4 Comment

  • northeazy

    I read the pipeline doesnt cross tribal lands, the Army Corp of Engineers spoke with affected communities hundreds of times, and that pipelines are a safer alternative than trucks or trains. Why the protest?

    • A lot of it is optics–moving a pipeline away from a crossing potentially affecting a heavily large white city up stream to a continued marginalized and largely ignored group of people downstream doesn’t play well. There are also environmental concerns with our continued support of oil and gas infrastructure, but that isn’t going anywhere.

      Both sides have conveniently ignored relevant facts that make their position more tenuous. The current pipeline crossing is virtually in the exact same location (albiet quite a bit lower in depth) as three other utility and oil lines, so it is not like the finally crossing is some unused land. As far as I know, there were no protests for those previous installations. The lone North Dakota US Representative met with tribal leaders with oil executives on multiple occasions, brought experts to map out sacred grounds, but this fact is ignored. The oil executives say they had outreach to tribal leaders, but like I find with my own family, if you don’t actually do something to address the concerns mentioned, “hearing” isn’t enough.