Quarter+Glory “a modern take on the classic American watering holes of past generations” opens in the former Jin Space at 14th and U St, NW

IMG_4694
2017 14th Street, NW

From a press release:

“Quarter+Glory, the latest addition to Washington, D.C.’s thriving hospitality scene along the U Street Corridor, today opens its doors at 2017 14th Street NW on the corner of U Street. Patrons will find a modern take on the classic American watering holes of past generations, where all walks of life convened over a shot of whiskey, a cold beer or a simple cocktail and enjoyed good conversation in a convivial atmosphere.

At the core of Quarter+Glory is a menu of 25 cocktails, comprising both “The Survivors” classics and “The Originals” house originals, which will rotate seasonally. Cocktails on tap include the No Sé, a Barrel-Aged Ilegal Mezcal Negroni made with Campari and Cinzano Sweet Vermouth; and Jamie (Here’s How), combining Rittenhouse Rye, Gran Classico and Angostura Bitters with house carbonated Sarsaparilla. Signature originals include: the namesake Quarter+Glory cocktail, a smooth new classic blending Brugal Añejo Rum and Cutty Sark Prohibition Scotch with Punt e Mes Vermouth, Gran Classico Bitters, Pok Pok Tamarind vinegar and salt; Tyrone (Cutty Sark Prohibition Scotch, Pedro Ximenez Sherry, Montenegro Amaro, Giffard Banane Du Brésil, Orange Bitters, Whole Egg, topped off with Founders Porter and nutmeg); and Burn This (Hochstadters Straight Rye, Bonal, Cocchi Vermouth De Torino, Pedro Ximenez Sherry, Benedictine and peated Scotch). With 15 taps, the draught beer selection will be a platform for highlighting local breweries DC Brau, Atlas Brew Works and Right Proper Brewing Company, as well as regional U.S. favorites like Dogfish Head, Ommegang and Lagunitas. A selection of Boilermakers pairing beer or cider with a shot of rye, Bourbon, mezcal or Brennavín Icelandic schnapps is available to tempt the palate. A diverse wine & spirit list covering a range of styles, regions and flavor profiles is also offered, with brown spirits and sipping rums featured prominently.

Quarter+Glory embodies the spirit of creative types of a past era coming together — whether it be journalists, poets, actors, novelists, or just the neighborhood raconteur – to converse about their individual crafts and the unique creative process that connected them. In that vein, Quarter+Glory borrows its name from an alleged secret literary society said to be started by famed playwright Eugene O’Neill. As lore would have it, the members would gather in old waterfront bars and conclude each meet by raising their glasses and pledging, “give me Quarter and Glory!”

Quarter+Glory is managed and operated by Public House Collective, the New York-based hospitality management and consulting company behind NYC nightlife destinations The Rum House and Ward III. The bar is the group’s first venture outside of the New York market and is conceptualized by Ryan P. Burke, President, and Kenneth B. McCoy, Chief Creative Officer. Robert Yealu, who was recently named to D.C.’s first-ever Zagat “30 Under 30” list, has been tapped to serve as General Manager.

“Quarter+Glory is truly an authentic ode to the bars of old New York that my father owned and operated, where folks from a cross section of society gathered to share great drinks and conversation with whomever happened to stride up to the bar,” said McCoy. “We chose D.C. as the place to take our first step outside of New York because the city has such a distinctive energy that feels very much in tune with our own. I think it’s fair to say that Washington, D.C. also captures the essence of Quarter+Glory, ‘Dignified for the Discerning and Bold for the Courageous.’”

Public House Collective partnered with acclaimed design firm Parts and Labor Design to execute their vision for the space, which is inspired by American craftsmanship rooted in tradition. Housed inside a building constructed in 1919, original brick walls set the scene while a 33-feet long oak bar top serves as a frontispiece to the stunning back bar that reaches all the way up to the lofty ceiling. With warm leather banquettes and covered bar stools enhanced by intersections of tweed and other fabrics in various patterns, the 44-seat space evokes a sophisticated handsomeness that is both timeless and effortless. Custom lighting accents add curvature and softness, complementing some of the harder edges noticeable in features like brushed metal and marble utilized in the drink rails located around the room. The original hardwood floors have been refinished and are joined by a new brass entryway detail that will immediately welcome new guests and future regulars to experience the hospitality and community of Quarter+Glory.

Quarter+Glory is located at 2017 14th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 and will be open Sunday – Thursday from 4:30 p.m. – 2:00 a.m., and Friday – Saturday from 4:30 p.m. – 3:00 a.m.”

IMG_4695

31 Comment

  • You know what genuine “American watering holes” and “bars of old New York” DIDN’T have? Six paragraph press releases saying how authentic they are. This is neighborhood corner bar Disneyland.

    • +1,000,000,000,000

    • +1
      its almost like many of the new bars want to be that chill low key neighborhood bar but present themselves otherwise

      best of luck but i have my doubts
      how much of the interior did they change?

    • To be fair I think they’re going for roaring 20s New York, which was just as ostentatious as this place. It also directly preceded the depression. And if a $100 cocktail isn’t a sign that the crash is coming, I don’t know what is.

  • justinbc

    The back-patting in this press release is almost audible.

  • Ah man think they should’ve gone with a solid wood door at the entrance. Nice change from the all black that every new bar/restaurant seem to have been doing lately.

  • Nah, I’m good.

  • Scrillin

    What the hell has happened to this city?

  • No press release should have the word “glory” mentioned so close to “holes.” Captures the ‘Dignified for the Discerning and Bold for the Courageous’ vibe they are going for, right? Thanks for the afternoon laughs, PoP!

  • I think this press release does the bar more harm than good.
    .
    I’ll give it this much — the writing is at least grammatically correct. (I think. I couldn’t make myself read the whole thing.)

  • as long as they gotta $3 cheap beer option im cool with it

  • “where all walks of life convened”
    Except the poors.

    Right in the press release they have a list of who will NOT be able to afford to congregate here:
    “journalists, poets, actors, novelists, or just the neighborhood raconteur”

    • Please, my dad used to come home from a long day on a construction site and kick back with a boilermaker of 90min IPA and Brennavín Icelandic schnapps all the time.

  • My comment was moderated out, but the gist of it was:
    “this looks expensive. Not a place where “all walks of life congregate.” Certainly not the poets, etc in the blurb.

  • I could not bring myself to read any of that press release, but I trust all of your comments that it was painful. However, I stumbled across this place during the snow storm and went for two drinks. I liked it. It’s spacious, has a good ambiance, has attentive staff, and was not too dark or loud like many places these days. Point is: give it a shot.

    • Same. Not gonna read the press release as I’m sure it’s over the top and probably dumb as hell. Just going to pretend that didn’t happen and check it out myself. I like the look and the vibe looks solid, will report back.

  • There is no mention of the mixologist. I’ve been noticing that lately in these types of press releases. Where are they now honing their craft?

  • This is an unfortunate press release. I love drink history & culture, so I understand what they are trying to evoke. However, these are assessments a food critic should be making, not them. Yikes.

  • So…it’s a bar where anyone can walk in and order a drink and talk to other people. How novel.

  • I swear, I was using the random hipster business name generator website (look it up on Google), and this was one of the names it came up with!

Comments are closed.