Washington, DC

by Prince Of Petworth July 20, 2015 at 2:25 pm 10 Comments

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“Dear PoPville,

I’m new to the Bloomingdale neighborhood, and am trying to figure out how to run near the MacMillan Reservoir. I passed by it once in the car and it looked like you could run right along the water, but then when I went back to try it (from First St. NW) I got stuck in a maze of fences and parking lots. Do you know if it’s only accessible from the North (Hobart Pl/Michigan Ave)? Can you help?”

Hmm from Bloomingdale – I’d go to Bryant and head west to 4th Street then go north passing Howard University and it’ll turn to 5th Street and you’ll see the view in the photo above. I’m not sure if you can do a full lap around the water thought – isn’t part of the road closed by security? Anyone else have a good route to run around here?

by Prince Of Petworth April 9, 2014 at 4:00 pm 62 Comments

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Some more renderings from the folks at Vision McMillan plus they also have an update on the DC Zoning Commission:

“The DC Zoning Commission will hold hearings on the McMillan Planned Unit Development (PUD) on May 1st, 5th, 8th and 13th should additional time be required. Each night, planning experts and members of the VMP team responsible for each facet of the project will provide testimony in support of the redevelopment. Community input is critical! Visit the May PUD Zoning Hearings event for details and to let us know when you will attend.”

You can check out some previous renderings here. The future McMillan Development will be located at the McMillan Sand Filtration Site at North Capitol and Michigan Ave, NW.

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by Prince Of Petworth December 18, 2013 at 11:30 am 67 Comments

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In late October we looked at some cool rendering for the planned future McMillan Development at the McMillan Sand Filtration Site at North Capitol and Michigan Ave, NW. At that time we were told they were hoping to get “shovels in the ground by summer 2014 and deliver the first buildings in 2016.” You can read more about the plans here. In the meantime check out some more renderings I hadn’t seen from Envision McMillan:

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“View from a rooftop at Park Place, you can see the the multi-family building, the North Service Court entrance and the pocket park atop preserved Cell 14.”

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“Bays on the residential building pay homage to the three sand bins it faces. The building can accommodate a 50,000 SF full service grocery store complete with underground parking. — at North Service Court & North Capitol Street.”

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“New buildings on both sides of the Court are set back to give emphasis to the iconic cylindrical Sand Bins. The new healthcare facility brings 3,000 jobs to Ward 5. — at North Service Court & North Capitol Street.”

by Prince Of Petworth November 1, 2013 at 3:15 pm 12 Comments

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Follow up to our discussion earlier in teh week. From a press release:

“The Historic Preservation Review Board yesterday, after a hearing to review revisions to Vision McMillan Partner’s Plan for the McMillan Sand Filtration Site, voted unanimously to support advancement of the project. Board members were overwhelmingly positive in their responses to this most recent round of revisions, calling the plan a “very, very thoughtful and serious response to what we established,” (Maria Casarella) and referring to collaboration on the project as “very tangible and commendable.” (Rauzia Ally) The Vision McMillan Partners development team includes Trammell Crow Company, EYA and Jair Lynch Development Partners.

Anne Corbett, Project Director with Vision McMillan Partners said after the hearing: “This is a significant moment in our journey to create a unique place that honors this site’s rich history and creates opportunity and excitement for local residents. This is far from over, but our team will continue to work tirelessly with the community and the HPRB to deliver something that truly reflects the desires of surrounding communities. We are thrilled with the HPRB’s decision today and very thankful for all of the community members who came to show their support today.” (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth October 29, 2013 at 4:00 pm 125 Comments

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Renderings courtesy of Envision McMillan

Last week a reader asked about the plans for the McMillan Sand Filtration Site. Thanks to the folks at Envision McMillan for sending these awesome renderings of the planned McMillan Development. I’m told if all goes well “We are hoping to get shovels in the ground by summer 2014 and deliver the first buildings in 2016.”

They write on their website:

“Earlier this month, VMP submitted revised plans for McMillan that address the remaining concerns raised by the Historic Preservation Review Board at the June hearing. The Historic Preservation Officer has posted their report on the new designs and it’s pretty fabulous news.

