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  • Josh

    Heads will explode…

  • jdre

    So a slightly less palatable corporate chain from Texas is moving in instead of a more-popular-at-the-moment corporate chain from South Africa. Despair.

    • Anonymouse

      It’s apples and oranges. A convenience store vs. a chicken restaurant. There are already two convenience stores on the same block, do we really need a third?

      • jdre

        A) I understand that, but thanks for assuming I’m a moron. My point is I’d be more sad if 7-11 was the decision in place of something that isn’t also already littering every block in DC. There’s a Nando’s 2.2 miles away as well, and one in every neighborhood, more or less. How much inexplicably trendy chicken-on-plate does DC need? Again, my point: more “crappy v. crappier” than “apples v. oranges.” “Oh no, we are getting an eyesore instead of a different kind of eyesore.”
        B) I wouldn’t think so, but I guess market research says yes. #helpmefreemarket

        • Anon

          OMG DUDE CHILLAX!!!

          • jdre

            Oh, okay.

        • Anonymouse

          You’re welcome!

  • sproc

    Despite all the 7-Eleven hate of late, I’d guess this is a good spot due to the hotels and potential for decent round the clock business.

    • plotkin

      but there’s one less than a half mile up the road, across from the zoo

      • Anon

        Nobody staying at those hotels is going to hike up to the 7-Eleven by the zoo unless they’re going to the zoo.

      • sproc

        For people not used to walking beyond the end of their driveways, that might as well be Chevy Chase. Line of sight makes a huge difference.

        • Anonymous

          Haha, true

  • Anon

    I can’t say a 7-Eleven won’t be nice to have in the neighborhood, but it’s probably going to hurt the little independently-owned Manhattan Market just up the block. And I’m perplexed as to how this moronic zoning board has a problem with Nando’s opening here, but 7-Eleven is just fine.

    • anon

      Without checking the zoning of this particular building or the waiver Nando’s was seeking, my guess is someone can open a convenience store with packaged goods as a matter of right. Nando’s was seeking some kind of special exemption (presumably the zoning doesn’t allow sit-down restaurants as a matter of right), and the commission was only willing to grant that exemption for an initial 5 years, which was too much risk for Nando’s.
      .
      So, you’re taking a lot of little (mostly dumb, in my opinion) bureaucratic machinations and anthropomorphizing it into the board saying “yes we like 7-11 and we don’t like Nando’s”, which just isn’t the case.

      • Anonymouse

        Actually, sit-down restaurants ARE allowed by matter of right. Fast food establishments (which Nando’s is classified under DC regulations) are not, so that’s what Nando’s was seeking an exemption for.
        .
        According to the BZA decision, three viable tenants emerged when the building’s owner was seeking proposals — a mattress store, a convenience store and Nando’s. My guess is that the convenience store was 7-11, and since the Nando’s failed, the building owner’s broker contacted 7-11 and basically said the site is yours if you want it.

        • textdoc

          Interesting about Nando’s being classified as fast food rather than as a sit-down restaurant.
          .
          Does this mean that all “fast casual” places (Cosi, Panera, Chipotle, Chop’t, etc.) are classified as fast food?

          • jdre

            I’d be surprised if they aren’t. They are in my book (FWIW).

            You can sit down at McDonald’s, too.

          • Anon

            You can also take out from Maketto, to name one of many examples. Nando’s is clearly a much more popular sit down option than McDonald’s, so your point makes no sense.

          • Anonymouse

            If you pay before you are served then yes.

          • brookland_rez

            My understanding is BZA classifies a restaurant as fast food if you pay for your food prior to eating.

      • Anon

        If they’re unwilling to make an exception for Nando’s, then yes, fundamentally that is what they are saying.

        • jdre

          I’m not seeing how allowing a business that (presumably) doesn’t require an exception to move in over one that does (presumably) need the exception is at all the same as saying “we like 7-11 and we don’t like Nando’s.”
          If anything, making any type of exception would be saying, to 7-11, and all businesses ever denied such an exception, “get stuffed.”

        • Anonymouse

          No. That’s not what happened. They DID make an exception for Nando’s, on the condition that Nando’s reapply for another exemption 4 (or was it 5?) years later. Nando’s just decided it wasn’t worth the financial risk to open and then potentially (though not definitely or even likely IMO) have to close later.

  • Anon

    Given the number of chicken wings left behind, 7-11’s should probably have an onsite vet.

  • Anon

    There’s a 7-11 just a few blocks North and an animal hospital going into the Sam’s Park and Shop. Seems a bit redundant. Better options for that block — a decent restaurant, a decent gym, a decent coffee shop…

    • jdre

      ^Exactly.

      • jdre

        And to clarify, I don’t define Nando’s as “a decent restaurant.” I’d define something unique (in ownership if not menu) as “a decent restaurant.”

        • Anonymouse

          So, Pasta Italiano?

  • brookland_rez

    That’s what the NIMBY’s up there get for opposing Nando’s. Don’t like Nando’s? Fine. You get a 7-11.

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