Monday starts “new parking meter rate” in Penn Quarter and Chinatown

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From DDOT:

“New Parking Meter Rate Schedule in Penn Quarter/Chinatown

Beginning October 17, there will be a new parking meter rate schedule in the Penn Quarter and Chinatown neighborhoods. The parking meter rate adjustment is part of a pilot project to improve parking availability through demand-based pricing. The pilot includes all metered on-street parking spaces within the area bounded by H Street NW, 3rd Street NW, E Street NW and 11th Street NW.

For spaces in the pilot area, parking meter rates on individual block faces will either decrease to $2.00 per hour, stay the same at $2.30 per hour, or increase to $2.75 per hour. Prices are also different depending on the time of day. On weekdays, there are three time periods: 7 am – 11 am, 11 am – 4 pm, and 4 pm – 10 pm. On Saturdays, the rates will be the same all day. The maps below show what the prices will be on each block in the study area during each time period.

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Parking in Penn Quarter/Chinatown

Approximately 1,000 on-street parking spaces in the Penn Quarter and Chinatown area are now clearly numbered, with new payment kiosks and no need to display receipts on dashboards.

Here’s How To Park and Pay:

Park in a numbered space defined by the new space marker posts.
Get your 4- or 5-digit space number from the space marker.
Pay for your parking time by entering the space number at the curbside payment kiosk or entering the zone and space numbers on your mobile device using Parkmobile.
Be on your way! No need to display a receipt on your dashboard.

Pay-By-Space is available on streets around the Verizon Center, National Portrait Gallery, National Building Museum, MLK, Jr. Library and Ford’s Theater, between E Street and H Street, NW, and 3rd Street and 11th Street, NW. It includes approximately 1,000 parking spaces.”

14 Comment

  • hopefully they raise the prices even more if demand supports it. This could be a very successful program if managed correctly. The price differential right now is so minor most people probably won’t even bother to figure out which blocks are cheaper.

    • Yeah…only people who can afford to drive to Chinatown should be able to. Why stop at 2.75? Let’s get it up to an even $10 an hour.

      • Anybody who wants to can drive to Chinatown, but we should charge $10 an hour if they want to park on the street.

        • Why? that is more expensive than a parking garage. Might as well park in one of the garages and have shelter for your vehicle

          • Parking on the street is more convenient for short stints, so it should demand a premium for short stints. If you’re parking for a while, a garage makes good sense; this makes it less likely people will circle forever looking for street parking to avoid garage rates, since they’ll be more or less paying them anyway. There’s some data (in Chicago, I think, and admittedly not that scientific, but still) that a lot of rush-hour traffic can be ascribed to people circling for street parking.
            .
            This is a great policy all-around.

  • They don’t actually need to raise prices, but to change the policy which allows anyone with a handicapped hang-tag (or plates) to park free all day, every day. Fully half (or more) of cars parked in this area are commuters who park at meters and pay nothing.

    I’d suggest emulating Arlington’s “all may park, all must pay” system.

    • Ask and you shall receive. All may park, all must pay will be implemented in early 2017, along with the addition of exclusive, handicap-only, ADA accessible red-top meters.

      • Wow, I thought this (along with church parking) was one of DC’s sacred cows. This is great news – thanks for the info.

        • Note: only in the central business district, not city wide. Because any rational policy has to be implemented with a high degree of confusion by DDOT

    • What’s up with the disability placards in DC? I’ve never seen an area in the U.S. with so many of them. It’s kind of nuts.

      • Unlimited free parking. People find a way to be “disabled” or to borrow a friend or relative’s permit. It is a truly broken system, that thankfully looks to be coming to an end.

  • The legend isn’t visible in my view. Anyone care to share what the yellow, blue, and green spaces are?

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