Key highlights include the following direct quotes:

“(T)he latest version of the master plan represents a significant improvement over previous versions and now retains the significant above-grade topographical, architectural and engineering features that were identified by the Board as the most important.”

“The revised master plan would retain significant character-defining features of the landmark sufficient to convey its historic character.”

The report recommends, specifically, that the Board “find the concept designs to represent an architecturally coordinated and cohesive approach that specifically relates to the character of the McMillan site.”

Read the entire report here.

If you would like to come support the project at the hearing, please let me know– email me at mcmsalon(at)gmail.com. We’d love to see you at HPRB, but if you miss that, please be sure to join us at the Open House on November 16th.”

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More renderings after the jump. (more…)

by Prince Of Petworth October 25, 2013 at 2:15 pm 11 Comments

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Photo by PoPville flickr user hellomarkers!

McMillan Reservoir – mixed use retail?

“I just saw some minutes from a meeting today that included some discussion on the plans for the McMillan reservoir in Bloomingdale and it says “mixed use retail and residential buildings.”

I’m wondering what “mixed use retail” even means. Does that mean a grocery store? Or, maybe it’s just a typo…”

You can see all forum topics and add your own here.

by Prince Of Petworth June 6, 2013 at 3:15 pm 76 Comments

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Photo by PoPville flickr user Scenic Artisan

From a press release:

The District wants to surplus The McMillan Park Reservoir Historic District. Not only that, but it supports the plans of its development consultant, Vision McMillan Partners, to destroy 90% of the historic structures that make the site special. After a door-to-door community survey and close to 2,000 petition signatures that mean nothing to Councilmember McDuffie, community members say “Stop VMP! Stop the Surplus”

WHAT: The District Government holds a public hearing in the neighborhood to listen to the community’s views on it plans to declare McMillan Park Reservoir Historic District to be “surplus” public real estate. There may be possible appearances by Councilmember McDuffie, Mayor Gray, and Deputy Mayor Victor Hoskins.

The Friends of McMillan Park and concerned local citizens will voice their concerns. They are calling on Mayor Gray to stop the surplus, stop VMP’s development plans from going forward, and to consider alternatives that preserve and repurpose the above- and below-ground historic structures of this national landmark park.

WHEN: Thursday, June 6, 2013, 6:30pm
WHERE: All Nations Baptist Church, 2001 North Capitol St. NE (North Capitol & Rhode Island)

by Prince Of Petworth October 2, 2012 at 11:00 am 55 Comments


Photo by PoPville flickr user hellomarkers!

We last spoke about the development plans and saw lots of photos for the McMillan Sand Filtration Site here [Located on the north by Michigan Avenue, on the east by North Capitol Street, on the south by Channing Street and on the west by First Street].

From a press release:

The DC Chapter of the Sierra Club has come out against the current development plan proposed for the McMillan Park Reservoir site. In its letter to the Historic Preservation Review Board, the Club asks the HPRB to “reject the currently-proposed master plan” because it contains far too little contiguous public park space.

“The present design plans do too little to preserve the parklike characteristics that dominate the present space,” Jim Dougherty, the Club’s Conservation Chair, tells the HPRB. “A more balanced plan for the McMillan Park site would devote half or more of the surface to contiguous park and park-like use.”

The local Sierra Club thus joins Howard University, Advisory Neighborhood Commission 1B, and community groups representing Bloomingdale, Pleasant Plains, and Stronghold in opposition to the current plan.

Full Text of the Sierra Club Letter:

On behalf of the Sierra Club and its 2,500 members living in the District of Columbia, I write to express our concerns regarding the proposed master plan and design guidelines for development of the McMillan Park and Sand Filtration Site.

In our view, the present design plans do too little to preserve the parklike characteristics that dominate the present space. Though the site has, regrettably, been fenced off over the past decades, its vast green vistas have always given us hope that the inevitable commercial development plans would honor that tradition and provide nearby neighborhoods with the myriad blessings of accessible parkland. A more balanced plan for the McMillan Park site would devote half or more of the surface to contiguous park and park-like use. Further, this park space should be unfenced and thus available for the use and enjoyment of all of the City’s residents and visitors.

The Sierra Club therefore asks that the Board reject the currently-proposed master plan and insist on the submission of creative alternative plans that achieve a better balance of commercialization and parkland preservation.

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