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From the Montgomery County Police Department:

“Recently, Damascus area residents have reported multiple sightings of a black bear at locations in and around the Oak Ridge Park. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) reminds residents that sightings in suburban areas are not uncommon this time of year. In early summer, young bears begin to find their territory.

The Montgomery County Police are cautioning residents not to approach or feed bears that they encounter. Furthermore, no one should ever corner a bear, but allow a bear a route of escape or a way out.

For more information or to report a bear sighting, contact DNR Wildlife & Heritage Service at 410-260-8540. After-hour non-emergency sightings, please leave a message; after-hour emergency, 410-260-8888. Residents may still call 9-1-1 if there is an immediate threat due to the bear’s behavior.”

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Photo by PoPville flickr user John Cochran

Been a rough day today – thank you for this John Cochran, thank you.

“This squirrel managed to work the top of our bird feeder and get inside. He’d hit the jackpot. Then one of his squirrel buddies knocked the top and trapped him inside. He got out eventually, but it took a while.”

And absolutely, please consider this a bonus caption contest photo.

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Photo by PoPville flickr user Lauren Parnell Marino

From an email:

“I am pleased to announce that I’m coordinating DC’s first Master Naturalist Program scheduled to run this summer! If you have ever been interested in learning more about the natural world around you, and have the desire to “give back”, this program may be a good fit for you!

For those of you that aren’t familiar with the Master Naturalist Program, it has two components: an intensive volunteer training that gives a comprehensive overview of DC’s natural history, followed by a year-long period in which trainees complete 40 hours of volunteer service with pre-approved projects that advance conservation, environmental stewardship, and outreach in the District.

The classes will focus on DC’s physical environment, ecology, and then move on to DC’s flora and fauna. Class examples include: geology, forest ecology, taxonomy, birds, aquatic life, etc. Each class is taught by a local expert and is approximately 3 hours long, consisting of a presentation/lecture followed by a hands-on or field activity. (more…)

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Nice find from @NanksH:

“A penguin under Key Bridge?? What kind of bird is this?”

@JasonWardNY with the score: “Black-crowned Night Heron”.

From Audubon:

“Seen by day, these chunky herons seem dull and lethargic, with groups sitting hunched and motionless in trees near water. They become more active at dusk, flying out to foraging sites, calling “wok” as they pass high overhead in the darkness. Some studies suggest that they feed at night because they are dominated by other herons and egrets by day. A cosmopolitan species, nesting on every continent except Australia and Antarctica.”

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Thanks to a reader for sending in:

“The K Street Vultures that roost on the corner of 11th and K NW. They usually perch on the chimney and steeple of the church across the street but often land on our office’s windowsill in the mornings. They’ve become a bit like office mascots. Apparently they were interested in my breakfast today.”

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Thanks to a reader for sending the shot above from Dupont Circle this morning. Falcon?

And quite the description (actually pretty terrifying because it’s happened to me) on the Hill tweeted by @HStreetDC_:

“Aggressive crow dive-bombing people at 14th/SC SE. Animal Control can’t remove for a few days because of baby birds in nest. Be careful.”

It’s pretty funny though if you happen to see it happen to someone. My neighbor still laughs about the time I was chased up and down the street by a momma bird about 5 years ago.

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Mount Pleasant repping well this month.

Thanks to a reader for sending in:

“This male pileated woodpecker and his mate demolished my suet feeder a few times this spring. Yes, he’s about 12-15 inches long. Absolutely huge. In Mt Pleasant, near Rock Creek Park.”

If you have any sightings please email princeofpetworth@gmail.com or tweet to @PoPville