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From a press release:

Who: Nameless Theater
What: Death at the Prom, by A’Leighsha C. Butler, directed by Nia M. Barge
When: April 16, April 23, April 30 Happy Hour Starts at 6pm. Show Starts at 7pm.
Where: Uniontown Bar & Grill 2200 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE
Tickets: $15 Early Bird Tickets until Sat May 30th. Regular Tickets $20. Student and group discounts available. Order online: www.thenameless.us

Nameless, a newly formed DC-based theater company, announces the premiere of Death at the Prom, a modern murder mystery comedy show. The site-specific production, takes place in the midst of a high school prom where disaster strikes. Attendees will gather clues, question suspects and bring the murderer to justice. Rather than observing the show from behind the safety of the fourth wall, Death at the Prom, catapults audiences from their seats and into the zany world of the show.

Uniontown Bar & Grill, one of only two sit down restaurants in the transitioning Anacostia neighborhood, will morph into the prom of Green Meadow High- a fictional school plagued with the typical student cliques, overworked teachers and an overzealous principal on a mission to reclaim the school. Nameless is thrilled to bring this theatrical event to the Anacostia neighborhood, which is also home to the Anacostia Arts Center. (more…)

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I have to admit, I’m loving this feature, if you have a photo of a neat find from your house or place of work please send an email to princeofpetworth(at)gmail.com thanks.

A reader writes:

“I bought a house in Anacostia few years ago and one of the features that I found interesting was a toilet located on the rear exterior of the house. Is this common for dc?”

Ed. Note: Back in 2008 a reader also found one in Petworth.

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Photo by The Anacostia Watershed Society courtesy of 11th Street Bridge Park

From a press release:

“The first-ever Anacostia River Festival will celebrate the history, ecology and communities along the banks of the Anacostia River. The 11th Street Bridge Park and the National Park Service present the event, which will offer free kayaking and canoeing, musical performances, fishing and water filtration workshops, live birds of prey demonstration, a photography exhibition and a bike parade. The Anacostia River Festival is a premier event and official closing of the 2015 National Cherry Blossom Festival.

WHEN: Sunday, April 12, 2015, noon – 4 p.m.
WHERE: National Park Service’s Anacostia Park. Good Hope Road and Anacostia Drive SE
COST: Free – Family Friendly Event
FOR MORE INFORMATION: here

“We are so excited to be a part of this year’s National Cherry Blossom Festival and look forward to the positive exposure it will bring to East of the River neighborhoods as well as the 11th Street Bridge Park,” said Scott Kratz, director of the 11th Street Bridge Park, a collaborative project of the D.C. City Government and non-profit Building Bridges Across the River at THEARC transforming an old freeway into a new civic space scheduled to open in 2018. “The Anacostia River is a stunning, but often forgotten, natural resource hiding in plain sight and, by collaborating with a number of existing groups, we aim to re-engage residents with this amazing urban watershed.”

The event will bring people from across the city and throughout the region to participate in hands-on art workshops, dragon boat rides, a community sing along, urban archaeology, community bicycle rides, boating and other fun activities to connect families with the natural world. (more…)

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Photo by PoPville flickr user ep_jhu

Anacostia- Would you move there? Which parts?:

“I don’t know much about Anacostia other than its reputation [to some] – dangerous, isolated, etc. But, looking at homes, it seems like there are some beautiful homes for reasonable prices on that side of the river. Are there parts of Anacostia that are better than others where it might be smart to target a housing search?”

You can see all forum topics and add your own here. If you are having trouble uploading your question to the forum please try clearing your cache. If it still doesn’t work please email me at princeofpetworth(at)gmail

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Photo by PoPville flickr user washingtonydc

More big news from Busboys and Poets:

“The Far Southeast Family Strengthening Collaborative (FSFSC) and Busboys and Poets will formerly announce a partnership that will result in a restaurant and hospitality and culinary leadership training institute in Ward 8 on Martin Luther King Ave., SE.

At the press conference, FSFSC will announce that a full service Busboys and Poets restaurant will occupy approximately 7,000 square feet in the building owned and operated by the Ward 8 based nonprofit. It will also highlight its plans to operate a full-scale hospitality and culinary arts leadership training institute and new office space for FSFSC.

