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“We all need to stay vigilant and do what we can if/when we witness something like this.”

by Prince Of Petworth June 5, 2017 at 12:30 pm 86 Comments


Photo by PoPville flickr user Dean M

“Dear PoPville,

Sunday afternoon, as I was walking through Adams Morgan, I heard yelling. I saw a cab driver, in his cab, and a man and woman standing outside of the taxi. The driver and the man on the sidewalk were yelling at one another. I heard the guy on the sidewalk yell, “Yeah, well you’re the terrorist!” I then said, “Wait, did you just call him a terrorist? You can’t do that. You can’t talk to someone like that!” His companion put her hand over his mouth, and with some effort, shoved him into their building, as he was still trying to yell. The driver then approached me, visibly shaken, and said that he is Ethiopian, and as he was driving this couple, he was listening to an Ethiopian radio station.

The male passenger said, “I don’t want to listen to Al Jazeera.”

The driver explained that it wasn’t. The passenger asked if the driver was Muslim, and when he said that he is, the passenger called him a mother**** terrorist. What I walked into was a continuation of that. The driver was understandably really upset. He didn’t want to report the incident, so there was not much that could be done other than to say how sorry I was that he experienced what he did.

Just a reminder to all of us that we don’t live in a bubble. We all need to stay vigilant and do what we can if/when we witness something like this.

  • This is Awkward

    Thanks for standing up for a stranger, OP! By ignoring bad behavior we implicitly condone it, so it’s great that you felt empowered to stand up for someone. Sounds like the rider’s companion knew his behavior was wrong (or at minimum was embarrassed by it), hopefully he will soon too.

  • jumpingjack

    Thank you for intervening. I so agree, we all need to be willing to step in to protect our fellow residents.
    .
    Bystander intervention trainings give good tools for how to handle these situations. There’s one next week at 6th and I.

  • anonymous

    Sincere question: you can “report” a service employee, who uses hate speech against a customer, but can you actually “report” a customer and to whom? The police? And what would be the charge or the consequences? We still have free speech in this country- even for awful sentiments. That’s how the Westboro folks get to terrorize families. We allow the good with the bad because… free speech.

    • Anonymous

      No, you can’t. Not with no information about who he is.

      • anonymous

        Say you did have information about who he was- i.e., my neighbor called me an Irish bastard and IRA sympathizer. Could I report him to the police given that I know my neighbor’s name and address? (BTW, completely theoretical- no neighbor has called me this!) What would the police do?

        • northeazy

          No–being racist is not a crime. A private citizen can hate and verbalize hatred towards anyone. The issue is if that hate violates one of your rights–such as to be free from harassment, or if the speaker is your teacher or co-worker (in a school or work setting). But someone on the street walking up to you and calling you a racial epithet is protected freedom of speech.

        • textdoc

          If someone did it in a public environment, it _might_ qualify as slander.
          .
          I’m not quite sure what the criteria are as far as distinguishing between a regular ol’ spoken insult and slander. Maybe if your neighbor yells that to you in person, it’s just an insult, but if he says it while the two of you are at an ANC meeting, it might be slander?? Any PoPville lawyers want to clarify?

          • northeazy

            Ironically, if he told other people he was a terrorist, then the cab driver would have a civil claim. But since this man told the cab driver directly, I do not think there is a claim. Nevertheless, it would be civil, not criminal.

            In your hypo, it depends to whom the speech is directed at, and if it is in a crowded room, if the intent of the speaker is defame the person and if the listeners have a reasonable belief the speech is true.

            Now, here comes the bad part. If you call a white person a cracker, that is not slander because truth is an absolute defense to a slander claim.

            However, if you called someone a terrorist, and the speech was directed at the audience (did you know so and so is a terrorist), then you would have a slander claim.

    • Anonymous

      I don’t think it’s “free speech” if you’re directing it at a specific person, especially if it can be taken as a threat. Like if I walk up to you and scream in your face “I’m gonna choke you out, cracker” I don’t think that I can claim it’s just free speech. I don’t know if calling someone a terrorist amounts to a crime but I’d call the cops and let them handle it.

      • northeazy

        threatening to choke someone is an assault and is illegal if you were reasonably in fear for your safety. You can however call someone a cracker or anything else frankly on the street and not be violating any law.

