Kevin writes:

“What’s up with my water? Cut off for a few minutes, and this is coming out of the taps now. (Taylor St NW)”

DC Water tweets:

“Flushing tap water for 15 mins should clear it up. If it doesn’t disappear after 15 mins contact the Drinking Water Division at 202-612-3440”

pool water
Photo by PoPville flickr user Chabelamarie

From DC Water:

“From March 20 through April 17, 2017, the disinfectant in drinking water will temporarily switch from chloramine to chlorine. During this time, you may notice a slight change in the taste and smell of your drinking water.

DC Water purchases treated drinking water from the Washington Aqueduct. Every year for four to five weeks, the Aqueduct switches disinfectants from chloramine back to chlorine to flush out the water distribution system and improve water quality. During the temporary switch, DC Water will also conduct system-wide flushing to enhance water quality. This program is a common practice for many U.S. water systems that normally use chloramine throughout the year. The Washington Aqueduct will continue to add a corrosion control inhibitor during this temporary switch to prevent lead release.

DC Water routinely collects and tests water samples to monitor for chloramine and chlorine levels throughout the city and will continue to do so during this period. You can view the latest test results here. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates the safe use of chlorine and chloramine.

To reduce the taste or smell of chlorine, DC Water recommends: (more…)

dc-water
“DC Water contractor crews performing water pipe replacements earlier this year. Courtesy David Kidd.”

From a press release:

“This week, DC Water began work to replace old water mains in the Bloomingdale neighborhood in Northwest, DC. Some of the water mains in the neighborhood were installed in the late 1800s and are past their useful life. In fact, there have been about 25 water main breaks in the area since 2000, most of them occurring in just two blocks.

DC Water will replace close to a mile of 8-inch and 12-inch water mains. In addition to improving system reliability, the replacement program will also provide increased water pressure and unimpeded water flows. Within the same program, the Authority will also replace fire hydrants, valves and service lines located in public property. DC Water will replace any lead service lines in public space and will also offer to replace the private side (on homeowners’ private property) at the same time—at the homeowners’ expense, a cost-effective measure since the contractors will already be excavating in the neighborhood. (more…)

WaterIsLife

Thanks to a reader for sending:

“As you walk from Yards Park, along the Anacostia, toward the Stadium (Anacostia Riverwalk Trail). Note the “DC Water is life” logo on the truck juxtaposed with the tremendous amount of trash in the Anacostia River. Taken in front of DC Water.”

st e

From DC Water:

“After more than 10 years in the planning and approval process, DC Water is moving forward with the St. Elizabeths water storage tower. Construction is slated to begin in the coming weeks, and is scheduled for completion in 2018.

Some areas east of the Anacostia River have historically experienced low water pressure. DC Water planned years ago to improve the pressure with a new pumping station, water tower and transmission mains. Together, these elements would create a new water service zone (new pressure area) south of the Ft. Stanton area. While the pumping station was built in 2008, the water storage tower was delayed in approvals and permitting. (more…)

good water
Photo by PoPville flickr user District Shots

In happier water news:

“Recent results from DC Water’s required lead testing program mark the lowest lead levels measured in more than a decade. Levels have continued to decline since 2004, when the water treatment process began including a corrosion control additive to reduce lead release in water. Since 2003, DC Water has replaced more than 20,000 lead service pipes on public property, representing the removal of nearly 118 miles of lead pipes that connect public water mains to household plumbing. DC Water replaces lead service pipes during water main upgrades or when customers choose to replace their portion of the service pipe on private property. DC Water reminds customers that lead sources are different in each property and urges residents to eliminate lead pipes and plumbing materials in their homes. (more…)