Today’s Rental has a “Combo Washer & Dryer in the Unit is on working condition but if it goes bad landlord will not fix or replace it”

1125 12th Street Northwest

This rental is located at 1125 12th Street, Northwest. The listing says:

“Condo in great location close to metro & Bus lines. MCI Center, China town and all great Bars and Restaurants on K St.wood Floor, Granite Counter-top. Rent Fee includes electricity, Water/Sewer and trash Removal. Combo Washer & Drayer in the Unit is on working condition but if it goes bad landlord will not fix or replace it . There are Pay public Washer/Dryer in Basement too.”

Rental

You can see more photos here.

This 1 bed/1 bath is going for $1,749/Mo.

47 Comment

  • MCI Center? Someone hasn’t been downtown in a long while.

  • Pretty sure that caveat about the washer/dryer is illegal under DC landlord/tenant law.

    • justinbc

      Nope, a working washer and dryer is not something you have to provide tenants.

      • Someone on here said once you provide it you do have to keep it in working order. So if the place never had one, fine, but if you provide it then you must maintain it. Honestly, I would not want to have a landlord that puts this in the description.

        • +1. But then again, pretty much every landlord I’ve ever had has been somewhere on the spectrum of “meh” to “nightmare from hell.” So, this sounds par for the course.

        • I’m pretty sure you’re correct. Generally speaking besides cleanliness and maybe yard work, the landlord has to keep the place in the same condition as when you arrived.

        • Same. This is just skimming the surface of what will likely be a horrible year

      • Under DC L&T law, if a rental accommodation has a feature or amenity it has to remain in working order or if it’s removed the tenant is entitled to a rent decrease. This has nothing to do with a washer/dryer being required in the first place.

  • I Dont Get It

    I’m confused by the before and after pictures of the bedroom Is that before/after you store your extra clothing in downtown DC’s tiniest refrigerator because the washer is broken? That’s crazy!

  • Is it a violation of building regulations to have an in-unit washer/dryer (ie this was done under the radar)? I looked at a condo (albeit in MD) that had one and the agent noted that it wasn’t supposed to have one, so if it ever broke you wouldn’t be able to get a new one in (I guess unless you got it delivered in the middle of the night, made sure no one saw you, etc).

    • If that’s a dc law, it’s being broken, A LOT!

      • No I mean a particular condo building. Some might have a rule in the condo docs against having in-unit washer/dryers.

        • Awww yea that’s possible (unlikely imo), but that wouldn’t stop ll from fixing it just from replacing it. Not something I’d mention in the ad in either case.
          If ll doesn’t want to be bothered, just take it out. Problem solved.

        • HaileUnlikely

          I would have thought this too, given that the building also has pay laundry machines in the basement. However, a quick look on Zillow shows several other units for rent that advertise in-unit laundry and have a picture of the same exact machine.

  • I often think people over-fret about staging to the point of fussiness, but really….
    this place is so junky looking that it looks like I already live there.
    And that is not a positive thing.

  • pretty cool that this place comes with a time machine too, so that you can visit the MCI center.

  • If the landlord states that they won’t maintain the washer/dryer, I’d have my doubts that anything else would get fixed either. No thanks.

  • maxwell smart

    I have yet to find one of these washer/dryer combo units that actually does a remotely decent job, especially when it comes to drying clothes. The times I have had to use one, I found I needed to hang dry everything, as the “dryer” function only seemed capable of getting everything really hot, but not actually any less damp.

    • yup. We had one in our tiny NYC apartment, and it was handy for washing things like socks, undergarments, t-shirts, etc. But everything had to be hung to dry, and if you had clothes that were really dirty or needed extra attention, nope. Take it to a professional or a laundromat.

    • Yep same. Absolutely hated having one of those combination units and will never ever go that route again.

    • I had the same thought and in my experience these units are not vented (the hot, moisture filled air isnt released and the clothes just tumble around in it). maybe this person is just hedging because they know it doesn’t work like the next tenant expects.

    • Really? I have an LG combo and I’ve been using it for 4 months now and absolutely love it. I pile clothes in when I leave for work and when I return they’re completely done. It takes a little longer than a normal separate machine (maybe 5 hours? I only run it when I’m sleeping or away so I’m not sure) but I’m absent minded and not having to remember or be home to put my clothes in the dryer is a game changer for me. I absolutely hate doing clothes and this makes the process close to painless. Wouldn’t recommend it for more than one or two people though

      • I’m not as familiar with the combo units, so does it operate differently in a way that wouldn’t make it a fire hazard? Obviously with any dryer you want to keep up with maintenance, keep the lint trap clean, etc. to minimize the hazard but you’re never supposed to leave the dryer running when not home with traditional models. I guess if there’s no vent or exhaust duct then lint can’t get caught in there so maybe that avoids the issue.

        • Don’t know about this specific LG model, but combination units in the past had condensing dryers. It works like an air conditioner and sucks the water out that way. They need a drain, not a vent, they don’t heat the air. I have heard a major downside of this method is very wrinkly clothes. There were, and maybe still are, combo models that used a conventional way of heating the air, and thus required a vent. Me personally, I hang dry most of my clothes on racks anyway, so I’d rather just have a washer and no dryer rather than one appliance that doesn’t do either job very well.

          • Mine does not require a vent and my clothes are not wrinkled when I get home unless I leave them in there for an additional day (which, ashamedly, I have done).
            .
            The only downside I’ve found is you can’t stop the machine during the drying part and restart it. So if you have some clothes you want to dry just long enough to get the wrinkles out and others you want to run through the whole drying cycle you have to put them in separate loads. I’m not sure if that is specific to my model.

