Your Afternoon Animal Fix

If you have any animal/pet photos you’d like to share please send an email to princeofpetworth(at)gmail(dot)com with ‘Animal Fix’ in the title and say the name of your pet and your neighborhood. Your photos will go into the queue (usually 2 weeks wait) and will be posted in the order I receive them. If you’ve already entered your pet and would like to do so again – that’s no problem – just space the entries out a bit. Please try to send horizontal photos 640×480 (medium size on your iphone) if possible. If you’re not using an iphone any size is fine.

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“Gogo from Hill East”

Harry + opossum

“A black bear in Cleveland Park? No, it’s Harry, opossum-hunting. And the young opossum, who should have been home in bed instead of out and about.”

The opossum.A youngster

14 Comment

  • anonymouse_dianne

    Was GoGo a community cat? Usually they have the left ear tipped like that.

  • I hope the possum was able to ride it out and eventually stroll homeward.

    Harry really does look bear-like there.

    • Harry’s a field spaniel. His ‘hunting’ was all look and no catch – the possum stayed out of reach, went home to bed, and lived to forage another night.

  • What IS Harry, though??
    .
    Gogo is so pretty, but they really did a number on her ear, didn’t they. I understand the value in feral cats; you don’t want to catch the same one over and over. But I see so many cats *with homes* missing pieces of their ear. Why are the rescue groups mutilating adoptable cats? Can anyone justify this?

    • WDC — I think they do the spay/neuter surgery and vaccination first, and test the cats for tameness only afterward.
      .
      My guess is that the tame eartipped cats must’ve been hanging out with — and brought in with — colonies of ferals, rather than brought in individually.
      .
      It does seem like a shame for tame cats to end up being eartipped, though.

    • Mutilating adoptable cats? As a caretaker of ferals, I can assure you this is not what’s happening. We had a very wild feral male cat that I trapped and had fixed. The vet asked if I wanted his ear tipped and I said yes- this is a sign to other feral cat caretakers that the cat has been fixed and there is no need to try to trap it again. Fast forward three years later and this cat thinks he’s a dog and is no longer wild at all. He is the friendliest cat, feral or not feral, I have ever had. His “sister” who was previously trapped, fixed and tipped, is still wild.

      Gogo is awesome by the way. And I think his ear tip is pretty friggin cool.

      • anonymouse_dianne

        Many times with community cats, especially with males, after they have been fixed and no longer hunting for a mate, they will decide it is cool to hang with people where it stays warm. When I volunteered with WARL we had a couple cats that were ear tipped and became friendly. And I think the ear is cool, sort of a Jonny Depp look. When I worked the sp/euter clinic for ferals, we had at last one female came in and was already ear tipped. We kept her with the colony but she didn’t need surgery.

    • I just adopted a cat with a tipped ear. He was caught and neutered as a feral kitten but became tame after falling under the spell of the neighborhood cat lady, and then he made his way to me. He’s shy but sweet as can be. I think his tipped ear gives him a rakish look–I don’t think he minds as like most cats he refuses to look in a mirror.

    • Yes, anybody actually involved with animal rescue groups can “justify” this. There are hundreds of stray cats roaming the city, and thousands more owned by irresponsible people who don’t get them spayed or neutered, then dump the litters at the shelters (or in the alley). So the shelters have the heartbreaking job of killing many thousands of animals every year.

      Happily, some community cats, who have been trapped, vaccinated, neutered and ear tipped, do sometimes form bonds with people in their neighborhood, and charm their way into a permanent indoor home (or indoor/out, as may be the case.)

      If “mutilation” bothers you, please donate money to an animal rescue group so they can continue paying for spay/neuter and vet care for the hundreds of animals they are always trying to place in homes.

      • HaileUnlikely

        Agreed. And FWIW I had no idea how expensive that all was until my wife and I adopted a <2 week old kitten off the street and thus were responsible for 100% of its vet care from the beginning.

    • @wdc, Harry is actually the same Field Spaniel seen serving as a support for Maddy Beagle way back in this memorable Animal Fix: http://www.princeofpetworth.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Maddy-span-e1334676604699.jpg He’s completely chill unless there’s prey in play.

  • Emmaleigh504

    Love Gogo’s little orange nose!
    Go get ’em Harry!

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