GDoN “Welcome to Shangri-La!” edition

This house is located at 1850 Redwood Terrace, Northwest. The listing says:

“Welcome to Shangri-La! 1/2+ acres the city’s most impressive private garden, inside over 6800 sqft in this classic tudor. The house and grounds will make your jaw drop. 3 story foyer with dramatic central staircase, large scaled rooms for entertaining. wood paneled library, dual master baths, huge party room with sep. kitchen, Koi ponds, custom pool, elevator, 3 car gar and more! Steps to RCPark”

You can see more photos here.

This 6 bed/5 full/2 half bath is going for $1,950,000.

28 Comment

  • Meh.
    .
    I can’t get really excited about wooded lots with water features in DC. While I’d normally love the yard, all I can think about it sticky with bugs.

  • Ugly parquet looking floors. Fixtures are dated, kinda ugly. It feels stuffy. The grounds are very, very nice, but if I had $2M I could find something a lot better.

    • I hate pretty much the entire interior, but that pool looks heavenly. It’s a shame for my real estate fantasies that so many of the grand old houses with pools tend toward this dated, traditional style. Now to wander over to some SoCal and Pacific Northwest real estate listings for proper daydreaming…

  • HaileUnlikely

    I often run by this house on the weekend and wondered what it (and many others in this area) are like inside. Now I know. I don’t love it, but if I were to magically inherit or something (not gonna happen), I could probably figure out how to get by in there…

  • It amazes me how much housing prices have gone up in some parts of the District but not others. The house is kind of dated, but $2 million for a house with lush gardens and a koi pond doesn’t seem outrageous to me compared to what other houses are going for in better locations. (Not that I have $2 million sitting around or anything.)

    • HaileUnlikely

      Agreed personally, though I suspect that most who would be looking at this house at all would probably disagree with many of us here regarding what constitutes a “better location.”
      .
      I have no idea whether or to what extent the following is likely to impact home values when the homes in question are like this and are already in this price range, but this neighborhood was zoned to Coolidge High School until last year (now zoned to Wilson).

      • But it’s been zoned Shepherd Elementary & Deal Middle throughout, and since Deal feeds to Wilson the only way a child living in this house would wind up at Coolidge would be if s/he didn’t do DCPS for middle school.

        For what it’s worth there’s a lot of chatter about removing Shepherd from the Deal feeder system, but it’ll be another decade at least…

      • I don’t understand what the benefit is to living here. Yeah, the houses are stately, but Shepherd/Deal/Wilson is a good school district only by DC standards; you could get a mighty nice (if not this big) place in Bethesda or Potomac for $2M and get much better schools. Plus this part of DC is not close to any retail or a metro, other than perhaps downtown Silver Spring, which in any event you have to drive to. I’d live here if I had a ton of $$ was going to drive to work and didn’t care about parking, and had enough money for private schools.

        • Not all rich people have kids. If I was in the market for a house this big I’d want to live in the city, as opposed to Bethesda or Potomac, because I don’t care about schools and I’d like to live someplace where I could quickly and cheaply Uber to bars/shopping/restaurants (my job is in VA so I’m stuck driving to work no matter what).

          • Same, not all people want to live in Maryland.

          • If you’re talking about a couple with no kids, then a house this big seems like overkill. But to each his or her own. Also, it’s at least a 15 minute drive from here to Columbia Heights, which is the closest neighborhood in DC that offers anything in the way of nightlife. That’s really not so close. And good lord, if my job was in Virginia and I had no kids and $2M, this is the last place I’d want to live. I’d live in Arlington or Old Town all day long.

          • Well, I think a house this big is overkill with or without kids.
            To each their own though. You couldn’t pay me to live in VA.

        • HaileUnlikely

          For the most part, I suspect that people who buy houses like this on lots like this value proximity to retail and metro significantly less than you and I do and have no desire to live in the midst of a dense urban environment. Potential buyers of this aren’t weighing it against a rowhouse in Logan or Shaw.
          .
          I disagree that you “have to drive” to Silver Spring. This is 0.7 miles to Silver Spring. I am 0.65 miles from Takoma and have been walking to/from the metro daily for years. I suspect that people who live here will primarily drive by choice (whether to the metro or straight to wherever they’re going), but from here to downtown Silver Spring is a perfectly reasonable walk. You do make a good point regarding Bethesda / Potomac, though. At this price point I’d rather live in Bethesda than here.

          • @HaileUnlikely. From this property, it’s a one mile walk to the heart of the silver spring entertainment district. Doable? Sure. But if proximity to retail is important to me and I had $2M to spend? Nah.

      • HaileUnlikely

        Also, I find it interesting and downright mind-blowing that their land (0.58 acres) is only assessed at $380K. This strikes me as shockingly low in relation to land assessments elsewhere.

      • I am not sure that people who have $2 million to spend on the house (and possibly any updates) care about the school zoning. They likely send their kids to private schools.

