09/18/14 11:15am

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“Dear Popville,

On Tuesday, you published a message from NADZ, a group that opposes an initiative by a group of resident in Lanier Heights to rezone the rowhouses there from an R-5-B designation to an R-4 designation. ANC1C has not yet taken a position on the initiative, and accordingly, we look forward to eventually hearing the views of the affected neighbors, whether for or against. We were disappointed, however, to see NADZ make a number of inaccurate representations concerning our process in the message that you published.

By way of correction, ANC1C did not hold a meeting on Wednesday night. Rather, our Planning, Zoning, and Transportation Committee held a meeting on Wednesday night. The Committee held its meeting on the thirdWednesday of the month at the Kalorama Recreation Center. which is the same night, and the same location, where the Committee has held nearly all of its meetings for many, many years. The location has nothing to do with the Kalorama Citizens Association. All of our Committees hold their meetings at this location because it is one of the few spaces in Adams Morgan that are owned by the District of Columbia government where our Committees can meet without having to pay a fee. And the inclusion of the item the Committee’s agenda was not for the purposes of having the ANC take a position on the matter. Rather, the Committee invited staff from the Office of Planning to explain to the community and to the Commission how a re-zoning proposal would be handled by the District government bodies that have responsibility for such matters, and what ANC1C’s role in such a process would be.

We hope that all Adams Morgan residents who are interested in the Lanier rezoning issue will participate fully in the process as it unfolds. We also hope that all parties will refrain from mis-characterizing ANC1C’s actions.

Sincerely,
Billy Simpson
Chair, ANC1C”

09/18/14 10:45am

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photos courtesy Golden Triangle BID

From a press release:

“Akridge and Mitsui Fudosan America announced today the grand opening of 1200 Seventeenth Street NW, a 170,000 square foot, commercial office building, two blocks from the Farragut North Red Line Metro station in the Golden Triangle Business Improvement District. The trophy class building is designed to achieve the highest level of environmental sustainability, LEED Platinum.

Ideally located near three Metro lines, the building offers glass on all four sides, expansive ceiling heights, efficient floor plates, a full service 2,500 square foot fitness center, and a best-in-class Client-only rooftop event space framed by a landscaped green roof. 1200 Seventeenth has immediate access to myriad retail, dining, and hospitality amenities on Connecticut Avenue, just steps away. 1200 Seventeenth Street NW features floor-to-ceiling glass and column-free efficient interiors. The building accommodates 9’0” ceiling heights throughout the space and has views of St. Matthews Cathedral to the west, National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception to the east, and the Washington Monument to the south.

Akridge and Mitsui Fudosan America developed 1200 Seventeenth with an ambitious vision to deploy forward-thinking, efficient design and sustainable features. The building design integrates water-saving fixtures that create a 40% reduction in water use, low-emitting materials and ample ventilation to increase air quality, and abundant daylight and views to enhance the quality of life and overall work environment for its occupants. Additionally, the building’s construction used 20% recycled content and recycled over 75% of the construction waste generated, and the building will generate 35% of its power from green power sources. The building features a state-of-the-art, dedicated outside air system (DOAS) with VAV controls, averaging 33% more efficiency than a conventional VAV system.”

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1200 17th St, NW in 2012

09/18/14 9:45am

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Photo by PoPville flickr user Jordan Barab

You can talk about whatever is on your mind – quality of life issues, a beautiful tree you spotted, scuttlebutt, or any random questions/thoughts you may have. But please no personal attacks and no need to correct people’s grammar. This is a place to vent and/or celebrate things about daily life in DC.

09/17/14 10:22pm

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1603 17th Street, NW corner of 17th and Q

While we’re waiting for the Indian Cultural Center to come to U Street, a piece of India has already dropped in Dupont. Thanks to those who sent emails about Pansaari opening on 17th Street.

Their website says:

“We will be an Indian food and spice market, cafe, and cooking school, serving the Dupont area with fresh, authentic Indian ingredients.”

This place is awesome.

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Lots more pictures of the inside after the jump. (more…)

09/17/14 10:05pm

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1029 Vermont Avenue, NW

We judged Stan’s back in 2009. For those not familiar with Stan’s:

““Meet me at Stan’s,” has been the tradition for three generations of devoted customers who gather for happy hour, watching sporting events, celebrating special occasions or just to chill with friends after work.

Washingtonians and visitors alike come to Stan’s year after year hoping to enjoy the legendary cocktails and warm, friendly atmosphere that makes Stan’s a DC favorite. Stan’s originated in upper northwest 38 years ago with the same great food, outstanding service and awesome drinks you find today. Today’s owner, Cathy, has maintained many of the traditions that made Stan’s a DC classic and added a few new touches of her own since she took over 14 years ago.

Stan’s is open for lunch, dinner and late evenings Monday through Friday; evenings on Saturdays and Sundays during football season.”

You can see their menu here.

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From 2009:

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09/17/14 10:02pm

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From 13th and H Street, NE.

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From 5×5:

“U.S.A.I.R.A.N obscures the perceived divide between Iranian and US identities. By reappropriating the exterior of a vacant building in D.C.’s thriving H Street corridor, artist Sanaz Mazinani creates a sculptural symbol for the transference of culture in which one’s personal politics are recontextualized and cross-examined.

The installation brings attention to the void of Washington D.C.’s official Embassy of Iran, which has stood regal yet vacant on Massachusetts Avenue NW since 1980. Mazinani wraps a quintessential mid-century American building — the site of the former Robert L. Christian Community Library — in intricate Islamic patterns. Articulating the nebulous sense of place from the perspective of an emigrant, muraled windows and walls reference the architectural details of the former Embassy. Upon close inspection, one will see that these patterns are comprised of mass media imagery, composed in both parallels and contradictions. U.S.A.I.R.A.N examines absence and placelessness, while at the same time explores the potential for harmony. It is a site from which to build mutual respect and activate cultural exchange.”

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