A reader sends this one from the 1300 block of F St, NE:

“This one ruined the roofline. Hopefully they’ll add a covered porch.”

I actually think this is a pretty nice one. But agree about hoping they add a covered porch. You like the way it’s turning out?



A reader sends nominates “this tragedy on Ontario between Kalorama and Euclid” for a Horse’s Ass Award. He adds:

“So sad. These homes are about 115 years old. Oh and they’re blocking a fire hydrant. Have been for days. I called the cops and they basically laughed and said I quote “if a house is on fire, then it’s the fire department problem not us” which was awesome and not surprising at all.”





A Bloomingdale reader sends in Sunday morning:

“Thought it might be of interest: multiple fire and rescue vehicles responded this AM due to floor collapse at 67 V NW. Thank goodness no one was in there or hurt.

It is a rowhouse that is under permit for pop up and pop back: issued a day or two before the new DCRA/zoning regs. According to responding fire dept personnel, no immediate danger / damage to adjoining rowhouses though they taped off surrounding area and front of house.

I suspect but do not know whether the heavy rain was just too much for whatever precautions the developer may have made. The permit to pop up and back this rowhouse is under appeal: I wonder how this incident will affect that?”

Another reader reports:

“With only a permit for interior demo, they spent a rainy Saturday removing the back exterior wall.”



pop up

Thanks to all who sent links to the Washington Post update:

“The District’s Zoning Commission gave final approval Monday night to new regulations governing the “pop-up” homes sprouting up in some of the city’s gentrifying neighborhoods, reducing the maximum height of single-family rowhouses to 35 feet from 40 feet.

The new regulations affect only neighborhoods in the city’s “R-4” zone — which includes some of the city’s most vibrant residential areas, such as Capitol Hill, Adams Morgan and Columbia Heights. The regulations go into effect immediately.”

Rendering via PETA

From an email:

“A five-story pop-up house on V Street is so hated by its neighbors that it’s commonly called “the middle finger” and has even been tagged as “the monstrosity” on Google Maps—but PETA believes it can vastly improve the building’s image. In a letter sent this morning, PETA offers to wrap the side of the building with a colorful mural that encourages, “Peas on Earth.”

“PETA’s mural would make ‘The Monstrosity’ an eyesore no more while encouraging the world to make healthy, humane, environmentally sound choices,” says PETA President Ingrid E. Newkirk. “A colorful mural about green eating would make the V Street pop-up eye-catching in a positive way.”