  • Sounds like the washer’s broken 🙂

    • Yeah. And the tenant will be stuck with a non-functional appliance taking up space in a tiny kitchen.

  • Seems highly likely to be an absentee landlord situation given references to the MCI Center (lol) and the bars on K Street. I can’t totally tell if it’s a 1 br or a studio? Considering the location + water/electricity being included it’s a good price for a 1br. If it’s a studio it’s not a steal but it’s not that outrageous for the location.

    • It’s a 1-bedroom but in name only. I’ve looked at a unit in this building (years ago when they were a lot less pricey) and they are tiny. You could fit a bed in the bedroom and that’s it, and you’d roll out of bed into the living area.

      Also, just an FYI, but I walk my dog past here all the time and there seem to be a lot of corporate rentals in the building, so a lot of turnover. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it can mean security issues with keys or fobs, etc.

  • The design decisions for that kitchen are making me irrationally mad. Why would you put a combo washer/dryer IN THE KITCHEN and then have that tiny fridge outside of it in the living room? I guess at one time the washer/dryer was (an even tinier) dorm fridge? Was there ever a full-size fridge in that kitchen?

  • I don’t find anything wrong with the landlord not fixing the washer/dryer if it breaks. I assumed that the unit doesn’t come with a washer/dryer, but the current tenant bought one, doesn’t feel like lugging it out when he moves, so the landlord said “if the next tenant wants it, he can keep it, but it’s not part of the unit”. It’s not much different from buying curtains from the last tenant. They already fit the windows, but certainly not the responsibility of the landlord. The comment itself made me think the landlord might be MORE accommodating, not less. But who knows?

    Also, +1 to the mess. People — and this goes for everyone — we don’t need twelve different spatulas. We only have two hands, and we really only need one spatula. If you are cooking multiple things at the same time, just wipe the spatula off! And put that SINGLE spatula in a drawer. Kitchen utensils are NOT decorative, so please get them out of the vase and off your countertops. /rant over.

    • Not sure if

    • Oops, posted prematurely.
      .
      Not sure if you saw the combo washer/dryer in the kitchen photos, but it’s the kind that fits under a kitchen counter. I would be very surprised if the tenant had purchased it him/herself — if it were a portable model, that would be more plausible.

    • You’re assuming a tenant-to-tenant transaction, but that’s not the way the listing frames it. And unless there’s some evidence that’s missing here, you’re wrong under DC law. With the exception of consumables like light bulbs, if the unit comes with something, it has to remain with that service or facility or some other accommodation has to be made. Blinds, washing machine, stripper pole, it doesn’t matter. The price of the unit is driven at least partially driven by the fact that it has this (admittedly crappy) machine, and the law is that it must be repaired by the landlord. And who actually bought it is irrelevant. If the tenant left if and the landlord is using it to advertise and set a price for the unit it becomes part of the deal.

    • Wow, what an odd thing over which to get worked up. Sometimes more than one spatula is needed and as for not keeping everything in drawers, you’re assuming everyone has space to keep everything they use in drawers. In a kitchen with limited drawer space, putting large utensils in a caddy makes a lot of sense. I’ve even lived in apartments when younger where I had to put my silverware in a caddy on a shelf for lack of drawer space. It sounds like you may be dealing with a very narrow frame of reference.

      • I have many, many spatulas, spoons, etc. because I cook a lot, and I despise hand washing dishes, so there are always several in the dishwasher already. I’m not worked up over the washer issue either. I had an apartment with no guarantee on the fridge, but this was not in DC.

        • Yeah, DC is quite different than other cities where I’ve lived when it comes to the expectation of a washer/dryer in every rental unit. It is absolutely a great convenience, but there was a point when just having laundry in the building was a luxury for me. Of course with the lack of laundromats around the District, you pretty much need to have them in the buildings or units at this point.

          • Exactly on the laudromat lack. Places like NYC where washer/dryers don’t come standard have Laundromats, many of which include wash and fold services, on every corner. DC has…well, I see one once in a while, but I’ve never had one reasonably near where I lived over the 12 years I’ve lived here. When I lived in Queens I schlepped my huge bag of laundry around the corner every week to the wash and fold, picked it up after work, and it wasn’t that big a deal.

  • It looks to me as though this is a junior one-bedroom, not a real one-bedroom.
    .
    I’m not 100% sure, but it looks like there are no windows in the kitchen/living room… which is why there are French doors between the bedroom and the living room.

    • You are correct about there being a french doors between the couch and the bed, but there is definitely a window in the living area. Looks like the covered it up with a big flat screen.

    • There also seems to be a small window in the kitchen. And it seems that Mary Tyler Moore’s “M” is hanging on the kitchen wall over the dishwasher.

  • Sparta

    Many units in this building are leased through a property company that specializes in furnished, temporary rentals. Each unit is individually owned and when I stayed there on a temporary lease, the owner overrode the property management company and refused to allow it to repair my non-working toilet because he wanted to fix it. The owner did not come to fix the toilet for a week (by which time I had already had a lawyer write a letter to the property management company). When he came, he arrived at 10:30 p.m. on a week night. I was a single woman living in the unit and would not have let him in at that time except that I had a large dog who kept him at a proper distance from me. The place is poorly rehab’d–the walls and floors are tissue-thin and so very noisy if there are neighbors who do things like put away dishes and run the garbage disposal. The owner of my unit also had been too cheap to put in a proper closet rack and had a collapsable clothes container that, well, collapsed and was beyond repair. Renter beware.

  • Yeah, if something is working at the time of rental, the LL is obligated to repair it. LLs don’t have to provide a washer and dryer but if you do, you must fix it.

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