GDoN “plenty of beds and baths” edition

2912-13th-street-northwest

This house is located at 2912 13th Street, Northwest. The listing says:

“4 level Colonial with 7 beds 3.5 baths. Central radiant heat and two zones AC. Original details throughout, grand dining, living and updated kitchen. Spacious outdoor entertaining and parking Beautiful hardwoods and plenty of beds and baths. In-law suite in the lower level with separate electric, 2 beds, 1 bath with WD.~ This home has a walk score of 87!”

gdon

You can see more photos here.

This 7 bed/3 bath is going for $1,199,900.

6 Comment

  • Can someone explain why realtors in Washington DC, a city known for its historic Victorian rowhouses, insist on on calling things that are not Colonials Colonials? /end rant.

  • They obviously don’t mention it (even though you can see it on the right side of the main photo), but this is right next door to some pretty troubled public housing. That’s a lot to pay to be on the doorstep of so much crime, but people pay it.

    Yeah, the “Colonial” thing is mystifying. Even I knew that was a Victorian rowhome, and I don’t know much about real estate.

  • 1) Not a colonial.
    2) A property going for over a $1 million, and you are selling is with a stackable washer and dryer? Maybe make the effort to upgrade that.

  • Hmm. I consider “plenty” of baths, for homes with basement apartments, to be no less than 3.5 baths. 1 for the basement apartment, 1 for the master suite, 1 for the other bedrooms, and you gotta have a powder room!

  • What’s with that lineup of garbage cans next door? Nice view as I’m heading up the front walk to my $1.2 million front door.

  • The issues noted above seem like they’d be much less of a problem if the buyer is looking to buy a group house as an investment. Rent the bedrooms out for an average of $900/month each and you can easily fund a $1 million mortgage after RE taxes. That doesn’t account for maintenance, but there are worse places to park $200-$250k in equity, pay down the mortgage with somebody else’s rent money, take the depreciation on your taxes, and capture the upside in income and value growth.