More Staggering Development – Check Out the Changes at 4th and M St, SE from April to Today

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4th and M St, SE looking towards the river

It had been a couple months since I stopped by Navy Yard and this development made my jaw drop. Holy huge progress.

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Looking towards the Capitol

And only eight months ago:

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April 2013

10 Comment

  • I live nearby but had not been over there in a couple of weeks, and my jaw dropped too! They did a lot quickly.

  • I can’t wait till they open the Harris Teeter!

  • too bad they didn’t keep that little brick structure on the corner, that is as “DC” as it gets.

    • Didn’t they? Since the pictures were takin from different perspectives, my sense from the pictures is that the brick turret and wall were kept. I’m just basing my assumptions on the pictures though.

    • They did. It’s considered a historic structure or something. Don’t make assumptions.

    • I went by 4th & M this past weekend and it was still there.

      I’m pretty sure they are keeping it, if nothing for the whole “keep something from old design” aspect.

      • they actually removed the tiles during much of the construction, refinished and placed them back on the turret after the bulk of the construction directly above was complete – i assume to protect it. as others have mentioned, there are historical considerations. i’m curious to see the final result with the new glass/modern building and the brick wall and turret.

  • I walk by this every day and didn’t realize how quickly it was going up! They did keep all of the brick wall on M St, including the guard turret. They had to because it’s considered a historic structure. They’ve actually been doing a really impressive job rebuilding/repairing that wall by hand. Because its historic, they’ve actually had to recreate the same mortar that was used in the 1800s.

    • Wow @ re-creating mortar from the 1800s. I guess the patent office would keep any patents on mortar mixing dating back that far? Or is there some other way to find out how they mixed mortar in the 1800s? That’s laudable attention to detail.

      • I would imagine they just tested a chunk of it to see what it was composed of and then recreated it. You really can’t tell the difference between the new and the old when you walk by. It’s pretty fantastic. And mad props to the developer for using all concrete construction rather than the sticks going on top of the Petworth Safeway.

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