending it to DC Water’s 153-acre Blue Plains wastewater treatment facility.

The system is funded by the Impervious Areas Charge (IAC) under a Clean Rivers Project created by a 2005 Consent Decree.

But why does St. Paul’s Rock Creek Parish Church cemetery — thick with trees and graves and few impervious roads — pay a $200,000 impervious Area Charge annually, comparable to the $209,000 paid by the Washington, DC Nationals Stadium?

It’s not like the cemetery’s dead are producing stormwater runoff, drinking water, showering, flushing toilets and doing laundry at the rate of a 44,000-seat stadium that operates 19 parking lots. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth September 29, 2017 at 12:45 pm 0

57 N Street, NW

“I am Bradley A. Thomas, Chair of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 5E and the Commissioner who represents Single Member District 5E, the SMD which includes the unit block of N Street, NW, where the proposed new restaurant, Republic Cantina, seeks to open. For the past four days, I have been reading e-mail messages and comments on the Prince of Petworth blog [Ed. Note: To clear up any misunderstandings, since 2013 this website has been called PoPville as illustrated in the logo and URL.] regarding ANC5E’s protest of the application for a Class C liquor license recently filed by the proprietor of the prospective new restaurant. The comments I have read, in general, reflect a misunderstanding of both the process of an Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA) protest and the factual background pertinent to this particular application. In the course of my responsibilities as an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner, I don’t usually respond to blogs but in this case, since many of the comments have cast my colleagues on the Commission in what I believe is an unfairly harsh and demeaning light, I felt compelled to do so at this time. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth April 25, 2017 at 11:30 am 178 Comments

Photo by PoPville flickr user Miki J.

Marc lives in NoMa. PoP-Ed. posts may be written about anything related to the District and submitted via email to princeofpetworth(at)gmail please include PoP-Ed. in the subject line and the neighborhood in which you reside.

The following is written testimony that has also been submitted to the Council of DC.

“Testimony Opposing the Anti-Airbnb Bill, 22-92. by Marc Gersen

I live and vote in Ward 6 and I host on Airbnb. I urge you to vote “no” on this bill. First, I will explain how the 15-day limit harms ordinary D.C. residents like me. Second, I suggest a more targeted approach to regulating short-term rentals. Don’t regulate natural persons sharing their own home. Instead, focus on large apartment rental buildings, which advertise entire units online. These are the real de facto hotels. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth February 16, 2017 at 12:30 pm 21 Comments

ward5 shelter rendering
Rendering of 1700 Rhode Island Ave, NE via DC Department of General Services

Henri Makembe is a ANC commissioner of SMD 5B03 and resides with his family in Brookland. When not conducting ANC business, he enjoys playing pick-up soccer and watching the English Premier League.

PoP-Ed. posts may be written about anything related to the District and submitted via email to princeofpetworth(at)gmail please include PoP-Ed. in the subject line.

My family and I are lucky enough to live in Brookland, but I know that this is not an opportunity available to everyone in our city. There is not enough affordable housing in the District. Family homelessness in DC is an acknowledged problem. And DC General is not an appropriate solution for families experiencing homelessness. Mayor Bowser is attempting to fix this problem by opening smaller housing facilities across the city. As many of you know, one of these facilities is slated to open in ANC 5B at 1700 Rhode Island Ave, NE.

Since the announcement of this plan, there has been a great deal of support for these smaller facilities as a way of combatting family homelessness.  Given the numerous reports of abuse at DC General and the tragic disappearance of Relisha Rudd, there is no doubt that the new facility will be a marked improvement for families currently residing at DC General. Advocates for people experiencing homelessness also agree that this proposed approach of smaller facilities, rather than one large shelter, will better support families.  As Councilmember Cheh shared in a letter to her constituents, “studies show that smaller shelters that allow for greater interaction between residents and staff make these traumatized individuals feel safer and more comfortable. And, as is true with healthcare and schools, the smaller the ratio between individuals and service-providers, the better people fare. And, finally, smaller sites mean greater potential for more community partners and non-profit relationships…Smaller shelters will allow us to diversify and take advantage of new and dynamic methods of providing human services..”

While canvassing our neighborhood to increase awareness about the proposed site, I have heard from many of our neighbors who are ready to welcome our new families with open arms. In fact, a couple of them shared their story of experiencing homelessness at some point of during their life. Others shared their experience hosting a relative going through a rough time with no roof over their head.  Many more shared their concerns about living paycheck to paycheck and reflected on the benefit of having such facilities for those who experience an emergency before that next payday. These stories made me proud to be a Brookland resident. As I said during  my campaign, Brookland has a history of community members coming together to support each other through good times and bad. After all, one of the reasons that we all chose Brookland as our home was due to the diverse, open community that we have worked to build.

However, since the location of the facility was announced, there also has been much discussion and criticism. Some of this criticism encompasses valid concerns about the height of the proposed facility, design aesthetics, parking, and a general lack community involvement in picking the site.

A more concerning undercurrent, however, are comments that reinforce the worst stereotypes about families experiencing homelessness. Some neighbors assert that a temporary housing facility for families will somehow lead to increased crime or plummeting property values. Others indicate the proposed location, near bus routes, grocery stores, a library, and park, is somehow unsuited for homeless families. Then there’s the false outrage about nearby liquor stores and a suggestion that families should use the alley to enter and exit the facility, so as to not increase neighborhood foot traffic.These types of comments do not represent Brookland. They do not represent the neighborhood we’ve built.

