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by Prince Of Petworth December 7, 2017 at 2:25 pm 0


North Capitol and H Street, NW

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

Gonzaga College High School (19 Eye Street NW) will ask DC liquor licensing authorities for a tavern license. However, teachers there should not start looking forward to a day when the faculty room has a mixologist to help take the edge off.

Stephen Neill, Gonzaga’s “Senior Vice-President for Advancement”, along with an attorney, appeared at the December 5 meeting of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6E/Shaw to reassure that the school was not going to become a tavern. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth December 6, 2017 at 2:15 pm 0

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

A proposal to make on-street parking more difficult for non-residents brought local businesspeople and residents out to the meeting of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2E/Georgetown Monday night (December 4).

ANC2E Chair Joe Gibbons characterized “the meat” of the proposal: for every local block that is part of the District’s Residential Permit Parking (RPP) program, one side of the street will be reserved for local residents and guests. The other side will be “for anybody”. As it stands now, any Ward Two resident with a permit can drive to Georgetown and enjoy the benefits of on-street parking under the RPP program.

The proposal brought local businesspeople out to oppose the plan, which they claimed would drive away customers. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 30, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0


Photo via office of zoning files

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

A four-unit apartment building at the N Street entrance to Blagden Alley has been operating for about 14 years on the basis of “forged” documents. That’s the story a committee of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2F/Logan Circle heard at its regular monthly meeting last night (November 29).

Nneka Shelton, the representative of the owners of 924 N Street NW, told ANC2F’s Community Development Committee that the owners have been operating the building since 2003 without a valid DC Certificate of Occupancy. At various times in the meeting, Shelton characterized the owner’s current Certificate of Occupancy as “faulty” or “forged”.

The certificate of occupancy in the publicly-available electronic files of the DC Office of Zoning for this case is from July 1985 and allows a dry cleaners to operate on the premises. Shelton said at the meeting that this is the latest Certificate of Occupancy for the building.

A Certificate of Occupancy is the DC government’s confirmation that a property is being used in accordance with zoning regulations. In this case, the property is now zoned RF-1, which is “for areas predominantly developed with attached row houses on small lots within which no more than 2 dwelling units are permitted”. Before a 2016 conversion of zoning designations, the building was categorized as “R-4”, but the limitations were the same – no more than two residential units per property.

Now the owners want to get legal. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 24, 2017 at 12:45 pm 0

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

“We have absolutely no interest in doing Airbnb,” one of the owners of 3629 Windom Place NW said.

Still, rather than take the owner’s word for it, Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 3F/Van Ness voted to stipulate in its endorsement of zoning relief that the owners of the home will not use their planned basement apartment as a short-term homeshare. The unanimous vote of the ANC took place at its regularly-scheduled November 21 meeting.

3629 Windom Place is a single-family home located on a triangular lot at the corner of Windom Place and Reno Road. The couple living there wishes to convert the basement into a separate apartment and rent it out. They might be able to do so as a “matter of right”, that is, without zoning relief or ANC approval, except that they wish to put the door to the proposed basement apartment in the front of the building, and not the side or the rear. A front-facing door requires zoning relief, according to DC regulations.

The owners told the ANC they chose a front entrance because the alternatives would require extra lighting. The extra lighting would shine into the windows of their only neighbor’s house, they explained, while front entrance lighting, if any, would not. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 22, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0


2601 Sherman Avenue, NW

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

The owners of the City Corner Market (2601 Sherman Avenue NW) want to sell wine and beer. They are on a long trip through the DC government bureaucracy to make it happen.

On November 20, a committee of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 1B/U Street unanimously endorsed an application for zoning relief which will bring the store one step closer to legal wine and beer sales. However, if the store gets the zoning relief that it seeks, it then must start from square one and apply for a liquor license from a separate DC agency. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 21, 2017 at 3:15 pm 0


12th and U St, NW

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

A committee of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 1B/U Street heard and unanimously approved a plan to add a second story to Dukem Ethiopian Restaurant (1114-1118 U Street NW) last night (November 20). ANC1B’s Zoning, Preservation and Development Committee had a surprisingly quiet presentation and debate.

“I am shocked that there is no one here from the community,” said committee chair Patrick Nelson.