      • lizcolleena

        Threats can be classified as assault so your example doesn’t exactly work. What we commonly know as freedom of speech is freedom from the government censoring our speech. That doesn’t mean anyone can say anything to anyone at any time. Depending on the specifics, it may be harassment. It may qualify as a hate crime. But the original scenario or these examples are all unlikely to be prosecutable so won’t really go anywhere.

        • Anonymous

          All of what you said agrees with what I said. Did you mean to respond to northeazy?

    • textdoc

      You could report it to the SPLC (and maybe also the Office of Human Rights?) as a hate incident. It’s not a hate crime per se, and therefore not prosecutable… but still worth keeping track of.

      • FridayGirl

        Exactly. This is what I was getting at in my comment below. Just because it might not be a crime per say doesn’t mean no one is paying attention, or that no one wants to know.

    • FridayGirl

      I think you could. That’s verbal harassment. Whether the police would do anything is a different question. Why not try to report? This kind of “Oh-nothing-can-be-done” attitude isn’t at all helpful to anyone.

      • northeazy

        Harassment has a legal definition, which varies by jurisdiction. But I can assure walking up to someone on the street and saying “excuse me cracker” is not harassment.

        • FridayGirl

          We don’t know what was said. But if the guy was being threatening in other parts of the exchange, then it very well could be harassment. Why don’t we let the appropriate authorities (police, office of human rights, etc.) decide, yeah?

    • HaileUnlikely

      Not sure what you could report based on facts conveyed in the initial post. However, if he *threatened* the driver, the driver could report that to the police. (I don’t have any idea whether the police would accept a report from a third party about one person verbally threatening another person.)

  • Sue

    Thank you for getting involved. You were brave and good.

  • Moe

    If it was in the 7pm hour, I came across this couple too who had some things to say about my mixed race relationship and children. This time, it was the tall blonde female.

    • NH Ave Hiker

      Yikes.

    • FridayGirl

      Ugh, I hate people.

    • Tom

      I’m sorry that happened to you. Hits close to home because I’m in a mixed-race relationship too, and on Presidents’ Day weekend we were verbally accosted on two separate occasions: One in Columbia Heights, another in Silver Spring. Had I not been with her and wanted to avoid making a scene, I likely would’ve caught an assault charge that day.

      • anon

        How would that possibly worth it in your life? Ignore and go on your way. (If women assaulted everyone who accosted us on the street, a lot of men would be walking around damaged.) Sorry that happened to you, though – it does suck, every single time.

        • Tom

          Oh yeah no doubt it’s 100% not worth it, but I’m a petty, petty man sometimes.

  • Tom

    Good on you, OP. We need more of this. Initially came here to make a Big Lebowski “I’ve had a long day and I hate the F-in’ Eagles!” joke, but it seems kinda trite/tasteless now that I’ve already typed it out.

  • Truxton Thomas

    New administration hires? Thanks for standing up to these pigs.

    • ST21

      Was waiting for a stupid joke like that.

      • FridayGirl

        I don’t know that it was meant as a joke…….

        • ST21

          Either way- stupid comment.

          • Truxton Thomas

            Yeah, definitely don’t associate the current administration with anti-muslim rhetoric. It was probably a longtime D.C. resident.

          • Maymo

            Avoid making assumptions, Truxton. The only verbal anti-Muslim comment I’ve heard on the street came from an African American couple who WERE long-time residents (don’t know them, but recognized as neighbors from a block over).

  • wdc

    But Al Jazeera has some of the best reporting out there!
    Although when I get a cab driver who has the radio cranked up in ANY language, I usually politely ask them to turn it down/ off. If there’s radio/ TV in my environment, I’m going to focus on it, whether or not I want to.

    • lizcolleena

      So I don’t listen to / read Al Jazeera very much, but on the few occasions I have the coverage has seemed fine – objective as any other major outlet and moreso than some (cough, cough Fox cough, cough). However, I read just this morning that being Qatar-based they are quite biased, seemingly intentionally, in favor of the current government there. Just thought that was interesting…

      • ST21

        They got CRUSHED when they published that story last year of their PED “investigation” despite the fact that their “source” admitted that he made everything up. The story had zero credibility and there was almost zero backup documentation. They essentially shut down that division after the story got hammered. Lost all credibility and tried to tarnish names of people who were completely innocent, including one of our own, Ryan Zimmerman.

        • NH Ave Hiker

          bullcrap the story didn’t have any credibility. The source only admitted that he made everything up after the Mannings sent some of their goons and essentially coerced the source into saying so. The Mannings somehow have the best PR, even though they are all a bunch of sleezeballs.

