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“This is to inform you that a Big Brown bat in Ward 1, was determined rabid by the DC Department of Health”

by Prince Of Petworth June 2, 2014 at 10:55 am 5 Comments

bat_rabies_alert_dc
Bat visiting Woodley Park in 2012

Uh…

From an email:

“This is to inform you that a Big Brown bat in Ward 1, was determined rabid by the DC Department of Health on May 28, 2014. The animal was picked up on May 22 from the following addresses:

Bat – male adult Big Brown, found inside the bedroom of an apartment on May 22 at the 2000 blk of 16th St. NW in Ward 1. A similar situation involving a bat developed a week ago when a human/pet exposure resulted in the same general area in Ward 1.

Attached are flyers on Rabies and Animal Control Laws to the District’s residents. This is a message of prevention and caution on approaching any suspicious animals including loose cats and dogs in that area. Pet owners who allow cats and dogs to run at large in the woods expose their pets to possible Rabies transmission and Lyme disease, which can also be transmitted to humans.

Brochure-Rabies (PDF)

Brochure-Animal Control Laws (PDF)

Moreover, the following is pertinent information to assist the residents with advise on exclusionary methods, such as securing trash cans and other food sources, repairing and patching holes in attics and block crawl spaces such as porches and sheds against intrusion of wildlife. Wild animals are attracted to food waste. Thus sanitation issues should be prevented. The city does not to remove an animal from its habitat, unless sick or injured. Therefore, it’s important for residents to read our flyers for tips to discourage the proximity of urban wildlife into their properties and learn about signs of abnormal behavior.

Thank you,

Maria Hille
Supervisory Biologist, M.S., Animal Disease Control/HRLA
DC Department of Health / Government of the District of Columbia”

  • Bnon

    What the Grammar?

    Thus sanitation issues should be prevented. The city does not to remove an animal from its habitat, unless sick or injured.

  • 17thSter

    So scary. I had a bat in my bedroom when I was 17. This was rural Connecticut. I still remember it flying around. My Dad hit it with a baseball bat the next day. Not sure it was rabid, which makes the situation even more scary.

  • textdoc

    “Moreover, the following is pertinent information to assist the residents with advise on exclusionary methods, such as securing trash cans and other food sources, repairing and patching holes in attics and block crawl spaces such as porches and sheds against intrusion of wildlife.”
    .
    I didn’t see any such “pertinent information,” but the bit about “securing trash cans” reminds me of my general beef with DPW over its issuing trash cans that don’t latch in any way. (I keep bricks on top of my trash/recycling bins to keep rats from getting in, but nobody else on my alley does.) When I asked about this at the Ward 1 Rat Summit, DPW gave some flimsy-sounding excuse about needing to make sure that seniors could open/close the trash cans. Hmm, I wonder if anyone in the D.C. government is getting kickbacks from the manufacturer of the current trash/recycling bins?

    • Spraying the inside of your bin with ammonia is also effective for keeping several different kinds of pests away.

  • StatingTheObvious

    One thing I’ve learned from my Texas family is that if you see a bat that’s disoriented or flying around in daylight, it’s most likely rabid. In general, rabies is very common in bats–and yet another reason your cat should be indoors, not outside.

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