The Far Southeast Family Strengthening Collaborative planned this venture with Ward 8 residents in mind. “Employment opportunities in these fields are flourishing – in the nation’s capital, and FSFSC wants to ensure Ward 8 residents are prepared and well equipped to compete for jobs in the field of culinary arts and hospitality,” states Perry Moon, Executive Director of FSFSC. “In addition, Busboys and Poets is bringing a needed amenity to the neighborhood.”

For eighteen years, FSFSC has partnered with residents, agencies, and institutions in the Southeast community to ensure a healthy and positive environment for families. The Hospitality and Culinary Leadership Institute will be one more step in providing resources and tools for residents of Ward 8.”

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Anacostia High School

Anacostia Voices is written by Paul Penniman. In 2003, Paul founded Resources for Inner city CHildren, RICH, which provides tutoring and mentoring services to Anacostia High School and the Cesar Chavez Public Charter School-Capitol Hill.

Paul previously shared Travis’ Essay “The history of me” a year ago.

Travis and I had just gotten into the car for the drive back from Greensboro after his day and a half orientation at North Carolina A&T when he uttered those words regarding his going to college. He doesn’t know anyone in his neighborhood, known as “Lench Mob,” who are going to or who have graduated from college. He is a first generation college attendee, as are D and W, MATHletes all, whom RICH has been working with since freshman year of high school. Travis is excited but nervous, D is jumping out of his skin to start at Morehouse College, and W is incredibly nervous as he approaches the day I leave him at South Carolina State.

It has been an amazing journey for these three scholars. They have endured abuse, neglect, and loss throughout their childhoods. Their teachers at Anacostia High School and members of the RICH staff are some of the steadiest adults in their lives. It will be an awesome experience to help deliver them all of them to their respective campuses.

Historically, 3% of Anacostia students have finished college. Since the terrific Achievers Program has started, that number has jumped to about 15%. RICH is committing resources to help Travis, W, and D finish college, as well as many others. As RICH’s community ages, we need to make sure we don’t say good-bye to them at high school graduation.

One of our first scholars, a boy who attended Maya Angelou and then Virginia Tech, has invited me to his wedding in the fall down South. Seeing him achieve another milestone in his life will give me the opportunity to visit the three MATHletes who are beginning the achievement of their next milestone. As our staff repeatedly tells me, many of whom have taught in many schools and school settings, “This is the most rewarding work we have ever done.”

From an email:

“Outrageous/Detrimental District Emergency Legislation

What: Developer Seeking Exemptions in Ward 8 Historic District — can set precedent for other historic communities & has far reaching implications

Legislative Hearing Date: April 8, 2014

Emergency Big K Legislation to City Council

This District emergency resolution attached above is not acceptable. It is targeted at present, to the residential development proposed at the commercial corridor on Martin Luther King Jr Ave, SE. Which is also in the Historic District.

It’s content is based on unfounded fear mongering, and is beneath the City and pandering. Near term development along the Historic District of Martin Luther King Jr Ave, SE is inevitable and occurring. Language in the Resolution is attempting to create poor, substandard outcomes with old, stale facts.

Where developers want to establish affordable housing developments in historic districts, to preserve the City’s heritage, they must be compelled to accomplish the developments within the reasonable historic guidelines. Passage of the legislative, as is, has the potential to alter the landscape of the historic district. The present language is sweeping and broad. (more…)

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From the Mayor’s Office:

“Mayor Gray and other officials today announced a plan to invest approximately $300 million in a brand-new hospital on the St. Elizabeths East Campus designed to replace the aging District-owned United Medical Center (UMC) on Southern Avenue SE.

Mayor Gray said the plan was the most sensible one to follow to ensure both the availability of high-quality medical care on the East End of the District and the fiscal health of the District – with the added bonus of helping to catalyze further economic development on the historic St. Elizabeths East Campus.

“We know how imperative it is for us to have a full-service hospital on the East End of our city – and, in 2010, the District took control of what is now known as United Medical Center,” Mayor Gray said. “However, it has been difficult for the District to own and operate United Medical Center in a way that is fiscally responsible. Frankly, unless we take decisive action, the hospital will continue to be a ‘money pit’ for District taxpayers.”

