From the Forum – Scam or Not? door to door collection for desceased elderly couple?

Photo by PoPville flickr user mlckeeperkeeper

door to door collection for desceased elderly couple?

“I just had two people come to my door collecting money for the deceased elderly couple (The Jenkinsons’ they said, from the neighborhood). They had a Tupperware container with a hole cut in it and newspaper obituary clipping taped to the top… Felt like a scam so I turned them away… Anyone know anything about the Jenkinsons or why these folks would be collecting money for them?”

You can see all forum topics and add your own here.   If you are having trouble uploading your question to the forum please try clearing your cache. If it still doesn’t work please email me at princeofpetworth(at)gmail

27 Comment

  • Sounds like a scam. Either way, the Jenkinsons have left this vale of tears. Hallelujah!

  • if it looks like a scam, and it smells like a scam… it’s probably a scam.

  • “I just had two people come to my door collecting money for….”

    That’s all I had to read. Scam.

  • There’s no way this wasn’t a scam.

  • They’re dead, why do they need money? Scam

    • When people die, you can’t just haul them over to the Ft. Totten Transfer Station. You’ve got to do something with the body, generally bury it or burn it, and that something costs money.

  • We’ve been over this before. Any time someone comes around asking you for money for anything, it’s a scam. They might legitimately need money but it’s not for the reason they’re telling you.

  • Scam. And I usually call the police with a description right after I turn them away.

  • skj84

    When in doubt it’s usually a scam.

  • Scam.

    anyone asks you for everything = scam

  • You could always ask to take their photo first. If they balk, it’s a scam.

  • Accountering

    I read the first line. Its a scam. If they come to your door asking for money, its a scam.

  • They were probably casing your joint for a future break-in. Lock those doors tight!

  • When I lived in Park View, it was not uncommon for the old timers to do this when an elderly neighbor passed in order to help the family with funeral expenses. Can’t say whether this particular case is a scam or not, but it certainly is an argument for getting to know your neighbors.

    • Would they ask known neighbors though? I feel it would be odd to ask for burial money for a person you did not know.

      • Can’t say. I knew them, but I don’t know whether they also approached neighbors they did not know. My only point is that if you make an effort to get to know your neighbors, it would be easier to judge whether something like this is a scam or not.

    • We are good friends with a long time resident and he regularly gave us examples of how much he disliked another semi-long time resident that is our neighbor. He told us the story of how she went door-to-door to collect $ for an elderly resident that passed away. Apparently she kept all the money for herself. Can’t confirm this but I would be hesitant to give money unless you are confident the money will go the family in question. Probably better to find out a way to contribute more directly to the grieving family.

  • The Jenkinsons were dear, dear people. Your cold hearts will never know their warmth. And I was giving you all a chance to repent, before it’s too late…

    It is I going door to door on behalf of these dear, departed people — pillars of our community, to be sure. Maybe asking for money strikes you as odd, perhaps even scam-ish. But you couldn’t be more wrong. The Jenkinsons asked me to do this, personally, on their death bed. Yes, that’s death bed, singular — for as carefree as the Jenkinsons were with their love, they were tight with their wallets. This partly explains the need for the cash.

    Also, when I ask to make a quick imprint of your credit card, this is entirely legitimate. The Jenkinsons were big collectors of cards, greeting and otherwise.

    I’m almost offended when some of you, upon answering your doors, crinkle up your noses and foreheads when I hand over power-of-attorney forms. It’s not like I’m asking you to sign over your homes. Mrs. Jenkinson always wants to go to law school and simply never found the time for it. But by gathering power-of-attorney forms from friends and neighbors, she was able to get that much closer to her dream. And all you people care about is stomping on those dreams, even in death. FOR SHAME.

    What’s more, some of you have even threatened to call the police when I shoulder my way through your doorways and begin rummaging for jewelry and electronics. The Jenkinsons may be gone, but do you want to sit shiva in silence? With a bunch of jewelry-free mourners? The Jenkinsons would be spinning over in their grave. Grave, not graves, given the aforementioned tight-fistedness with the cash.

    I’ll be coming back around tonight. Make sure the good silver is out and polished.

  • I was first introduced to the custom of collecting money after someone died to assist the family with related expenses when I lived in another city. I’ve since encountered it several times, in DC and elsewhere. It’s not necessarily a scam, but of course it could be a scam perpetrated on the basis of a legitimate long-held custom. Really no way to know.

  • They both died?

  • The Jenkinsons were a powerful and wealthy people living in exile after being forced to leave their native country. They left a large amount with a large amount in offshore bank accounts and designated myself, The Right Honorable Richard Roll, L..O.B., ESQ, to which I am the designated beneficiary. However, in order to access this large sum, the bank requires a transfer fee in advance, which I am unable to provide because all of my funds are tied up in illiquid investments. If you transfer to me the sum of $10,000, I will gladly provide you with 10% of the $50,000,000 USD, which I expect to receive within 72 hours.

  • Even if it is a scam, what’s 1 or 2 dollars? Who would honestly go door-to-door with a random person’s obit? Once a woman came to my door handing our flyers for her disabled and missing niece who was asking for donations to help print more fliers. I gave her a few dollars – a small amount of money I won’t miss. In case it was a scam, I don’t care, but would have kicked myself if this woman really was looking for her missing niece and needed help with someone as small as printing flyers.

  • This is sad to me.. because once upon a time, communities DID indeed rally around families in need… LIkely not strangers, but communities supported one another… to read the jokes on here saddens me and reminds me that people are getting more and more detached.. people talk about community on this website all the time and yet can’t wait to cry foul at the first opportunity… I’m with Reality’s post… Good G-d, people

Comments are closed.