IMG_7371
601 Massachusetts Ave, NW

We first reported the scuttlebutt back in April 2014. It’s official. The liquor license placard for RPM Italian/Café 110 says:

“Restaurant serving modern and classic cuisine with 300 seats and a Total Occupancy Load of 350. Requesting a Sidewalk Cafe with 90 seats and a Summer Garden with 60 seats.”

Also of note – they’ll likely serve breakfast and lunch too as they’ve applied for the following hours: Sunday through Thursday 7am-2am, Friday and Saturday 7am-3am.

You can see RPM Italian’s Chicago menus here.

IMG_7373

IMG_7372

IMG_7272
I-395 at 3rd and Massachusetts Ave, NW

From a press release:

“Today, Mayor Muriel Bowser joined Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton and Property Group Partners to break ground on Capitol Crossing, a $1.3 billion project in Ward 6 that will transform a seven-acre site surrounding the I-395 Center Leg Freeway into a cityscape that will span three blocks and reunite the East End and Capitol Hill communities in the District of Columbia.

“Capitol Crossing represents a major milestone for economic and neighborhood growth in the District of Columbia,” said Mayor Bowser. “I am excited to break ground on a project that will have a positive and lasting impact on our residents, bringing good paying jobs to the District, and helping to create more pathways to the middle class.”

capital_crossing

The development of Capitol Crossing is expected to create 4,000 construction jobs and 8,000 permanent jobs, all while dramatically improving the utility infrastructure supporting local neighborhoods. Once completed, annual new property tax revenue of $40 million is expected. Capitol Crossing will deliver almost 70,000 square feet of retail space, over 1,100 parking spaces, and 440 bicycle parking spaces. New I-395 entrance and exit ramps will improve traffic flows and make travel along Massachusetts Avenue safer for pedestrians and cyclists. Infrastructure will be upgraded for the surrounding neighborhoods. (more…)

unnamed

Farewell formstone…

A reader reports:

“Saw this on Friday. They are chipping the formstone off the old Fringe building on New York Ave. NW with a hammer and chisel.”

Ed. Note: Capital Fringe is now located at 1358-1360 Florida Ave, NE.

And thanks to a twitter reader for reminding me that this was also A.V. Ristorante Italiano’s space that closed in 2007. Here’s a couple shots from flickr:

44179323_2c8fcd0df6_z
Photo by Kate Mereand-Sinha

186850418_ed973892b7_z
Photo by Shawn Honnick

IMG_7271
457 Massachusetts Ave, NW

This is the former Buddha Bar space on Mass Ave.  I’d about given up hope on the Texas de Brazil steakhouse. Alas they’ve applied for a liquor license:

“New restaurant with the style of service similar to a Brazilian Steak House. Total occupancy load is 360. Sidewalk Café with seating for 82.”

IMG_7270

You can see their menus here.

Ed. Note: In other steakhouse news the Mastro’s is now open at 13th and F St, NW.

IMG_6526

IMG_6535

I used to get asked about this airshaft like clockwork every six months. From Legacy.com:

“On Friday, April 24, 2015, exhibits designer and painter, Val E. Lewton died of cancer. Born in Santa Monica, California, son of movie producer Val Lewton, and Ruth Knapp, Val had a successful career in the Washington, DC art world. He spent 32 years at the Smithsonian Institution, designing hundreds of exhibits, including the award-winning Louis Comfort Tiffany Exhibition. He retired as Chief of Design at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Val continued to design exhibits as a consultant, working with a variety of museums, most notably The Phillips Collection. An artist since childhood, for over 50 years Val was known for painting urban landscapes of DC. He exhibited in galleries and has work represented in museum collections. Val’s extensive photographs reflect historical changes in the neighborhoods around Gallery Place and his public art projects include the “trompe l’oeil” airshaft mural at 3rd St. and Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC. Val was very active in supporting local arts including being president and founding member of The Studio Gallery. He penned illustrations for Smithsonian Magazine and published art critiques. He is well known for The Washington Review article, “Where Has All the Color Gone?” A dedicated runner, Val was president of the Beltway Striders. He ran over 20 marathons, including 8 Boston marathons. In his running career, Val’s best marathon time was 2 hours 43 minutes. A sailor since childhood, Val actively raced sail boats until the fall of 2014. Val is survived by his wife, Claudia Minicozzi, sons Christopher and Victor Lewton and their wives, stepchildren Bill, Alex and Regis Minicozzi and their spouses, and nine grandchildren. His marriage to Jean Kling ended in divorce. A memorial service will be held on Friday, May 8 at 3 p.m. at The Washington Ethical Society.”

3rd_and_mass

From DDOT:

“The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) and Property Group Partners (PGP) announced that a new phase of utility relocation work along Massachusetts Avenue and H Street NW, between 2nd Street and 4th Street in Ward 6, is scheduled to begin on Saturday, April 11, 2015, from 8 am to 6 pm. This will lead to several road closures and temporary lane closures, resulting in moderate-to-heavy traffic delays, in the coming weeks.

Commuters should be advised that during this phase, which is expected to last five months, Massachusetts Avenue will be closed at 2nd Street on Saturday, April 11. Detour signs will point motorists around the work zones to use H, I, K and 5th Streets.

During this phase, H Street westbound will no longer connect directly through Massachusetts Avenue. Instead, H Street will continue straight from 2nd Street toward the intersection of 4th and Massachusetts. Motorists traveling to H Street can turn south (left) onto 4th Street and west (right) back onto H Street.

Additionally, work on 3rd Street between E Street and Massachusetts Avenue will also begin during this phase. Drivers can expect lane closures on 3rd Street. Parking will be restricted on 3rd Street for the duration of this work.

Besides Saturday’s closures, there will be continuous closures on Mondays and Tuesdays, from 7 am to 12 am the next day; Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, from 7 am to 3 pm; and Saturdays and Sundays, only as needed, from 8 am to 6 pm

Motorists are advised to plan for additional travel time, as traffic delays are likely to occur, or use alternative routes to bypass the construction area. Motorists, pedestrians and cyclists are urged to stay alert and to use caution when traveling through the work zone.”