Dukem Ethiopian Restaurant, like many DC restaurants, has a settlement agreement with the ANC and perhaps other parties. These settlement agreements can cover a wide variety of topics, but often they deal with matters like hours of operation and trash disposal. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 13, 2017 at 2:15 pm 0


Rendering of potential 601 K Street hotel design from DC Office of Zoning files

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

It is not clear who will build the planned “235 key” hotel with a rooftop bar at K and Sixth Streets NW. The design is only in its earliest stages. No hotel group has been chosen to run the hotel once it is built. Neither the bar or the hotel has a name. The penthouse bar may be run by the proprietors of the hotel, or may be operated by a third party.

But the penthouse bar that may appear someday above Mount Vernon Square already has closing hours – midnight weekdays, 2 a.m. weekends – endorsed unanimously by Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6E/Shaw at its last regularly-scheduled meeting on November 7.

“It’s a little unusual in setting particular usage terms before an operator is even selected,” said Commissioner Alex Marriott (district 05). The planned hotel will be in Marriott’s district. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 9, 2017 at 2:15 pm 0


Photos by David McAuley

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

Last night (November 8), the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) presented plans to make Massachusetts Avenue NW “a safer corridor for vehicles and pedestrians”. DDOT showed Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2B/Dupont that accidents occurred much more frequently in the project area – between Dupont Circle and Rock Creek Park – than normal. The frequency of rear end collisions and “side swipes” was especially high in the area, the presenters said.

As a remedy, DDOT proposes to start with the condition of the pavement. ANC2B saw evidence that well over half of the area scored “poor” on a Pavement Condition Index. This section of Massachusetts Avenue often has uneven pavement and worn pedestrian crossings, in spite of the fact that it also hosts some of Washington’s most exclusive clubs and 34 embassies.

The presenters also unveiled plans to reduce the width of the four traffic lanes in this area from 12.5 feet across to 11 feet. With the extra space, an unraised central pedestrian median, six feet wide, would be added. Commissioner Daniel Warwick (district 02) asked why there couldn’t been even narrower lanes and two-way protected bike lanes in the center. Commissioner Mike Silverstein (district 06) pointed out that this part of Massachusetts Avenue was the normal route of the Vice-President’s motorcade. The implication was that the Secret Service was likely to veto any plan that interfered with its ability to maneuver in traffic. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth November 8, 2017 at 2:25 pm 0

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

Mayor Muriel Bowser and a team of department heads discussed many topics at the regular monthly meeting of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 6E/Shaw last night (November 7), but the conversation frequently circled back to garbage and the vermin who feed off of it.

“The number one complaint is rats,” said ANC6E Chair Alexander Padro (Commissioner for district 01), as he prepared to pepper Bowser with sanitation-related complaints from Commissioners and constituents.

“I take it very seriously,” Bowser replied, adding that the city is working with restaurants and examining best practices from other cities. Bowser also said that “the growth of the rat population is real”, due to exceptionally warm weather the last two winters, and she was hoping for “a very cold winter” to assist in dealing with the problem.

Bowser also told the audience that the administration was planning a rat-centric (“not potholes, not lights, not trees – just rats“) community walk in the Dupont Circle area next week.

After discussing some other topics, Padro asked: “Are we ready to move on to trash?” (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth October 31, 2017 at 2:30 pm 0


1210 R Street, NW

The following was written by PoPville contributor David McAuley, founder of Short Articles about Long Meetings.

Developers legally committed to providing a unit of affordable housing at the Logan Station Condominiums (1210 R Street NW) are asking Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2F/Logan Circle whether they can abandon the commitment if they provide the community some other type of compensation.

On October 25, attorney Anthony Rachal and a representative from the developer told the Community Development Committee of ANC2F that they wished to be relieved of this responsibility, due to unforeseen construction problems.

“This is becoming obscenely expensive,” the developer’s representative said.

Since 2007, when it opened, the 63-unit Logan Station Condominiums has had a large “community room”, which was primarily for the use of the Metropolitan Baptist Church, the condo’s original landlord and previous occupant of the space. However, the church filed for bankruptcy protection in 2016. In the wake of the filing, the church petitioned DC authorities to convert the now-unneeded community room into three additional condominium units, of which one unit would be officially designated as affordable housing.

Inadequate documentation of the original project caused repeated delays in construction, the developer said. In one case, an attempt to drill into the slab foundation of building cut the electrical supply for all the elevators in the condominium complex. Because of these difficulties, the developers would not be able to construct the additional units as originally planned.

Instead, the developers and their attorney suggested that stakeholders, including the ANC, negotiate a package of community benefits in compensation for the lost unit of affordable housing. For example, the developers offered a larger unit of affordable housing at 721 Kennedy Street NW. A committee member asked how far away it was.

One mile?, the developer guessed. (more…)

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