Washington, DC


Photo by PoPville flickr user Bekah Richards

“Dear PoPville,

Tuesday evening (3/27) around 8:30pm, I was walking NW on Adams Mill Road toward the zoo, on the west side of the street. I noticed four young men come out of Walter Pierce Park behind me and follow me. Since it was not particularly late, I wasn’t concerned at first, but looking back, I noticed that they all wore parka hoodies and had the hoods pulled up over their heads, and they weren’t speaking. The street was getting darker as I walked down the hill past Ontario Road, and I decided against putting my earbuds in so I could focus on what was happening behind me, as it appeared they were walking quickly, catching up to me. Read More

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Fabiana sent the photo above and asked: “This is 14 St NW between Randolph and Shepherd. What happened?”

Amber replied: “Spoke to officer and they are executing a search warrant.”


3925 14th Street, NW

Steve reported around 10pm:

Astrid pool hall was just raided. The FBI swat team ran through and there are about 10 old guys handcuffed out front. It looked like only one or two were arrested.”


via google maps

Harry reported shots fired in Truxton Circle around 11pm:

“Not seeing this yet on the MPD twitter, but last night around 11pm I heard about 7-10 gunshots in the 200 block of Q Street, NW. MPD arrived promptly, swept the area, found casings through the street.

And Benjamin passes on from Adams Morgan around 10pm:

MPD reported:

“Alert: Robbery (Gun) at 2213 hrs in the 1800 block of Ontario Pl NW. Lookout for a B/M, 6’4″ with facial hair, black clothing, black bandanna, armed with a handgun.”

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The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.


via Office of Zoning files

Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 1C/Adams Morgan, at its regularly-scheduled meeting on May 2, voted unanimously to oppose an attempt to increase the height of a residential building at 1766 Lanier Place NW. The proposed expansion requires the developers to get zoning relief, which is what brought the matter before the ANC.

The property is in an area which was “downzoned” in 2016, after residents successfully persuaded the DC Zoning Commission to change the area’s zoning designation (today called “RF-1”) so that buildings were limited to three stories of no more than 35 feet total. Read More

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Photo by PoPville flickr user nevermindtheend

“Dear PoPville,

I’m wondering if you might be able to help me right a wrong in my neighborhood that has proven difficult to address. We park on the street in Lanier heights, which is nestled between Adams Morgan, Columbia Heights and mount Pleasant. It can be a pain depending on when you are looking for a spot. (As an illustration: a couple weeks ago my wife had a spot stolen from her by some guy who then verbally berated her for being angry that he had stolen the spot she waited 10 minutes for. It took her 20 mins to find another spot)

There is a large parking spot outside of an apartment building called the Chalfonte. The spot in question is on the south side of Harvard where it intersects with Argonne Place, and is big enough to fit a small car and a smart car, a REALLY big car, or a big-ish car like a Jeep SUV and a motorcycle.

The issue is that I’ve noticed over the last few weeks that it is ALWAYS the same black jeep and the same motorcycle parked there. Read More

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“Is this legit?”

legit

“Dear PoPville,

Random construction workers using construction equipment to tow cars seems odd to me. Hope it hasn’t damaged the cars! To be clear, they only moved the cars a bit in each direction so maybe they were trying to be nice and to not get people ticketed for parking in the area they needed to do work? It just seemed weird to me.”

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lanier heights

The infamous battle concludes…?

“Dear PoPville,

Last night the DC Zoning Commission handed neighbors a rare victory against untrammeled development when it voted 5-0 to grant a petition, presented jointly by Lanier Heights neighbors and ANC 1C, to downzone the bulk of Lanier Heights from R5B (which allows multi-unit apartment buildings) to R4 (which allows only row houses with a maximum of 2 units absent an unusually large lot size; normally, this means a home of several bedrooms along with an English basement).

The residents of Lanier Heights had overwhelmingly supported the proposal both out of revulsion at a series of ugly popups, which had overshadowed their row houses and deprived their gardens of light and air, and concern that breaking row houses up into apartment buildings of four or even more units meant that fewer families with children would be able to live in close-in neighborhoods. The neighbors testifying at the hearing elegized the mixed character of Lanier Heights, which has both apartment buildings and family-supporting row houses, while decrying the impact that popups, popbacks and cut-ups posed to the area’s diversity. Read More

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l pop

“Dear PoPville,

What’s the Matter with Pop-ups?

Some people hate them.
Some people like them.
Most people are “meh”.

On Monday evening, some of the haters and some of the likers will be nervously shuffling around in the crowded Jerrily R. Kress Memorial Hearing Room at 441 4th Street NW, Suite 220-S (Judiciary Square) waiting their turn to speak (for up to three minutes) before the five members of the Zoning Commission, who will listen, and eventually vote on, an application by residents of Lanier Heights and ANC1C to “rezone” the row house sections of that mostly-apartment-house neighborhood in order to (you guessed it): “Stop Pop-ups”.

If the commissioners decide to grant the rezoning application, owners of residential row houses in Lanier Heights will lose some of their existing property rights. Building height will be capped at 35 feet (rather than the current “matter-of-right” 50 foot limit) and the maximum number of apartments or condos that can be carved out of a single row house will be two. (There is no numerical cap under current zoning, although four units are typical for houses on small to medium size lots).

If this all sounds eerily familiar to you, its probably because you remember that the Zoning Commission recently took the initiative to redefine the rules citywide for the District’s 35,000 row houses located in R4 zones. They requested a study from the Office of Planning in 2014, who came back with suggestions to reduce matter-of-right development in R4 zones. New rules were approved summer 2015, reducing the “M-o-R” for height by five feet, from 40 to 35, and limiting the maximum number of residences per building at two.

What you probably didn’t know (unless you are a devoted reader of this blog) is that the battle over pop-ups in Lanier Heights was well underway at least a year before the zoning commissioners decided to take a look at the city’s R4 zones. Read More

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