32 Comment

  • Ally

    Very Nation of Ulysses.

  • It’s a DIY music venue house place

  • I shed a tear when I walked by their last blowout on Sunday, but it was not out of sadness.

    • Enjoy your new fellow white and white collar neighbors! Maybe ya’ll can start a book club or a neighborhood watch?

      • Great point, Susan. I’m really going to miss the diversity the band brought to the neighborhood over the last couple of years. No question they were all that was standing in the way of the gentrification of CH.

  • We have a band next door that plays all the time….ba-bye! Hope your new Brookland neighbors enjoy you

  • Apparently, upon hearing they were being gentrified out of the neighborhood, the Bathtub Republic attempted to secede and become an actual republic. They barricaded themselves in behind a wall of amplifiers, show posters, xmas lights, and the love of hundreds of their friends, but ultimately their drum, synth, and multi-guitar defense was insufficient when faced with conventional weaponry (i.e., mortgage lenders offering low, fixed 30-year interest rates with only 5% down!).

    Rumor has it the rowhouse will be converted into six stories of ultra-luxury cat condos, starting from the mid-$300s.

    The Bathtub Republic is dead. Long live the Bathtub Republic!

  • The assumptions that everyone seems to be making about the new owners of this house, without any knowledge about who they are, reveal a lot about the popville readers’ personal prejudices.

  • Hey, if they can’t afford to pony up $650,000 to stay there, that’s THEIR problem. Get a fourth job, already, and quit complaining! #trumptowersCoHi

  • kstove

    As much as I enjoyed being able to attend a live concert while laying in bed (I was a basement-dwelling neighbor of the Bathtub whose bedroom wall was the back of their stage), I cannot say I will totally miss it. I love music and appreciate what they’re trying to do, I just hope that their new home is detached.

  • Looks like they stole the bathtub based on their FB page.

    Yes, in this country, people go to work and then SOMETIMES they go home to a house they bought (not rented and trashed). Weird. I am guessing no one here knows anything about the new owners, their intentions, their social causes, etc.

  • I’ve always wondered how places like this keep their neighbors from burning the place down in the middle of the night. Especially somewhere like 11th Street, which is well past gentrified.

  • This thread is the perfect example of how people so wrapped up in their own daily lives miss how art can enrich a community. If any of you residents ever took the time to go into the Bathtub, a warm and welcoming environment that encouraged anyone to attend shows, you would have seen people of all races, ages, and economic backgrounds bonding over music and community. Many other neighbors did attend shows, and kept coming back. But, at least the folks on this thread will get their beauty sleep now, that way they’ll be up in time for brunch.

    • That’s all well and good – it’s completely reasonable to be sad about the loss of unique and interesting venue with a positive environment. It does diminish your point, I’d say, if you fail to extend that warm and welcoming feeling to the new owners. It’s not as if they chose to kick anyone out – they just bought a house that was on the market and therefore apparently deserve sassy remarks from internet commenters.

      • That’s your job now, I can’t afford to stay in the neighborhood.

        • If all the new people in this neighborhood can be reduced to a white, book clubbing, neighborhood watching, brunch eating stereotype, then allow me to wish you the best in whatever lazy, potsmoking, eternally complaining group home full of smelly hippies that you’ll be moving to.

        • Then I’m sure you’ll set up an interesting venue in the basement of your rowhouse somewhere else. And all your brunch eating former neighbors will miss you dearly. And that new neighborhood can be real and ungentrified, just the way you like it.

    • Okay, Susan, you were a groupie who liked the band. I’m sorry for your sake that they’re moving to a new location, I really am. However, this is in no way the sob story you are trying to make it out to be. The band was not exactly a neighborhood institution (dare I say some might consider them your hated gentrifiers themselves!) and I never walked by a performance where I saw an overly diverse crowd. That’s still okay, they didn’t have to be long-term residents or appeal to anyone but hipsters. They were doing what they loved and thought it mattered. Good for them.

      On the other hand, it makes perfect sense why most people in the neighborhood would prefer not to hear their nightly practice sessions in addition to putting up with their regular concerts. Maybe it’s hard to imagine as a groupie, but I have a hunch some people just didn’t like their music and would prefer having a neighbor who didn’t force it upon them. That really is not the unreasonable position no matter how you try to twist it.

      In any case, welcome to the new owners and good luck to Bathtub Republic, wherever you may go next!

  • Thanks for all the interest in our spot! All are welcome at our new spot, over in Brookland, at 10th and Douglas NE.

    To our former wall-sharing neighbors like @kstove: we totally get it. and trust us, not a day went by that we didn’t praise the stars for having such cool neighbors like @kstove who tolerated our shows and were willing to work with us, rather than against us. the spirit of the bathtub republic is community-based, and that includes our neighbors. we’re forever grateful for the flexibility and consideration of our next-door neighbors, without which we would never have been able to build the bathtub republic to what it is today. and, we couldn’t be more thrilled that our new spot IS detached. hooray!!!!

    To commenters like @Wowza: listen, we never stole the bathtub. we’re not thieves. and, we treated that house with as much respect as our landlords gave to us in return. trust us, we save as much money as we can. we’re sorry we’re poor. we just are. we’re artists, and can’t help being artists, and we can’t help that we live in a society that doesn’t value art monetarily. that doesn’t mean we don’t work as hard as a young professional might. we work just as many hours, if not more.

    this city is hungry for spots like the bathtub republic. I wish Dan at Popville would pay more attention to the growing DIT/alternative space movement that has turned spots like the bathtub, paperhaus, babe city, 453 florida, communiverse (RIP), hole in the sky, above the bayou, the dougout, rocketship (RIP), and many others into true institutions. the music scene is overflowing here, and community spaces like ours help catch that overflow. i hope you can come to a show sometime at our new spot. all are welcome. and, if you’re a neighbor of the new bathtub republic, please come talk to us if you’re concerned. I’m sure we can work with you.

    love always,
    residents of the bathtub republic

  • i understand how some people may be excited for an absence of noise but what I think you’re missing out on is something greater than I could explain.

    I played here last summer and it was the greatest thing. 30 people, energetic and excited to be a part of something bigger than themselves, all crammed into the basement to foster a community that gave to the arts.

    Yes it would be more considerate for it to be held in a place that is detached, but let’s give bathtub republic the thanks it deserves for giving artists a place to perform when DC tries so hard to push artists from other states out. It was one of my favorite nights of the whole run, even compared to sold out shows in 1000+ venues.

    Love you guys at Bathtub.

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