Photo by PoPville flickr user Eric P.

DataLensDC was started in the summer of 2015 by Kate Rabinowitz, lover of all things data and District. She lives in a cozy Capitol Hill carriage house where she enjoys data mining, board games and wandering the city. Kate created to DataLensDC to present data-driven views of the character, trends and hacks of the ever-changing District.

My husband’s first words to me were basically “Where can I find a good local farmer’s market?” to which I responded MARRY ME. That’s how much I like farmer’s markets. I’ve been fortunate that wherever I’ve lived in the District a good farmer’s market has never been more than a short Saturday morning jaunt in warmer months. I was curious if I simply gravitated to places near markets or this was more of a universal DC experience, and how DC compared to other American cities. (more…)

click to enlarge

Thanks Mom and Dad! Here are a list of neighborhoods captured from this section of a Rand McNally 1898 map:

1. Petworth
2. Columbia Heights
3. Mount Pleasant
4. Ingelside
5. Meridian Hill
6. Washington Heights
7. Belair Heights
8. Woodley Park
9. Burleith
10. Georgetown
11. LeDroit Park
12. Dobbins Add.
13. Bloomingdale
14. Metropolis View
15. Brookland
16. Edgewood
17. Montello
18. Eckington
19. Ivy City
20. Trinidad
21. Rosedale
22. Isherwood
23. Uniontown
*24. Rosslynn

Ed. Note: Metropolis View is just east of the soldiers home and west of Brookland and must be brought back into usage immediately. I also think it’s time to bring back the Ivy City Race Track – are you listening Douglas Development – bring back the Ivy City Race Track please!!

Photo courtesy Mappy Hour DC

From an email:

“We had so much fun at Meridian Pint last time that we’re back again!

This month we’ll hear from urban fly fishing consultant Rob Snowhite. He’ll cover how to start, where to go and other tricks of the trade for fishing in the D.C. area. Join this new outdoor enthusiast community with maps, adventure planning and beer. Don’t forget to bring a map to share!


March 30th, 2015 at 7:00PM


Meridian Pint,  3400 11th St NW


Registration is free.”

Map via Capitol Hill Restoration Society

Thanks to Justin for sending:

“Wednesday, November 5

Expansion of the Capitol Hill Historic District: The Capitol Hill Restoration Society will sponsor a series of public meetings to present a case for expanding the Capitol Hill Historic District. The first of these – concerning ANC6A area – will be held from 6:45 – 8:30 pm, Maury Elementary School multipurpose room, 13th and Constitution Avenue, NE. For more information, see here.”

Map via Urbane click image to enlarge

A reader sends the above map from Urbane:

“Washington, DC. Your complex fabric of diagonal streets, circles and lobbyists make for a city that’s difficult to easily approach. In the wake of the shutdown, many think that DC is just about politics. We think it was about time to internalize the heated discussion and reveal that DC isn’t just about those folks on C-SPAN Capitol Hill.

It’s your fixie bike and pandas, too.”


click map to enlarge. Source: Library of Congress

Map of the Week is written by David A., a systems librarian and map geek living in NoMa. David previously wrote about a Birdseye view of the National Capital from 1892.

This 1791 topographical map gives a very raw look at the DC landscape before the city had streets. You can see that topography very much defined the original city limits. Boundary Street, today’s Florida Avenue, followed the bottom of the hill that still marks the border between the U St area and Columbia Heights and Adams Morgan.

If you look closely, unmarked buildings appear throughout the city. Another interesting feature is the broad creek running just south of the White House. With the exception of Rock Creek, all of the creeks in the original city limits would be filled in or covered over. Georgetown’s street grid looks very similar to today’s grid. An act of the Maryland Legislature set in motion the building of Georgetown. Surveying was completed in 1752, and by the time of the publishing of this map it had grown into a thriving port of trade.