          • ST21

            Actually many of the players mentioned filed lawsuits against AJ who settled out of court… Regardless of what you might think of the Mannings, the “source” still recanted everything yet AJ threw the story out there anyway. They didn’t have much in the form of documentation either- it was pretty careless reporting and they got pummeled for it.

  • KPS

    Weird exchange. When you have an Ethiopian Uber driver you have more than a 50/50 chance he or she is Christian rather than Muslim – not that this matters. It just means the passenger was extremely ignorant to assume an Ethiopian radio station was Al Jazeera (i.e. Muslim). I find all Ethiopians uniquely kind and I have a soft spot for them. This is a sad, disappointing story. I feel fairly confident it is rare. I always end up chatting with Ethiopian drivers and have never heard one relay a bad experience with a passenger in regards to their religion.

    • textdoc

      I get the feeling that the passenger might not have known/cared that the driver was Ethiopian, or known enough about Ethiopia to know anything about its religions. It might have been as simple as “dark-skinned person listening to a foreign-language radio station.” 🙁

  • textdoc

    Ugh — it sounds like this guy was a xenophobe/racist just looking for something to complain/get exercised about.

    “The male passenger said, ‘I don’t want to listen to Al Jazeera.’ The driver explained that it wasn’t. The passenger asked if the driver was Muslim, and when he said that he is, the passenger called him a mother**** terrorist.”
    .
    I suspect that if the driver had said no, he was not a Muslim, the passenger would’ve found something else to yell at him for — like, for playing a radio station aimed at Ethiopians. Or for just being an immigrant, period.

  • L.

    Trump Administration staffers settling in nicely.

    • northeazy

      statistically speaking, this guy is a registered Democrat.

      • Blithe

        That might be true if this guy is a DC resident. But since we don’t know that, I’d be interested in knowing more about what statistics you’re using here.

      • anon

        You are not good at conditional probability.

      • KellyKapowski

        Statistically speaking, the average human ha one testicle

        • bsdetector

          Kelly you are my kind of people.

        • Anon X

          Less than one, probably…. not too many 3s to balance out the male 0s and 1s. Just sayin’

  • CathedralHeightsMetro

    A few months ago I was seated at the outdoor part of a restaurant for brunch, and a 20-something woman leaving the restaurant was loudly (and by all appearances, drunkenly) yelling at her friend about something. Another couple eating outside looked over to see what the commotion was–the girl was making a huge scene; everyone was staring–and she turned her anger on them with a “what the f- are you looking at?!” tirade, which included a bunch of racist language calling them “drug dealers who shouldn’t even be here” (they were possibly Hispanic). I was so shocked that my immediate response was to yell at her, “You need to move along, NOW.” Her friend apologized and dragged her away. Like OP, it was an important reminder to me that we definitely don’t live in as much of a bubble in DC as we may assume. I wish I’d done something more, though, like at least reporting her to the restaurant so they’d never let her come back.

    • anon

      Oh, I don’t think we live in as much of a bubble here in DC as we think we do anyway. I find that people I assume aren’t racist, or shouldn’t be from what I otherwise know of them, often turn out to be when the subject of conversation turns to be about something where their beliefs and attitudes come out.
      .
      I’m not being oversensitive when I find people here to be saying racist things a lot (I’m white, for what that’s worth) – I do truly find white people I interact with in DC – I’m talking about in the social circles I interact with, not people on the street as in these examples of the cab rider and women in a restaurant – to be shockingly racist in the things they say to me, unlike most of the people I interacted with in any of the other large cities I’ve lived in as an adult. (People may have been less racist in other places, or the social scene may have been that they knew better than to spout stuff I hear here, even if they believed it.) I also find DC to be rather segregated in many areas, which may be a contributing factor.
      .
      I chalk it up to DC being the southern-most city I’ve lived in, with lots of white people from the south here (I don’t mean to be slandering white southerners, it is just a big demographic difference that I notice here), though of course it could be that racist people elsewhere are just better educated by their peer groups’ reactions about what is appropriate to say out loud. It could also be due to age demographics, as I tend to interact with more people of varying generational cohorts as I get older, necessarily adding in the generations that came of age after mine (again, not slandering members of younger generations, who I believe statistically poll better on attitudes than older generations, but I do notice a difference from those who grew up in the era of expanding civil rights – it isn’t usually the folks my age and older who are saying such stuff to me – I usually feel we’ve become worse as a culture in attitudes in my adulthood, from the Reagan years onward.)
      .
      Whatever the cause, it is a fact that I am regularly dumbfounded by racist things people say to me here, and I have no illusion that live in a non-racist bubble in DC.