He noted that, in the last decade, District taxpayers have spent at least $160 million in subsidies for the current UMC – with no end in sight.

“Unless we have the courage and vision to act decisively now to solve the problem once and for all, the hospital will fail – and the District will have spent all these hundreds of millions of dollars without anything to show for our efforts,” Mayor Gray said. “I have come to the conclusion that building an entirely new hospital on the St. Elizabeths campus makes the most sense for the District in the long run.”

Mayor Gray listed several reasons for investing in a new hospital rather than capital improvements at the current UMC facility:

· Even after making a minimum of a $100 million capital investment in the nearly 50-year-old facility, the District would still be forced to cover $6-8 million annually in facilities maintenance – twice what a new facility would cost in maintenance costs;

· Investing in the current site does not offer the District a meaningful rebranding opportunity for the hospital;

· The current site is not Metro-accessible;

· And none of this investment would meaningfully increase the chances of the District attracting a high-quality operating partner for the hospital.

Mayor Gray contended that, while more costly in the short run, building an entirely new United Medical Center at St. Elizabeths would provide the most long-term advantages as well as a long-term solution to the problem of maintaining high-quality medical services east of the Anacostia River:

· It would allow the District to begin implementing its plans for long-term reform much more quickly than investing in the current United Medical Center campus;

· It would provide a brand-new, state-of-the-art facility – affording the District a major rebranding opportunity and the potential for significantly increased market share that goes along with it;

· It would cut the ongoing costs for facility maintenance and improvement in half;

· The site would offer much better access to public transportation from across Wards 7 and 8 as well as other parts of the area;

· It would greatly strengthen the likelihood of attracting a high-quality operating partner for the hospital;

· And it would further catalyze economic development on the St. Elizabeths campus, serving as yet another focus to attract subsidiary offices, dining, and retail options to service the thousands of employees and visitors for the new hospital.

The Mayor included a feasibility study for the project in his Fiscal Year 2014 Budget. His Fiscal Year 2015 Budget will include $20 million for the design of the new hospital, while the $300 million for its construction would be divided among the three following fiscal years ($93 million each in Fiscal Years 2016 and 2017, and the remaining $114 million in Fiscal Year 2018).

The District government would seek to identify an operating partner prior to breaking ground on the hospital, leveraging it as part of the partnership negotiations and allowing the partner input into construction decisions.”

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From an email:

“DC Lo-Fi
Anacostia Arts Center
1231 Good Hope Road SE
Washington DC 20020

OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, February 15, 2014
4-7PM

A new show from DC-based photographer Michael K. Wilkinson, “DC Lo-Fi,” seeks to capitalize on two points of familiarity to many city residents: urban vignettes focused on the disappearing signs of an ever-aging yet ever-changing city, and the ubiquitous square format of Instagram with its instantly recognizable filters.

The photographer, a Washington DC resident for over 20 years, has selected a range of scenes for the show, some of which would be recognized by astute observers of the city, and others which just resonate with a certain locationless urban sensibility.

“Part of the poignancy of the project, for me,” Wilkinson says, “is the fact that, as a professional photographer, I’m no longer using film, or even my digital SLR for that matter, to express myself artistically. Instead, I yank the iPhone out of my pocket and snap things I see as I’m walking around the city, then throw a couple images into Instagram, which cross-posts to flickr, Tumblr and Facebook. Within seconds, the feedback starts to roll in, one ‘ding’ at a time.

“In the age of the mobile device, you accomplish In a matter of minutes what it used to take weeks or even months to do when we shot on film, printed in darkrooms and hustled for gallery shows.”

Printed on ultra-high gloss metal surfaces ranging in size from 8×8 to 30×30 inches, the images in the show bridge the gap gorgeously between the ephemeral “social-digital” format and the permanence of a piece of art on the walls. Both the subject matter and the medium will strike viewers with a particularly strong currency and resonance, hitting nerves on both a new/hi-gloss-modern-mobile-culture level and a gritty, fast-disappearing urban-pioneer level.

Michael K. Wilkinson (mkw1.com) is an architectural photographer based in Washington DC. He has participated in over 30 one-man and group shows over the past 20 years. He has been an avid iPhone photographer since the day his carrier, Verizon, began offering the device on its network, but is and will always be amazed that he can take photographs with a telephone.”