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Props to the Cops – Arrests in Illegal Dumping

by Prince Of Petworth May 3, 2017 at 10:00 am 16 Comments

no dumping
Photo by PoPville flickr user Beth Shook

From MPD:

“Officers with the Metropolitan Police Department’s Fourth District announced arrests made in reference to several illegal dumping offenses that occurred in the Fourth District.

On April 19, 2017, in the 1600 block of Manchester Street, NW, refuse was illegally deposited. An investigation was conducted and arrested was 36-year-old Michael Harris of Northeast, Washington, DC. He was charged with Illegal Dumping.

On April 20, 2017, in the rear of the 5900 block of Georgia Avenue, NW, refuse was illegally deposited. An investigation was conducted and arrested were 31-year-old Emmanuel Williams of Northwest, Washington, DC, and 41-year-old Sydney Powell of Northeast, Washington, DC. Both defendants were charged with Illegal Dumping.

On May 1, 2017, in the rear of the 3500 block of Georgia Avenue, NW, refuse was illegally deposited. An investigation was conducted and arrested was 41-year-old Jesus Cruz of Northwest, Washington, DC. He was charged with illegal Dumping.”

  • Anonymous

    I get that violent crime (i.e. guns etc) is a problem, but I get upset MPD seems to dismiss the everyday, quality of life issues in DC. I’m glad to see this. Too often they ignore “minor” crimes like public drunkenness, illegal dumping, robberies, street harassment, and prostitution. Th se quality of life issues matter.

    • Daniel in Park View

      +1

    • jonah

      On the daily 4D arrest and crime reports I regularly see both police reports and arrests for most of these things. Today’s shows an arrest for drinking in public, theft second degree, distribution of marijuana, and another illegal dumping.

    • Arouet

      Really? You want more arrests for public drunkenness? Robbery, obviously, but who exactly is public drunkenness harming enough that they deserve a permanent black mark on their record which will forever damage their job prospects?

      Also, the fact that people are being actually arrested for something like illegal dumping rather than cited and released seems like a MASSIVE waste of police resources that prevents them from doing things like even investigating robberies, that actually cause identifiable financial harm, in any meaningful way.

      • Officer Friendly

        “Also, the fact that people are being actually arrested for something like illegal dumping rather than cited and released seems like a MASSIVE waste of police resources that prevents them from doing things like even investigating robberies, that actually cause identifiable financial harm, in any meaningful way.”

        The guys who investigate robberies after the fact aren’t the guys on the street making Possession of an Open Container (POCA) lockups and other quality of life arrests. Detectives get those cases and they by and large are insulated from the day to day street policing.

        As for minor crimes, for some we can do citations (i.e. the 61-D form), but if they’re ignored the Office of the Attorney General rarely signs off on those warrants and the management of MPD usually won’t pay officers to go down to court and try to apply for warrants either off-shift for court pay or even during their shift. If those aren’t enforced, at a certain point police are going to do police things like arrest people if only because there’s actual consequences. If you have quality of life issues you want to enforce and all you do is hand out a citation that’s not likely to be enforced you might as well not even bother; if you lock someone up there’s at least the neighborhood drunk, or guy dumping garbage in Rock Creek is at least inconvenienced and may not do it again

        • Vicar

          Appreciate the details on this, good point.

    • AdMoKalTri

      Street harassment is not actually a crime (most of the time). MPD does huge numbers of prostitution busts, usually in 1D and 5D. (I think they really kicked it up when City Center became a thing and suddenly people were being asked to pay $$$ for condos just a block or two off the main track.)

  • Marty

    years ago, a guy who seemed to lived a few blocks over from me had a trash hauling business – at least there was a little magnetic sign on his truck that said as much. I’d see his truck parked behind a house in the alley nearly every day. At the end of the alley, there was always a rotating pile of household debris….mattresses, TVs, old couches. They’d remain there for a week or so, then DPW trucks would pick them up. I hadn’t put two and two together until one evening when I was out walking the dog, and saw him unloading a bunch of junk from his truck onto that spot on the alley/sidewalk!
    .
    Apparently, it seemed, his business was to charge for pickup, but then to just dump this stuff for DPW to come collect for “free.”

    • Truxton Thomas

      Good work if you can get it!

    • L.

      LOL! Not quite a criminal genius, but at least a scofflaw mastermind.

  • Anon

    You can get, anything you want

    At Alice’s Restaurant.

  • anon

    what does this mean? what’s illegal dumping? are they throwing a bag of trash in a city refuse bin? seems excessive, if so, to arrest/detain these people…

    • jonah

      DPW says illegal dumping is “piles of debris that are not in proper containers (or they are set out in an otherwise unsanitary manner), not at a proper point of collection, or on a vacant lot or public property.” DPW can issue fines for all of this so the scale likely has to be significant or had adverse public health concerns, or be repeated violations to lead to an arrest.

      • John B.

        Or maybe for using other people’s dumpsters? When we had our house renovated several years ago, our general contractor was adamant about not having a dumpster because he said we would end up paying to haul away everybody else’s trash. Looks like he was right because a couple of years later, early one morning, I saw a pickup truck pull up next to the dumpster at the house being renovated a few doors down, and the guys got out and half-filled it with old fencing. I figured it was the people working on the house (it’s a rowhouse so you would have to go around to dump anything from the back) but it turned out to be just some random work crew looking for a convenient and free place to dump their shit.

        • FridayGirl

          +1. My previous landlord sent numerous emails telling us not to keep dumping trash outside of our dumpster and threatened to send us the bill for the fines we’d incur, to which my building’s response was “We aren’t, and the dumpster is always full.” A bunch of random work crews from other places would just throw their crap in our dumpster — I even shooed some away once. The jerks….

    • L.

      I believe the focus is on large or even toxic items that can present a health hazard and/or are a big cost to the city to remove. Sometimes people don’t want to bother with bulky item pickup so they’ll just leave old washing machine, sofa, dresser, refrigerator, mattresses, etc. in an alley or on the side of a freeway. These dumped items can attract wildlife, present danger to kids climbing on it or cars in the area, etc. There are also toxic items/substances that just can’t be thrown away (car batteries, off the top of my head) and again sometimes people will just dump rather than go through proper processes. I would guess for these guys to get arrested they must have done repeatedly and/or dumped some dangerous stuff.

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