“Dear PoPville,

Lots of police activity in the bottom right corner of Meridian Hill Park [10:45am]. 8 cop cars and crime scene tape. Any idea what’s going on??”

‏@RudeHaggis tweets:

“Body at Meridian Hill Park this morning. At least, I think that’s what the police were hiding behind a sheet. @PoPville #dc”

Updates when/if more info is known.

@grahamacdonald tweets us:

“@PoPville confirmed body found”

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skating
Photo by PoPville flickr user pablo.raw

From NGA:

“The 2014–2015 ice-skating season at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden Ice Rink on the National Mall will begin November 14, 2014 and continue through March 15, 2015, weather permitting.

This season, Guest Services offers an exciting new program and broad range of skating lessons for all ages, taught by Emme Porter, Bruce Porter, and Sergey Korovin, who together have some 60 years of teaching experience, in addition to their experiences spanning figure skating, ice dancing, choreography, hockey, and more, on local, national, and international levels.

Admission
(two-hour sessions, beginning on the hour)
$8.00 adults
$7.00 seniors (age 50 and over)
$7.00 students (with school ID)
$7.00 children (age 12 and under)
$195.00 season pass

Skate and Locker Rentals
Skate rental: $3.00 (ID required)
Locker rental: $0.50 ($5.00 deposit required)
Visa, MasterCard and American Express accepted.
Season tickets are available for $195.

Ice Rink Hours
Monday–Thursday, 10:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m.
Friday-Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–11:00 p.m.
Sunday, 11:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m.

The ice-skating rink will close at 5:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Eve. The Gallery and Sculpture Garden are closed on December 25 and January 1

The National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden Ice Rink is located on the National Mall at 7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. During the evening, when the Gallery and Sculpture Garden are closed to the public, access to the ice rink and Pavilion Café is restricted to the entrances at Constitution Avenue and Madison Drive near 9th Street.”

omaolin1000wide
All OMA + OLIN renderings via 11th Street Bridge Park

From a press release:

“At 10 a.m. on Thursday, October 16, OMA Partner Jason Long and OLIN Partner Hallie Boyce will present their community inspired design concept and vision for the 11th Street Bridge Park. District Department of Transportation Director Matthew Brown and 11th Street Bridge Park Director Scott Kratz will provide opening remarks.

After a seven-month nationwide competition, the OMA + OLIN design was unanimously selected by the competition jury. The design team was asked to transform an aged-out freeway bridge into a one of a kind new civic space over the Anacostia River.

Continues with lots more info and renderings after the jump. (more…)

11th_st_park

From a press release:

“As part of a six month nationwide design competition, the 11th Street Bridge Park is excited to receive design concepts from four nationally recognized design teams. Landscape architects, architects and structural engineers have spent the summer envisioning Washington D.C.’s first elevated public park on the foundations of an old freeway bridge spanning the Anacostia River. The design proposals will be on exhibition and the public is invited to share feedback.

Informed by hundreds of community meetings with 11th Street Bridge Park staff, four design teams were tasked with creating an iconic new civic space supporting the community’s environmental, economic, cultural and physical health. These four teams were selected by the Bridge Park’s Jury of national experts for their creativity, energy and vision from more than 80 firms who responded to an open call for submissions launched in March, 2014.

The teams are:

Anacostia Crossing -Navy Yard View - OMA + OLIN
OLIN : OMA

Bridge park BA CRP rendering 02
Balmori Associates : Cooper, Robertson & Partners

On Cafe Base
Stoss Landscape Urbanism : Höweler + Yoon Architecture

WRT+NEXT Anacostia Promenade
Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) : NEXT Architects : Magnusson Klemencic Associates

Over the next month, the public is invited to review the design renderings and share feedback. Participants can take a short survey that will be shared with the Competition Jury as they select the final winning design. The four design concepts will be exhibited at the following venues across the city and available online with the goal of reaching the widest possible audience: (more…)

soldiers_home_access_petworth
Upshur and Rock Creek Church Rd, NW

“Dear PoPville,

I am sure Soldiers Home Park is a common topic, but haven’t see much on it since moving to the area last year. Has there been any discussion about reopening parts of the park to the public, especially given the new developments happening south of the Children’s Hospital, including the rumor that the reservoir by Howard is going to be opened up and developed into a new public space?

Does anyone know the history and politics around this issue?”

We had a rather contentious discussion about public access to the Soldiers Home grounds back in 2009. Since then a group called Friends of the Old Soldiers Home has been created so you should definitely check them out. There also has been and are planned many events on the property including those in coordination with the great Lincoln’s Cottage. And don’t forget the golf course (though I think prices have gone up a bit)…

pocket_park_rules
Pocket park in Petworth

From DDOT:

“The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) announced today that the public comment period for the proposed rulemaking governing private improvements on “pocket” parks is extended an additional 30 days. The comment period is being extended to allow comments from individuals and organizations—especially Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANCs)—that might not have been able to provide comments by the previous deadline. The extended comment period will last until Friday, September 19, 2014.

The rulemaking—which was originally published by DDOT in the DC Register on July 4, 2014—is intended to ensure that all improvements to DDOT-controlled triangle or “pocket” parks maintain public and open access. Additionally, the proposed rules will establish the agency’s policies and procedures for obtaining permits to adopt or make other private improvements to these small, federally-owned reservations.

The proposed regulations may be viewed here.

Written comments may be sent to: Samuel D. Zimbabwe; DDOT; 55 M Street SE; 5th Floor; Washington, DC 20003. Comments can also be sent to publicspace.policy@dc.gov.”

chuck_brown_park
rendering of Chuck Brown/Langdon Park located at 2901 20th Street, NE

From Marshall Moya Design:

“Go-Go, a subgenre of regional contemporary music that originated in Washington, D.C. during the mid 1960’s, is celebrated in this memorial for Chuck Brown, the legendary “Godfather of Go-Go.” When Chuck Brown passed away, the D.C. community yearned for a civic space where we could honor his musical legacy. This design, second in a series Marshall Moya Design has proposed for the D.C. government, incorporates photo mosaics of Chuck Brown from performances throughout the history of his career in a memorial park setting. MMD’s landscape design establishes an environment that captures the essence of this iconic musician with quintessential Washington, D.C. plantings of the region by using cherry blossoms and magnolia trees throughout the site.”

chuck_brown_park_dc

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“Dear PoPville,

I’ve been concerned about the National Park Service’s apparent disregard for D.C. residents — reflected in stories about Fort Reno and Carter Barron concert issues, inadequate trash management, etc. So, nearly three weeks ago, when Shevchenko Park — an NPS site at 22nd and P in Dupont — was suddenly enclosed in barbed-wire fencing, I was eager to know what was going on. Demolition of the plaza began the next day, and my inquiry about the nature of the work and its completion date, submitted through nps.gov, went unanswered for more than a week. After getting a vague email from the communications office with few details and no completion date, but encouraging me to contact them with any follow-up questions, I responded with a second request for the completion date, but heard nothing back. I then contacted an NPS superintendent for D.C. and heard nothing.

So I emailed the acting regional director, who told me someone would get back to me, at which point – more than two weeks after raising the simple question – a deputy superintendent told me that the work (basically redoing the entire area except for the statue of Shevchenko himself) wasn’t scheduled for completion until the end of October. That makes it a disruptive four-month project in a residential neighborhood, with no public notice other than signs that just went up yesterday but seem inadequate, since they provide no completion date or contact info.

I am looking forward to improvements at Shevchenko Park, which many Dupont residents see and use every day, but why should it be so difficult to find out what the National Park Service is doing in your neighborhood?”

park