recommendation for refinishing original door trim and banister?

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Topic: recommendation for refinishing original door trim and banister?

Home and Garden May 11, 2013 at 2:52 pm

recommendation for refinishing original door trim and banister?

I’m interested in refiishing the original floors, stairs, banister, and wood trim around all of the door openings in a 1920s house.  I’ve talked to a couple of floor finishers, but they ONLY do the floors and stair treads and risers (not the other woodwork).  Who do you call to refinish the banisters and door trim?  Any recommendations out there for companies that do all of this wood work, or someone for just the banister and door trim?  Thanks!

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 Hi.  I have a 1917 row house, i’ve been doing the same thing – removing layers of paint from all my trim and doors.  For the removable stuff, doors and moulding, I take my stuff to Bob Reed.  You can look him up on Angieslist or Yelp – It’s called “the stripping workshop.”   Most recently I took all my upstairs doors to Bob. He stripped the doors down to bare wood then repaired damaged panels.  I restained them with Minwax Polyshades 1 step.  They look like new.
Here’s his contact info:
Bob Reed’s Stripping Workshop
411 New York Avenue NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 544-1470
I’ve been struggling with the non-removable wood.  I’m very interested in any other advice you get to your post.
Regards
~r

Any interest in DIY? Some combination of sandpaper and gel stripper worked for me really nicely. You do need to be somewhat stubborn about winning against the old crud, but there’s nothing magical about it. I refinished with a minwax stain and a few layers of brushed on poly.

Perhaps try in a small area first.

To answer above question, Bob Reed charged me around $120/door. They were dipped and stripped down to the bare wood. He charges slightly less for doors with just stain versus painted doors. Totally worth it in my book. All I had to do was a light sand to get the wood grains to lay back down, then the one-step minwax poly.

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