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  • 1700 block of T Street NW

    no idea

  • randomduck

    1700 block of T Street NW. No idea about the flag, even after trying to find it all over the place.

    • Yeah, recognized it was T St. right way, and the visible house number made determining the block easy. The flag, not so easy.

  • I’ve been searching for what on earth this flag is….even searching flag terms (i.e. trefoil cross, counterchange trefoil flag, etc) isn’t delivering anything. Googling whats at that address didn’t help either (a nonprofit registered there along the lines of Therapentic Equine Program/Foundation).

    I’m so curious as to what the flag is possibly for.

    • It is the flag of St. Michaels, Maryland. See it here: http://www.stmichaelsmuseum.org/store.pdf

      • Thank you! I spent a stupid amount of time trying to identify it when I should have been sleeping. Compulsive tendencies would have had me revisiting repeatedly for the few weeks. What a relief . . .

        • Oh yeah, flag stumped me and had me looking, too. Even more after it was identified today.

          The wavy lines signaled water to me (correctly), and the colors of the cross in the middle reminded me of the unusual Maryland flag (also correctly), the only heraldic U.S. state flag.

          That’s a Latin cross bottony fitchy in the middle. Latin for longer bottom arm (v. Greek crosses which are like plus signs); bottony for the trefoil ends of the top three arms, and fitchy for the pointed bottom arm.

          I’m still wondering what family’s crest it is derived from. I finally learned today where that unusual Maryland. flag comes from (2 family crests, and a fascinating history of civil war symbolism) – never learned this as a kid as I didn’t grow up around here. And that the DC flag is direct from the coat of arms of George Washington’s family (formerly Wessington) that dates back to the 12th century – who knew? – here I always thought it was so modern looking.

          There’s even a British royal corporation, the College of Arms, that keeps track of official heraldic symbols, and which designed the Montgomery County Md. flag, also derived from the ancient crests of two families.

  • Wow, I had no idea there were houses like that around Dupontish.

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