      • CathedralHeightsMetro

        You’re definitely not wrong. I’ve heard plenty of comments that made me cringe from coworkers, acquaintances, and–of course–commentators on this blog over the years. 🙂 I think part of it comes from the fact, at least within my social and professional circles, that many people in DC assume that if they are liberal/Democratic-voting, well-educated, work in a nonprofit/government/”do-gooder”-type job, etc., there is no way they ever could be racist about anything, so there is no need to do any kind of introspection about the things they say/believe, or how they treat people. (I say this as a liberal myself.)

        I think what shocked me about the situation I posted was how brazen and direct the woman was, and how I was the only one who responded in any way. It was just really surreal.

        • anon

          I think you have a point about people who think they are “good” so can’t in anyway be racist.
          .
          Thinking more about why I think things have gotten worse in terms of what things people will say, I realized that media has changed so much since I was growing up. Sure, we lived in a racist country, but we all watched the same news channels, and while subtle racism was certainly there at times, overtly spoken racism wasn’t the norm (in media, anyway.) Then over the decades, along came right-wing talk radio, Fox news, and a multitude of people “speaking” in various places on the internet, and there’s a whole lot of stuff spoken in a mass media way that didn’t used to be. So people say this stuff they are hearing in media in conversations as well.
          .
          I think this is a significant change in public discourse. I didn’t discover until I was in college that both my parents hold some racist views, which I never heard a peep about growing up – which I’m thankful for, as it allowed me to grow up in a different way, without having to first hear their views and then get rid of them. I don’t think they were trying to protect us – I think many more people just didn’t feel the need to talk badly about other groups, and weren’t encouraged to by the news they viewed or listed to, or maybe by the people around them. And maybe a part of the generally church-going populace knew it wasn’t nice to talk mean about other groups of people. (But it is possible they were just too busy raising kids.)

    • DF

      I had a neighbor go off on me while I was walking the dog one day around the block. Basically said I wasn’t “from here” and “didn’t belong here”. I’m white, moved to DC 10 years ago and Petworth last year. It was a little crazy, but I’m guessing the lady was just off a bit. I didn’t say a word and let her continue cursing me off while I moved on.

  • FridayGirl

    Not nearly as scary/awful as some of these other stories, but I did yell at some GWU kids in an elevator a couple years ago for making a comment about how it smelled like “their Chinese classmates.” I was so stunned that I can’t even remember what I said when I reamed them out, except that they had no response and then I got off the elevator. So sick of people.

    • CathedralHeightsMetro

      Gross, glad you yelled at them.

  • Formerly ParkViewRes

    This isn’t just in the US. Recently I was walking with my wife and a guy in a car was making a right turn. He honked and there were 2 pedestrians in the crosswalk (walking after time had expired). I actually think the driver was honking at a car. Anyhow, one pedestrian flicked off the driver and called him a “slant eyed motherf!$?@!” I was really taken aback because Toronto is very diverse and accepting. I said okay, no need to say racist ass shit. He then said “go fu&$ yourself you white washed bitch!” Okay rude, but not exactly an insult, but maybe he thought it was since he wasn’t white himself.

  • Anon X

    Unfortunately, this sort of bigotry in DC predates the Trump Administration. It has been common for some time. People’s own bias leads them to think only Trump supporters, rednecks, blah blah would display this sort of abusive behavior. That’s not true. In my experience, a huge portion of the population would easily do something similar to this to someone about something.

    I think the issue of whether its “illegal” needs to be separated from whether anyone will do anything about it. Its probably not protected speech, not because its a threat (it might be, but it doesnt have to be) but because its harassing. BUT, given the huge incidence (referenced above) I’m not sure what exactly can be done.

    As for the wisdom of intervening – I think you just sort of have to trust the instincts of the intervener. I have a pretty high level of situational awareness and I have avoided intervention and engaged in moderate intervention depending on the variables. I dont think there’s a blanket “this is the right thing” or “this is the wrong thing”.

    I do think, overall, we need more people willing to intervene than we currently have. Even stopping and being a witness, weighing the wisdom of intervention, etc is far better than figuratively stepping over the bodies to get to work on time.

    • ST21

      Very well said.

