21 Comment

  • Great to have them in the neighborhood, but how much space do they need??

  • Looks lovely. So happy there are still some bookstores out there that are expanding.

  • Yay Kramerbooks. Must get by soon.

  • Love it. Kramerbooks is a blessing.

  • Love Kramers! But one has to ask; whats up with all the other struggling bookstores on their way out bookstores…wasn’t it just yesterday this same area had a few well known bookstores almost, dare I say it, next door..hmm

    • The Internet killed them all, along with record stores. Now we stare at computers and shopt there. (Progress?) What exactly is Kramerbooks expanding “into’?

    • I think Kramers succeeds with its restaurant and bar, which combined with their bookstore make it a destination. It looks like they’re doubling down on that with a new coffee bar and children’s reading space. It’s a very attractive community space with diverse offerings. I’ve been smitten with it since I first came across it years ago and am glad to see it continue to succeed.

    • maxwell smart

      If you are talking about Books-A-Million, huge difference between the two. BAM was basically an airport bookstore – the selection wasn’t anything you couldn’t buy at Target and now, I assume would be the kind of books people would be more inclined to read on an e-reader. Kramer, P&P offer a wider and deeper selection – things outside of fiction that people are less likely to e-read and also non-top 40 fiction.

    • Linc Park SE

      Try East City Books near EM Metro stop – – great selection and friendly staff- Im a fan.

    • Blithe

      I guess it depends on what you mean by “just yesterday” and “next door”. Olsson’s books was a few blocks away, and probably catered to a similar clientele. Olsson’s had music and some remainders, but Kramerbooks had the cafe and a much better location in terms of foot traffic. Second Story Books is nearby, but a very different type of shopping experience. I agree with Maxwell Smart re: Books-a-Million.
      – For me, Kramberbooks gets the edge because the location is very convenient. the location and the layout encourage impulse shopping, members of the staff are knowledgeable, they almost always have what I’m looking for, they have the cafe — which has had live music, AND they stay open late — very late on weekends.

      • The Olsson’s books in Georgetown, along Wisconsin Avenue, was paradise. They also had a big music section; twas one of the earliest Internet virus victims. It’s so much more fun to click through screen after screen on Amazon … :^(

    • “One has to ask” – how many books did you buy last year? How many from an independent bookstore and how many online?

      • I probably bought 20 books for myself last year, and every last one of them was on my Kindle. The convenience factor is off the charts. I understand that others don’t feel the same way, but I really don’t get it.

      • I bought three or four books from Kramer’s this year. They will hold books for you too; you slip down and pick it up later and pay. No risk of package theft! No need for a porch surveillance system! :^)

  • I loved the Olsson’s at Metro Center. It was steps away from the exit on 11th St. Great sales people, record collection and they knew what I liked. Although I work for the largest inbox in the world, I buy 50-100 books per year but ONLY from independent bookstores. Love the touch, smell and feel of paper; no Kindle for me. I prefer Politics and Prose. Once worked briefly at Crown Books in the 80’s. Trover is gone. Will order from Powell’s as well.

    • Olsson’s staff were good at book recs. That’s how ‘The Charterhouse of Parma’ fell to me; the staffwoman thought I’d enjoy it, and I did, on a Carolina beach, where it got soggy but is still on my shelf.