Protest at P Street Whole Foods


A reader reports:

“I’m not sure what was going on exactly, but there was some sort of protest at the P street Whole Foods around 1:30pm. All of a sudden people just started chanting near a hummus display in front of the cookies. The police probably arrived in less than 2 minutes and told the protest leader they had to get out of the store, then they marched out single file, yelling their chant, and stood outside. The whole foods staff was pretty great about the incident — the check out lines kept moving….”

55 Comment

  • Until every chickpea is free, or at least reduced price.

  • MVT

    This reminds me of the poster in Roti that advertises “free range chickpeas”

  • phl2dc

    “All of a sudden people just started chanting near a hummus display in front of the cookies.”

    Anyone else amused by this sentence or is it just me?

  • “All of a sudden people just started chanting near a hummus display in front of the cookies.”
    Ha. I love how the person doesn’t know what the protest was about, but definitely knows it was near the cookies.

  • Oh my. Cargo shorts with ankle high black socks and black shoes? It’s not clothing, it’s violence.

  • It was a really strange protest! I was mostly annoyed because they were, ironically, RIGHT in front of the almond milk and I didn’t want to push my way through to get to it. I was at the fish counter, buying a piece of salmon for the non-vegetarian in my house, and the guy working the counter was a riot. “Only thing they’re accomplishing is lookkng like idiots! Why don’t they go protest at Safeway or Giant where you can’t even trace the source of their products!?”

    • justinbc

      Because they probably live near Logan Circle and want to be activists but not THAT activists enough that it requires walking any further.

    • Being inconvenienced at WF’s fish counter is really too first world a problem for words.

      • I live in a first world country and have a decent job and a roof over my head, so I suppose all of my problems are “first world problems.” I guess all of us who live here and make a decent life for ourselves have nothing but first world problems. I won’t apologize for that.

        I wasn’t inconvenienced in the least. I was simply telling a lighthearted story of the fish monger’s jovial attitude towards the protesters.

        Not everything has to be a dig towards someone else. Lighten up.

      • An before you assume that my paents paid for me to go to college, used connections so that I could get a job, and then paid for my house, get over it. I paid for college, got my job on my merits, and paid for my home with the money my husband and I earned ourselves.

    • “I was mostly annoyed because they were, ironically, RIGHT in front of the almond milk and I didn’t want to push my way through to get to it.” The mention of the almond milk also makes this a very D.C. post. 🙂
      (Not dissing almond milk or those who purchase/consume it — I bought some just last week when the store was out of soy milk. But it reminds me of something I posted on Facebook just before a snowstorm, speculating that Whole Foods was probably out of soy milk, recycled toilet paper, and whole-grain bread.)


  • nightborn

    This seems annoying. A display like that would’ve just made me want to pick up a bunch of meat and wave it at them.

  • Possibly the best Stuff White People Like post ever.

  • accendo

    I certainly hope these are free-range protesters!

  • Darn, I was just a block away. Given WF’s pretenses about a lot of things, including sourcing, I’d say they got the protest & protesters they deserved.

  • “Demonstrators protest ‘food violence’ blocks from the White House”

  • goaldigger

    I’ve often wanted to riot at the P St WF but because of their high prices, narrow aisles, long check out lines and self-centered shoppers (only the Yes! stores are a worst shopping experience!)

    • That Whole Foods is the worst. I shop at the Georgetown Location which is much easier to navigate, but you’re surrounded by the annoyingly-privileged Georgetown and/or diplomatic types.

      • the P street shoppers are just as annoying privileged as the Georgetown shoppers.
        For those that have been in DC long enough, there is no longer a difference between the residents of Georgetown and most residents in the Logan area. Both are equally privileged, especially if you see them in Whole Foods. I think the whole Georgetown = douchy stereotype is no longer relevant.

        • orderedchaos

          “I think the whole Georgetown = douchy stereotype is no longer relevant.”

          Oh, it’s still quite relevant—though other neighborhoods are catching up.

      • The layout of the Foggy Bottom location is even worse. Those aisles are really narrow, and trying to navigate that and find things is like finding stuff in any given Yes! store.

  • Slow protest day

  • In some parts of the world people wonder if they’ll make it through the day, here we protest eggs that we can get in a ridiculously expensive and air conditioned grocery store. #OnePercentProblems

  • This is silly yuppie crap. These people should take their energy and efforts and get involved in the communities of Shaw / Petworth. Mentor gang members and street thugs out of a life of crime.

  • All I wanted to do was get to the bulk foods aisle.

    So the protestors came in the entrance quietly, walked behind the registers, up the food bar aisle, and then to the back of the store, where the meat is opposite the hummus and cookies display. 🙂 I’m not sure how they exited, but when they did, they lined up in front of the store and continued chanting for animal liberation (not kidding). Their signs read “It’s not food. It’s violence.” They seemed well organized, where wearing blue t-shirts, and several carried video cameras to document.

  • They may or may not have been connected to the vegan conference that was somewhere in the area; a bunch of them were eating at the Busboys & Poets in Shirlington on Saturday night. One of them kept stepping outside and lighting up his cigarette next to where those of us at the outside seating were trying to eat, which was especially charming.

  • The same group were protesting outside of Stead park on P st because the free meals that DC provides for low-income children during the summer contain meat. They were literally yelling at working class children receiving free meals who otherwise might not have had lunch. I used to be a vegan and am still a vegetarian, but these guys piss me off. Have you never heard of intersectionality?

    • Blithe

      Wow! That’s seriously cruel, and unhelpful. Yelling at kids is low by any standard. I hope they at least supported their protest with a large financial donation and a hookup to a catering service that could provide a meatless taco bar for the kids they were yelling at. No?

    • Ugh, that’s terrible.

  • I *think* this has to do with the growing protests over Whole Foods carrying rabbit in their meat selections.

    But it’s pretty bad when you can’t tell what a protest is about.

    • I might be wrong, but isn’t it true that rabbits are one of the most sustainable meat sources? I eat meat and try to be a responsible consumer, but protesting rabbit meat because we don’t like doing icky things to cute fluffy animals doesn’t seem like the best argument.

      • General Grant Circle

        We used to encourage people to grow and eat rabbits during WWII for that very reason.
        The meat itself is fine, the problem with rabbit is there are alot of bones to pick not alot of meat off of. Not bad if you are just doing one, but can’t make a huge industry from it like say chicken.

  • I assume the guy up front is wearing sustainable black leather boots?

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