17 Comment

  • Uninteresting, but it fits in with the rest of the architecture there and it’s a hell of a lot better than what was there before.

  • Always a huge fan of floor to ceiling windows. The area def needs to fill in more though. Always dead at night there.

  • i actually looked at renting here, but ultimately decided against it because of how desolate the neighborhood still is. hopefully it’ll eventually get there.

    • Me too. I ultimately settled on a rowhouse on Carrollsburg Place SW, which is kinda ghetto but a lot more vibrant. I’ll compromise on safety a little to live in an area that has some character! It was also a lot cheaper and a lot more space than these luxury apartments.

  • McArchitecture. Woohoo

  • The entire neighborhood is an architectural scourge.

  • The glass and steel part is fine, it’s interesting, but the brick parts are just depressing. Just look at those jail-cell windows and utterly 2-dimensional pasting of the brick. There is no cornice to cap the building, nor is there a soaring gesture to let the lines of the building extend skyward – it just sort of…ends. Blah, I say.

  • I think it would really be nice to see an exemption to the height limit in this area. There’s no ‘charm’ to disrupt and maybe we’d see some more interesting architecture.

    • Ballston and Virginia Square in Arlington have much taller buildings but architecturely they are just as bland. I’m not convinced a no strings attached lift of the height limit will improve architecture. Maybe arrange it such that to exceed the height limit you have to provide major community amenities or have innovative architecture (but thats subjective)?

      What I do know is that upzoning the entire neighborhood, as was done in NoMA, Capitol Riverfront and Mount Vernon Triangle, and conceding max height as by-right leaves the developer no incentive to do anything but maximize their profit with a bland box. There has to be successful examples from other cities to emulate…

  • I live in this building. In my estimation, it’s better than the other two JPI buildings on I and Capitol Hill Tower/Courtyard. The best buildings in the area are DOT and the Onyx. As far as changes to the height restriction, I’d support a bump-up in allowable FAR for “U” or “E” shaped buildings, but don’t think taller buildings are necessarily going to lead to more interesting buildings.

    As far as the neighborhood goes, it’s probably boring if you’re single, but if you have kids, the proximity to Garfield and Yards Parks is great. And we, at least, view the SW Safeway as within walking distance.

  • Yawn.

  • It’s an effective, high-density residential building that this city and that neighborhood needs. Don’t like the design, then go to architecture school and let’s see how you effete geniuses do on a project of this scale.

  • I went to architecture school, does that mean I’m allowed to judge? Also, not sure how going to a-school makes you not an effete genius….

    The building is quite bland except for the one penthouse (or maybe common area?) that is probably interesting. Don’t see an obvious roof deck, and no balconies. A pity, I’m sure there are cool views from the top.

    Floor to ceiling windows can be cool, but if this is situated like I’m picturing there are floor-to-ceiling windows with western exposure, which is not so cool. A shame to have to put blackout drapes over such windows to keep from frying.

  • I have floor to ceiling windows with a western exposure. It is wonderful, we have a beautiful view of a sunset every day. When it get bright, we have solar blinds that block the glare but we can still see through them.

  • It’s not too exciting as you can see the exact same building in just about every city in America. Gimme some creativity! I will at least give them a little credit for not doing the whole thing up in bricks. What is it with this area and bricks?!?!

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