Seasonal Pantry Not Pleased with For Lease Sign – Staying Open through April

SP
1314 ½ Ninth Street, NW

Thanks to those who passed on – Seasonal Pantry posts on their facebook page:

“My classy land lord just did this to Seasonal Pantry. I’m paying for the space till the end of April. Can they do this? Mind you I just had my window smashed and paid for it myself last week.”

24 Comment

  • Did SP ask him/her about its placement? Did SP refer to its lease agreement for its rights and its landlord’s rights? Seems like immediately posting on FB is not the most “classy” thing either.

  • If you don’t like the sign, tell the landlord you’ll pay rent for the space the whole time it’s vacant if they wait until then to advertise it. If you don’t want to pay, don’t be childish and complain on a blog. The landlord is more than entitled to put that tiny little sign in the window; in fact, they could put a giant banner fifteen times as big across the front if they so chose.

  • Come on. This isn’t the Macy’s Christmas Display Window. Let the landlord have his or her sign.

    It’s not like the landlord’s gonna move someone in before you move out.

    Props to the landlord for trying to avoid a vacant storefront.

    • Also, I just read the entry on Capitol Checkers. If your lease is a “triple net” (property taxes, repairs, and insurance), that window would have been your responsibility anyway per the lease terms you agreed to.

  • I don’t know about retail but in all of the residential leases I’ve signed, there’s a clause that says in the event the lease isn’t renewed, the landlord can place a “for rent” sign in front of and advertise the property. I don’t see why retail would be different. I mean, they presumably would want to have a new tenant by April 1, so they can’t just start advertising then. Are you planning on paying the landlord’s mortgage while the space sits empty? Seriously, you sound awfully whiney. It’s not like they put up a giant banner or something. It’s not even on the front of the window or covering your business name.

  • The person complaining is the one that comes off as completely immature in this instance. Good riddance.

    • Immature? They’ve cultivated a specific aesthetic and the sign looks cheap. On the other hand, I bet there is a clause in the lease allowing the landlord to advertise, so maybe the tenants should work with the landlord to create a better-looking sign?

      • Cultivated an aesthetic? They’ve got a month and a half left in their lease (presumably they’ll be in the less-than-aesthetically pleasing moving out phase during part of that). They can live with the sign or work with the landlord to come up with a more attractive alternative. Whining about it on social media is the very definition of immature.

    • +1,000
      .
      The landlord did this “to” his business? Sounds incredibly victim-y for someone who has a 12″x18″ sign in the window.
      .
      And hey, did the guy ever think that if the landlord put this sign up, presumably to get people to *notice* it, that he might even get a few new people to notice his store? People with this victim mentality are *so* exhausting! Change your perspective and it’s a good thing!

  • At first I thought the OP was upset because the landlord hadn’t told her that he wasn’t renewing SP”s lease.

    But if the OP knew all along that SP had the space only through April, I’m not sure what the big deal is.

  • The tenant/chef has a bad attitude. We did a seasonal pantry dinner a few months ago and spent the entire night eating excellent food that was frequently interrupted with him complaining about his landlord, other DC chefs and restaurants, and explaining ad nauseam why his method was by far superior to others in the city. The meal was incredibly well-prepared, but for the cost it would have been nice to actually enjoy it. Hopefully his new landlord doesn’t affect his mood so much because he is certainly talented.

    • Went in the market once; got awful, rude service from snobby people. Never went back. Good luck and good riddance.

    • That’s too bad. The times I’ve been in he’s been very nice, easy to chat with while I’m doing my shopping.

      • Agree – I went once and my boyfriend and I sat at the end of the table closest to the kitchen. He was very friendly and talked us through the menu with stories behind each dish. Very sad to see this place leave!!

    • I couldn’t agree more. Every interaction I’ve ever had with the owner has been unpleasant. He’s just got a horrible attitude, and he seems to think he is the best thing to happen to food since the creation of fire. I’ve heard of some people enjoying that place, but nobody in the neighborhood could ever stand him. On the upside, his bad attitude was the topic of many a lively neighborhood backyard barbecue!

  • Check your lease for landlord rights as others have mentioned.

  • I’m a little surprised that everyone is anti-tenant here. Obviously, we don’t know what lease says. But, contrary to everyone else’s experiences in comments, my residential lease experience has been that landlords dont show without permission of tenants. Commercial totally different obviously. But realistically this type of commercial space (on street with little traffic) is not rented by someone seeing sign in window. Wonder if not an FU from landlord to tenant, after what seems like tumultuous relationship.

  • What’s the big deal? They’re moving out right? I don’t see how this has any impact on the current tenant. Why shouldn’t owner advertise the space?

  • phl2dc

    Waaaaaaaaah wah wah wah…

  • justinbc

    This has has been one of the biggest whiny brats to ever grace to DC culinary scene. I remember him getting furious that Astro and GBD “stole” his fried chicken and donut shop idea, that he had never implemented (and that had been going strong in other cities long before DC). Then boasting on Top Chef about his #1 ranked restaurant in the city and subsequently not making it past the first episode. He’s emblematic of a generation, I won’t be sad to see him gone.

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