Let me be clear: DC’s rollout plan for the facility in our ward was not particularly well-executed. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 17, 2016 at 12:40 pm 114 Comments

Photo by PoPville flickr user Hugh Clarke

I’ve gotten a few emails lately asking me, nicely, to stop posting so many political posts. All I can say is that, no, I will not stop. I’ve been chronicling the happenings in the District for ten years now and elections have always been a big deal. For the most part I simply post what readers send me without personal commentary. And while I do try to be relatively impartial – this is not the Washington Post – it’s a neighborhood blog run by one guy who does have opinions.

Now, I’m not saying we’re facing 1933 all over again but I have seen that movie. I remember very well what happens even if this is a different version. So I will break impartiality for this and say publicly that I am an ally to those in DC who need an ally. Whether it is someone who faces intimidation, fear, harassment, whatever in the current climate – I am here for you. I will be your ally and I will amplify your story. Whoever you are. A woman, an immigrant, LGBTQ, Muslim – I will stand with you. That is my pledge. Believe me, I hope I don’t hear from you. I hope the fears and concerns of many do not continue to pan out. But if they do, and you live in the District of Columbia or the greater area – I am here and I have faith the greater PoPville community will support you. I can always be reached at [email protected] should you need to contact me.

from the Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II

If I lose readership over this – so be it. I prefer to sleep well at night. Having said all that, I don’t plan on being a partisan hack either. I am not a politician and I don’t intend to become one. I’m just saying I’m not a robot either. It’s funny, honest to God, I’m consistently attacked by some far right nuts who accuse me of being a pinko commie and at the same time I’m consistently attacked by left wing wackos who accuse me of being a mini Trump. It never ceases to amaze me and make me laugh. Truth be told, which is obvious to many long time readers, for the most part I tend to associate with the words sang by the great Patterson Hood: “And all them politicians, they all lyin’ sacks of…”

And for those who do stay with me – fear not – coverage of restaurants, bars, real estate, pets, trees, transoms and all the other regular neighborhood news will continue with full force!

-Dan Silverman: Citizen of the District of Columbia

by Prince Of Petworth May 20, 2016 at 10:05 am 43 Comments


Word of Domku closing has loosened a few memories for me. I’m gonna have to put on my old man hat and remind some folks what Petworth was like it 2005 when they first opened. Petworth was spectacular in 2005, thank you very much. It was spectacular because it was “real” and the people were the best. No nonsense, no bullshit, no pretension. Now despite the fact that Petworth was the most underrated neighborhood in the District, it was far from perfect. There were not many sit down restaurants on Upshur Street (RIP old school Hitching Post) and there certainly weren’t any that served borscht. In came Kera Carpenter with W. Domku. Domku was a game changer. It was cool as shit and despite it’s originality it was most definitely not pretentious. It was what so many of us had been pining for – simply a cool spot to eat, drink and meet folks from the neighborhood (and beyond.)

Now having said that Domku was far from perfect. I actually always enjoyed the food but as others have noted the service was, at times, uh, inconsistent. And the owner was at times, uh, no nonsense. But let’s again go back to 2005 for a minute. Opening a new restaurant on Upshur street was not roses, rainbows and celebrations like it is today. You had to be tough as nails. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth May 16, 2016 at 12:55 pm 36 Comments

Photo by PoPville flickr user Ian Livingston

In Response to “Harassment Outside Union Station”

By Korrin L. Bishop, Communications Fellow on behalf of Capitol Hill Group Ministry

No. We’re not all social workers. We’re not all extroverts, we don’t always feel safe, and we don’t always know what to do. However, when most of us see someone in need, we want to help.

So, rightly, a PoPville reader recently posed the question, “What can be done?” What can we do to help the men and women experiencing homelessness at and around Union Station?

There are many changes happening in D.C. lately that unfortunately leave too many of our vulnerable neighbors living on the streets with nowhere to go. When this happens, we see that suffering on our daily commutes. And, we may not all be social workers, but there is always something we can do to help.

Depending on how you want to make an impact, some ways to be involved include: (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth May 9, 2016 at 2:15 pm 102 Comments

Photo by PoPville flickr user DoctorJ.Bass

Elizabeth Nicoletti is a 12th and V Street homeowner and Garrison parent.

Why is it so hard to commit to DC schools?

The green text bubble lit up on my iPhone, and I could see the words from across my kitchen counter, “Exciting news! We bought a new house!” The text came from close friends who live on our block. Our kids are similar ages, we all go to the local park regularly, and twice a year we co-organize neighborhood events. However, their oldest is entering Pre-K, and they cannot commit to the local school.

The local school is Garrison Elementary School. I decided to send my son to Garrison for numerous reasons – its high-quality teachers, vicinity, curriculum and diversity. Watching my son thrive in Garrison’s rich cultural bastion confirms our decision. At three years old, he is writing, reading and dancing ballet and hip-hop alongside his bright and eager classmates. However I am constantly confronting shortcomings with the school’s structure. A reoccurring mouse infestation, a faulty heating and cooling system and acres of unusable athletic fields are distracting students and teachers from reaching their full potential. And they continue to weigh on parents’ conscience about whether or not this is the best setting for long-term success. (more…)


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