    • To me, the $2M price tag is a “discount” because the owners know that it needs to be modernized. As a side note, I don’t think prospective owners are concerned about school districts or “Columbia Heights Nightlife” or public transportation. This would be your Bethesda or Potomac Mansion in the city that provides closer albeit not direct access to Downtown DC, Upper NW and Georgetown Area amenities via Rock Creek Park.

      • HaileUnlikely

        Agreed. I know somebody who owned a rowhouse in Adams Morgan for about 20 years, made a fortune when he sold it, and moved to this neighborhood (about a block from this house) when he was old enough and his life had changed enough that the amenities of Adams Morgan and the like no longer appealed to him.

      • If you don’t care about proximity to public transport, proximity to your job, or proximity to retail/nightlife, then why do you want to live “in the city” anyway? I’m not at all convinced it’s any faster to get to Downtown DC from here than from Bethesda or Arlington. It’s not that I would never want to live at this location; it’s just that if I had this type of money to spend, I’d give up a little bit of space and get so much more elsewhere in terms of convenience and amenities.

        • HaileUnlikely

          The universe of persons whose preferences differ vastly from the preferences of people who live in dense urban areas is vast. I don’t understand how people live in places like Potomac or McLean or Loudoun County, but they do nonetheless. Many of them likely didn’t actively prioritize living “in McLean,” just as the buyer here likely does not actively prioritize living “in the city,” just picked the place that they liked, and it happened to be where it was. If I were, say, just for example, a highly-compensated lobbyist and I presently lived in one of those places, and desired to shorten my commute while still enjoying more or less the same type of environment, I could see this neighborhood having a lot of appeal.

          • Yeah, aside from the schools argument, which I genuinely know nothing about, I don’t understand what advantage you’d have living in VA or MD over this neighborhood. It’s not like houses in McLean are any cheaper, and I don’t think you have to worry about crime in this part of DC.

        • Why is it important to get to Downtown DC? Lots of people don’t work there, or anywhere near there (it’s been years since I’ve set foot on K Street myself).
          It’s not like properties this big are common in the middle of the city, so you’d have to compromise somewhere. Like you, I’d rather live in something smaller in a more centralized location (although being this close to RCP does sound lovely), but what we want isn’t what everyone else wants. I generally think that more density is better, but I appreciate that there are pockets of the city where you can live like this.

        • @anon. There comes a point in some people’s lives where you still like the amenities of living in the city, such as fine dining, shows, clubbing/nightlife, museums, exhibits etc but when you go home at night you fancy a more suburban feel to avoid some of the downsides of city life that are posted on this blog daily like noise, loitering, personal security, lack of entertaining space, child safety etc.

          Areas North Portal, Kalorama, Crestwood and other upper NW area neighborhoods allow a balance of suburban life in the city. For some, you do not have to be able to walk to everything in the city to be able to enjoy it.

  • If I were a Real Housewife of New Jersey, I would totally buy this house.

  • To those that think this house, while dated, is not close to public transport: I live a few blocks over, and I’d argue that this is a sweet spot in terms of public transportation if one is to live in the DC suburbs. 1) You’re a 10-15 min walk to SS metro, which connects to green/yellow after 2 stops; 2) 10 minute walk to S2, S4, S9 and S1 buses on 16th; 3) plenty of car2go’s around because they can’t be parked over the border in DC; 4) a $10-12 UberX ride from U Street; and 4) plenty of parking, if you have to use your car as a last resort. On that last note, if you have to use your car, you’re so close to both sides of downtown by either taking 16th/rock creek or Georgia Avenue. Finally, to boot, if you’re a runner, its a great neighborhood to use your own feet as transportation!

    This coming from a former Logan Circle dweller who still enjoys the nightlife and restaurants that downtown has to offer.

    • To those that think this house, while dated, is not close to public transport: I live a few blocks over, and I’d argue that this is a sweet spot in terms of public transportation if one is to live in the DC suburbs. 1) You’re a 10-15 min walk to SS metro, which connects to green/yellow after 2 stops; 2) 10 minute walk to S2, S4, S9 and S1 buses on 16th; 3) plenty of car2go’s around because they can’t be parked over the border in MD; 4) a $10-12 UberX ride from U Street; and 4) plenty of parking, if you have to use your car as a last resort. On that last note, if you have to use your car, you’re so close to both sides of downtown by either taking 16th/rock creek or Georgia Avenue. Finally, to boot, if you’re a runner, its a great neighborhood to use your own feet as transportation!

      This coming from a former Logan Circle dweller who still enjoys the nightlife and restaurants that downtown has to offer.

      • UberX has changed the way I’ve thought about this part of the city. It used to seem isolated, and a hassle because you’d end up driving a lot, but you really can get to lively parts of the city quickly and cheaply with Uber. An Uber from the suburbs is going to cost at least twice as much, so I do think this location has an advantage over VA and MD.

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