GDoN “entertaining space on two levels” edition (reader request)

1303 SPRING RD NW

These units are located at 1303 Spring Road, NW. The MRIS listing says:

“NEW CONDO by Ziba Mgmt – 3 bedroom, 3 bath light filled condo walking distance to METRO, The Coupe, 11th St. restaurants, shopping and METRO! Gorgeous unit with living/entertaining space on two levels and a patio. High end finishes, coffered ceiling, custom trim work and more.”

gdon

You can see more photos here.

This 3 bed/3 bath is going for $899,000 ($264 monthly fee.)

Unit #2 is going for $999,000.

22 Comment

  • Calling it “light filled” is, perhaps, accurate assuming they don’t mean sunlight.

  • I live around here and while I personally wouldn’t pay this much for half a house, it’s hard to say the pricing is out of line with recent sales. There have been at least two rowhouse condo units sold for over $1 million within a couple blocks of this place, and a third that hit 960K. A SFH on this same block closed at almost $1.1 million five months ago. Now having said that, there have been two entire renovated houses within a block of this place that have sold for 950K/860K in the past six months.

    • …And I forgot about a smaller SFH nearby that sold for only $734K, but that place was on a tiny lot. If you’re set on this neighborhood and really want to spend a million dollars, there’s a house on sale on Shepherd that has a basement unit and is zoned for Powell.

    • Bout you would pay this much for an condo in a larger building? What is the difference? I never understand why commenters say “I personally wouldn’t pay this much for half a house”. You’d be hard press to find a regular condo in a larger building with this amount of sqft.

      • I wouldn’t pay this much for half a house because, as my post indicated, you can get a whole house (with a rental unit) 1.5 blocks away in a better school zone.

      • meh, there’s a unit for sale in The Iowa that’s almost the same size but cheaper… and in Logan… and it comes with a parking spot

  • hard to imagine any “trim work” that isn’t “custom”

  • I just can’t imagine spending that for half a house when I have no control over who owns the other half! I know at least 4 people with condos in 2-3 unit buildings who have major issues with the other owners. (Not paying the condo fee, renting out to rowdy groups, etc.)

    • binntp

      I’m with you, Victoria. I also always find it interesting that in these split home/condo conversions, the bedrooms for the lower unit are often directly under the kitchen/living area level for the upper unit. I guess that is to make it easier to carry groceries, etc. in via the entry level on the bottom floor, but if you keep hours different from your upstairs neighbors and need to sleep while they’re partying it up in the living room, you’re SOL.

      • Though this one isn’t, I have seen quite a few that have the lower unit’s bedrooms in the original cellar so just the living levels are abutting. I’m in a 2 unit building, in the upper unit (thankfully with amazing neighbors, and paid no where near this price) but our setup has the lower unit’s living level in the original cellar, bedroom level on next, with our bedroom level next and our living level on the top floor.

        Hadn’t really seen it before we purchased ours, and at first it seemed like it was going to be somewhat of a pain carrying groceries up 2 flights of stairs, but I love it now. We don’t have to worry about noise really if we’re hanging out in our living area, the view from our living level is nice, and its also easier to get up to the roofdeck.

    • In a two-unit home, would it be better to set it up as condo or as a co-op?

      I also can’t imagine buying half a house for similar price to a whole home. I guess this was pretty common about 40 years ago, but they were called duplexes back then. Anybody know what’s the difference in the ownership structure?

      • In a Condo you actually own the unit and in a co-op you own a share in the building that allows you to live in a specific unit.

      • My understanding was that “duplexes” were usually what the British call “semi-detached” homes — houses that are detached on one side and share a party wall in the middle. There are some neighborhoods in D.C. where these are common, but rowhouses are more common in the closer-in neighborhoods.
        .
        * Except maybe in NYC, where “duplex” can mean “apartment with more than one level.”

        • The best option of course is to buy the whole building and rent the other unit out. But not a lot of opportunity for that these days except in developing neighborhoods – and even then, you always risk loosing thousands with DC anti-landlord laws.

        • HaileUnlikely

          Exactly. From a functional standpoint and an ownership standpoint, a each unit in a duplex is basically like an end-unit rowhouse. However, for the most part, in DC, neighborhoods with duplexes and neighborhoods with rowhouses are different neighborhoods. Most (not all, but most) of the neighborhoods with duplexes were historically and many still are working-class neighborhoods with smaller and generally less upscale housing. (I own and live in a duplex in such a neighborhood)

  • ha! A milly for half a house…yeah, that’s overpriced even for DC.

  • I see only two bathrooms in the photos, both of which have large walk-in showers. I sure hope that third bathroom has a tub.

  • This is actually pretty tasteful… think it will get asking…

  • Don’t even have time to put the plant in the ground…sell flip, sell flip, ….!!

    • Ha, well spotted!
      .
      Let’s hope they managed to plant it after the photo was taken. If not, it’s likely to be swiped for Mother’s Day.

  • Will fetch this easily. Everything even close to Columbia Heights does these days.