Support us!


233 12th Street, SE

“Dear PoPville,

Save Mott’s Market

Neighbors in the Capitol Hill community are banding together to save their corner market, and they need more help.

Since 1916, the corner market at 233 12th St. SE has been a staple in the Capitol Hill community. Known as Mott’s Market, families have come to know this corner market as a pantry, gathering place, and safe haven for the Capitol Hill neighborhood. Mott’s represents a way of life that is disappearing on Capitol Hill. We have lost many similar markets across the city in the past decade and fear we are about to lose another.

The owners of the 233 12th St. property, which includes the corner store, have put it up for sale. A coalition of neighbors are working together to purchase the property with the mission to preserve and revitalize the store. Their aim is to protect this community landmark but recognize that they cannot achieve their goals alone. Read More

0 Comments


233 12th Street, SE

Thanks to Sean for sending the latest on Mott’s Market. The listing for $1,250,000 says:

“Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to purchase beloved Mott’s Market. A wide and large semi-detached rowhome that is prominently on the corner of Gessford Court and overlooking Walter Street – all just steps from Lincoln Park and Eastern Market in the heart of Capitol Hill. Purpose-built in 1916 as a store and second-floor home for Samuel Gotkin, the site appears to have been a corner store for over a century and became Mott’s Market in 1969. It is zoned RF-1 with a commercial use code of 042-Store-Miscallenous and currently has a Retail – Grocery B license from the DC Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration. Read More

0 Comments

“Dear PoPville,

My wife and I went under contract for a condo in early January, and we were told at the time that the seller (a developer that converted an old property into a duplex) needed a few weeks before scheduling closing so that the city could process the paperwork approving/forming the condo association and assigning a tax ID number to the property (required before the developer can sell). That was over two months ago. Read More

0 Comments


photo by angela n.

“Dear PoPville,

My partner and I have started the process of buying our first home. We recently lost a bid, but are preparing to bid on another home tomorrow. I would love to hear perspectives from others on what it takes to win on homes in this market and how they’ve structured bids on homes they won (we of course have our realtor’s perspective already).

I know waiving contingencies is basically required and we have an inspector who will come to the showing with us to give input so we can waive inspection l, but I would love to hear about:

– How much money people are putting down as earnest money (we’ve seen as high as 20% of the purchase price, which surprised me)
– How homes in the $1m-$2m range have appraised when you’ve offered above the list price
– The difference between your offer and the escalation cap (if any). How much should you signal your willingness to bid above your offer?

Thanks for the perspective!”

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list