    • navyard

      A few weeks ago, I was at a lecture at the Air and Space museum (typically a very educated audience). The lady next to me was trying to direct other people to move in so that others could be seated. This is okay to do….once. But the lady next to me started telling the people behind in a very animated way (crazy) that they needed to move over. Eventually the elderly lady behind me said something (in a very slight Germanic accent) to the effect of “please stop pointing your finger in my face and turn around and pay attention” . The speaker was already speaking and the crazy lady beside me was being disruptive. The two kind of got into it with words like “you’re not the boss of me” and “you’re being very rude”. Finally the lady next to me said “why don’t you go back to your own country”. At that point, I just said “Oh no, we don’t do that here” and kept repeating “that is NOT okay here” and the crazy red-hair lady tried to engage me by saying “but don’t you think that’s rude?” Because the speaker was speaking and I didn’t want to ruin the talk or draw more attention, I just said “I’m not going to discuss this with you” and the episode ended.
      But I really wished I had called her out more publicly and maybe even gotten her kicked out of the museum. FFS, this was a lecture about exploring other worlds, and this crazy red-haired biatch wanted to win her argument by telling someone else they weren’t welcome. It was pretty upsetting.

    • textdoc

      This kind of behavior definitely isn’t new… but it does seem to have increased since the election, “awareness bias” notwithstanding.* I think the election results emboldened people with this mindset to be more vocal.

      * On “awareness bias” — a FiveThirtyEight article I was linking to in a different PoPville thread notes:
      .
      “[H]eightened news coverage of hate incidents after the election may have encouraged people to report incidents that they would not have otherwise reported. This is called awareness bias — a trend that is well-established in epidemiology, environmental health and other fields of research that frequently use self-reported data.”
      .
      https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/higher-rates-of-hate-crimes-are-tied-to-income-inequality/

  • ST21

    Glad you intervened. Unfortunate that there are idiots like this out there- can’t say I’m surprised though. I have seen this type of behavior to cabbies for years now, people are just ignorant and I don’t see that changing anytime soon. Luckily they are in the minority now- still believe that people are inherently good.

  • MadMax

    I heard the guy on the sidewalk yell, “Yeah, well you’re the terrorist!” I then said, “Wait, did you just call him a terrorist? You can’t do that.”
    ———————
    Like it or not, yes, he absolutely can do that. Zero laws are violated in that statement. It’s an ignorant thing to say, sure, but so is your assertion.

    • houseintherear

      Commenting just to hear yourself comment. Nicely done.

      • MadMax

        Back atcha’.

    • anonabeer

      Like it or not, yes, you absolutely can take everything anyone says to a strange degree of literal. It’s annoying thing to do, sure, but you are the one who ends up looking like an jerk.

      • anonabeer

        *a jerk…

      • MadMax

        You’re right, I can. It’s not like The Internet is running out of space, and there’s already enough of an echo chamber here.

    • Anon X

      I think you misunderstand free speech. There are obviously times you can say “yeah, well you’re the terrorist!” and it is protected, but there are plenty of scenarios where you cant. I’m guessing, based on the context offered by the OP, that this is one of those “you cant do that” times.

      • MadMax

        I’m completely aware of the limitations of free speech, so we’ll just have to disagree on that.

        • Anon X

          Fun fact… its not subjective. So you can disagree, but harassing speech isnt protected. Feel free to disagree with gravity, too.

          • dcd

            “I’m guessing, based on the context offered by the OP, that this is one of those “you cant do that” times.”
            .
            That seems subjective to me. Fun fact.

          • MadMax

            I tell you what, once this guy gets prosecuted based on the evidence you read second-hand then I’ll be sure to mea culpa.

    • west_egg

      Dude, this is pedantic even by your standards.

  • d

    I saw quite a few MAGA hats and shirts in Dupont this weekend, so figured there was some kind of event in town. Could be this couple was airbnb’ing from our of town given how far outside the norm this behavior is for DC residents.

    • ST21

      It’s really not far outside the norm, man. I’ve seen it for years from people of all color- white, black, brown, etc. Automatically blaming a Trump supporter is too convenient- this sort of stuff ain’t new.

    • AnonCT

      That’s just not true… this happened well before Trump and will continue happening well after Trump. Quit thinking that DCites (generally liberals) are 100% pure. Just further stoking the partisan divide is all you’re doing.

      • ST21

        Yup- couldn’t agree more.

