GDoN “quintessential urban row home” edition

625 5th Street Northeast

This unit is located at 625 5th Street, Northeast. The listing says:

“The quintessential urban row home located in historic Capitol Hill. This Ditto home offers 3BR+Den (potential 4th BR), 2.5BA, expansive open floor plan with oversized windows, white oak floors, custom cabinetry throughout, expansive private roof deck w/ city views, and PKG. Minutes from Union Station, and vibrant H St. Corridor. By DITTO.”

GDoN

You can see more photos here.

This 3 bed/2.5 bath is going for $1,295,000 ($191 monthly fee.)

Ed. Note: Unit 1 is a 2 bed/2.5 bath going for $1,095,000.

36 Comment

  • “Quintessential row home” is the exact opposite of what this is.

  • So if I am remembering that block correctly this house was built on a pretty well manicured side yard for the adjacent house. I was always jealous of the large lot and pretty garden.

    • Well housing a rich person so he/she/they don’t renovate an existing property instead is probably better for society than a pretty garden. There’ll be other pretty gardens.

  • HaileUnlikely

    Somebody who’s into this stuff: are these blinding white boxes with flat doors and drawer faces what one calls “custom cabinetry” these days? And is “custom cabinetry” a selling point? Sh!t, I like mine better than these. And mine are builder-grade from the late 1970’s and extensively water damaged.
    .
    I actually like the rest of this more than I care to admit. I don’t $1.3M like it, but other than the cabinets it’s nice enough.

    • Same here. This isn’t my style at all, but I actually like it a lot. Porbably is worth the $1.3M because of the location.

    • I mean, here’s the thing. Cabinetry, by it’s very nature, is custom because it’s made to fit into a specific size/space. So the whole “custom cabinetry” is somewhat redundant.

      • That cabinetry is custom because it goes all the way to the ceiling. If it’s non-custom, you’ll have empty space above the tops of the cabinets.

      • HaileUnlikely

        Yeah, good point. I just mean, is the kind of cabinetry that this place has regarded as desirable these days?

        • I don’t know but it seems like every new kitchen has white or grey cabinets. Not sure how I feel about white kitchen cabinets and keeping them spotless.

        • I hate these kitchen cabinets, BUT cabinets that do not go all the way to the ceiling are a pet peeve of mine.

          • You don’t want to fill the top of your cabinets with tchotchkes and house plants that collect grease and dust and require a yearly cleaning (like my parents house)?

          • Ha! So true…
            My previous house had white cabinets. One thing you have to be careful about is the grime that can get into creases and trim. At least these would be easy enough to wipe down.

          • Exactly! There should never be any space between cabinets and the ceiling. And these are just “blinded by the white!”

    • accendo

      Ditto seems to like that look. It’s quite similar to the row houses they built at 5th & Q NW.

    • Yes. White counters and cabinets are in style. I am pretty unconcerned about kitchens–besides my preference for closed kitchens–but we put in something similar because we thought it would hold value if we had to sell in the next few years.

    • I’d say it’s a very Scandinavian design choice. European flats have been doing kitchen styles like that for a long time. And now here in the states as square footage gets smaller people are marketing ‘euro-flat’ aesthetics a lot more as a way to make tiny spaces seem chic and worth the price tag. The whole mono-color, no hardware look very much fits that bill.

      At least in my unqualified opinion…

    • I’ve looked at a couple of Ditto homes recently and they love this white thing. I’m a big fan of white open airy spaces but I find their spaces too aggressively white (if that makes any sense). I looked at their project on 11th and T and almost immediately walked out when I saw that.

  • This doctor’s office has a very stylish waiting room.

  • A+ staging and photography

    • Re photography: seriously? Way too much ceiling in these photos. Someone needs a tilt shift.

  • Not a fan of the all white bathrooms. Sure – they look great in the photos of this space, but unless you are OCD about cleaning, which basically means fully cleaning that bathroom every single time you set foot into it – it’s going to look terrible. That white floor tile will show every hair, every water spot, every skin follicle.

    • Meh, chances are pretty high those skin follicles will also be white, so they’ll just blend in. Hair will turn white eventually as well – just wait it out.

      • I have all white and I hate it! On one hand, yeah I guess you know how dirty the floor is. On the other hand, tri-weekly vacuum + dry swiffer + wet swiffer + second dry swiffer gets old very fast. Also white tile grout on the floor is going to be dingy in no time. No amount of cleaning will fix that.

        • My bathroom has white tile and it’s fine. My girlfriend’s black hair shows up really well against it, but it drives me a lot less crazy than the dark green tile in our kitchen. At least white doesn’t show every single speck of lint and water spots.

      • Ah but the people buying these houses may be white but they aren’t staying in them long enough for their hair to go white.

  • is that siding vinyl? for $1.3m, i’d expect the brick at least to be painted over to hide the cracks and disappearing mortar.

  • very “american psycho.”

  • I live on the same block as these two apartments and what I do not understand is why the builders did not put any windows on the south side of the building (the side with the terrible looking vinyl siding). There is not a party wall and I think it was a missed opportunity to distinguish the space from other apartments in the area. Hopefully the new owners like giant white walls with east-west windows.

    • The most likely reason is that the Ditto house is built to the lot line, and you can’t put windows on a lot line wall as it could (theoretically) one day be built over, leaving no fire separation between properties.

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