20 Comment

  • I’m of a cultural group that wear turbans and long hair, including facial hair. Seeing the Fojol brothers in their costumes make my stomach fall to the ground. Whether or not their intent was to be, to me they are racist at worst or culturally insensitive at best. I don’t buy their explanations that it is just in good fun when it’s at my people’s expense. I’m disappointed the Smithsonian, known for being culturally inclusive, picked these guys. And can you use another picture on this site so we don;t have to look at them?

    • thank you! I have always thought these guys were totally racist pricks. when I tried to talk to them about it once, they were such pinheaded flakes. plus, their food SUCKS!

    • Wait – lemme get this straight – this is an indian food truck being run by some white guys in costume? honest question, I’ve never tried/seen it. If this is true then *cringe.

      I’m not sure people would be so excited if it were a few white guys running a ‘mr. jackson’s southern bbq truck’ in costume… or one of the other hundred offensive scenarios I can think of…

    • Have you at least considered that you may be a bit oversensitive about this? There is a pretty big difference between intentionally making a mockery of one’s culture, and dressing up in colorful costumes.

      • WOW.

        I could definitely be wrong but if Anon 12:12 is Sikh then I imagine his inherent response to your ridiculous question will be one of understanding and patience… unlike mine…

      • My girlfriend and I tried Fojol Brothers during the Thievery show on the waterfront. She’s Indian, and I’ve been exposed to her culture long enough to pick up on racist undertones, but neither of us gave the costumes a second thought. Don’t they also wear big red clown noses too? I thought they were just being silly and fun.

        • right. so if I want to sell soul food and I wear blackface to do it, but I make sure it’s “gotcha” blackface, like I wear a clown nose or exaggerated colors, is that okay?

  • totally agree with the above. plus, to call them one of the best food trucks in the country is an insult to taco trucks everywhere.

  • ok, I just looked at the whole list. this is a list of hipster food trucks, not food trucks. personally, I think the Korean dumplings you get from the cart on 79th & broadway in NYC outrank most of the foodtrucks I’ve tried. not to mention egg & cheese on a kaiser roll …

    • oh wow we got through 15 replies without some jerk posting that the food trucks are better in NY.

      how about pizza – what do you think of that? how does dc pizza compare to brooklyn’s?

  • I don’t think Fojol Bros. is one of the top half-dozen food trucks in D.C., much less among the top 20 in the country. (The better food trucks — I’ve patronized 26 so far in DC — have lunchtime fare that outshines many of their brick-and-mortar counterparts.) They have the most attractive truck paint job and operators with goofy outfits, but that’s about it. The one time I tried Fojols’ Indian cuisine, it did not rate any better than what one could get at a mid-level downtown Indian buffet (although, in fairness, we have none of these in SW Federal Ghetto).

  • binpetworth

    Damn, that Viking Soul Food truck looks good.

  • Eaten this food twice and was not impressed at all. The fojol bros definitely had a hipster thing going on. I remember they were playing good music. Probably won’t eat this again.

  • Fojol is awesome and they are really nice people. They certainly don’t deserve the sort of abuse they are getting here. Talk about cringeworthy. I don’t know why I even bother looking at blog comments anymore, people in this city mostly make me cringe.

  • I’d rate Tasty Kabob the best food truck in D.C. – at least that I’ve sampled.

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