    • CathedralHeightsMetro

      I don’t think it’s that far outside the norm for DC residents? Plenty of racism/xenophobia exists among us liberal elites–we just smugly like to believe otherwise and assume that only “ignorant” redneck Trump voters would behave this way.

    • HaileUnlikely

      Agreed. And while there was no description of the offender here other than that he was a man and was with a woman, I’d note that no one race has a monopoly on unkindness to immigrants. I have an Ethiopian neighbor (a man in his forties) who was attacked several years ago by a group of African American teenagers and/or young adults who called him all sorts of xenophobic things while they beat him.

  • good!

    I’m not reading through any of these comments because I only want to say to you: good job!!! If we don’t call this sh*t out when we see it, this “silent majority” will continue to become more bold. Very brave – and YES, WE SHOULD PAT EACH OTHER ON THE BACKS FOR DOING THE GOOD AND CORRECT THING! It’s ok to be self-congratulatory, it’s ok to thank each other for taking care of each other. We might all be in a similar position one day, so letting people know that we are impressed with each other when we call this stuff out is so so important.

  • melissa

    I’ve heard both Uber drivers and taxi drivers complain about racists. Seems to be silly to assume that the people going on racist tirades are DC residents. We are one of the largest tourist spots in the country, and there’s some sort of “free speech” event going on almost every weekend. Yes, they are smaller than the “resist” events, but they are about 20 times more vocal.

    I like the anectdote where the woman said “We don’t do that here” at the lecture.

    Next time I see a racist as*, that’s going to be my thing. Closer to the election, I witnessed an incident in a Rite-Aid, where a bunch of us told the offender to leave the victim alone. But “we don’t do that here” is a great way to position the offender as an outsider, who simply doesn’t know better. Like maybe they weren’t ever taught to live and let live. I will use that one next time.

    • textdoc

      On the “We don’t do that here” — that makes me think of this great anecdote the Prince originally posted in 2008:
      .
      “My father is a very proud New Yorker. So one day he sees a cab driver pull over to the curb and throw out a bottle of questionable content. So my dad bombs over to the guy and says ‘this is New York City! We don’t do that in New York City!’. And the guy apologizes and throws out the bottle in a garbage can. There have been so many times when I’ve wanted to bomb over to cars or people who are littering and say – this is Washington, DC! We don’t do that in Washington, DC!'”
      .
      https://www.popville.com/2008/07/i-choose-to-believe-there-is-beer-in-those-bottles/

  • anon

    I would think he should be able to report it? Not sure what the difference is for a regular DC cab vs. Uber/Lyft… but one of my friends was actually banned/reported by Uber in Indiana. I wasn’t in the car when it happened, but essentially my friends were having a somewhat politically charged conversation amongst themselves when the driver butted in and said something insulting. My friends were a bit tipsy, and one of them asked, “well, have you ever thought that your opinion could be due to your white privilege?” The driver slammed on the breaks and kicked them out of the car in the middle of no where at 3am. A few days later she received an email stating she had been racist and was banned from Uber!! Regardless, what that guy said is disrespectful and disgusting. I hope if no legal action can be taken, Karma catches up with him!

  • dcanon

    I would think he should be able to report it? Not sure what the difference is for a regular DC cab vs. Uber/Lyft… but one of my friends was actually banned/reported by Uber in Indiana. I wasn’t in the car when it happened, but essentially my friends were having a somewhat politically charged conversation amongst themselves when the driver butted in and said something insulting. My friends were a bit tipsy, and one of them asked, “well, have you ever thought that your opinion could be due to your white privilege?” The driver slammed on the breaks and kicked them out of the car in the middle of no where at 3am. A few days later she received an email stating she had been racist and was banned from Uber!! Regardless, what that guy said is disrespectful and disgusting. I hope if no legal action can be taken, Karma catches up with him!

  • Brooklyn Brawler

    Clicked on here just to scroll the comments and guess that MadMax & Northeazy were in the comments. Since this topic was dealing with race I knew I would see them here smh

  • 10thSt

    Mister Rogers famously shared his mother’s advice: in moments of crisis, look for the “helpers”. There will always be crisis but in those moments, there will always be helpers, those who step in and lend a hand, too. The helpers give us hope. Thank you for being a helper 🙂

  • Anonymous

    I think “being vigilant and doing what you can” is a great idea, but it needs to go beyond policing the words and actions of strangers. You need to speak up and say something when your family, friends, co-workers, acquaintances say objectionable things as well.

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