“No Questions Asked – We Want Our Kids’ Baby Pictures Back”

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From Mintwood Place in Adams Morgan.

Update from OP:

We found our time machine with all the baby pictures…in our house on the 4th floor, under a table, where the Verizon guy had moved it when he was here in the summer. We felt lucky it was that hidden, as the thief only took Macs, leaving available PC laptops behind.

The story is here.

(I feel foolish believing it was stolen and then finding it, but I’m more thankful than embarrassed., but in a very thankful way.)”

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14 Comment

  • Ouch. Most likely doing the right thing by backing up data and got the backup stolen as well.

    Best of luck trying to track it down. If you can – search your Gmail for the serial numbers to provide police and/or log into support.apple.com.

    ICloud.com will track the location of the MacBook if you have that turned on.

  • This sucks so bad! I’ve had a few friends lose baby pictures due to a stolen camera (shoulda uploaded the photos!) and corrupted hard drive (shoulda backed them up externally!). There’s always lots of “shouldas” in these situations, but it doesn’t take away the fact that you’ve lost a record of precious memories. I hope they are able to get the photos back!

  • justinbc

    For those not using an Apple (or even if you do and don’t want to use their cloud service), Flickr has a nice tool now that will scan for any new photos on your system on a schedule and upload them automatically to a private directory that you can then set to share, keep private, etc.

  • Interesting that they chose to use the word lost instead of stolen.

    • It looks like in the first sentence they say lost/stolen, but the picture cuts off everything after the “st”. But I would agree with lost being an interesting choice of wording. Maybe they thought if they didn’t accuse someone of stealing it they would be more likely to get it back?

    • They used both, as you can see in the second picture.

  • I like the idea behind this note, and I hope it works out for the poster. It should be obvious (but who knows), but PLEASE be careful if the exchange actually happens. Not sure the best way to orchastrate it, but posting a flyer saying you will exchange $1,000 CASH for goods at a metro stop might attract some unwanted attention.

    • Yep. I bet they get a few calls from people who all say they have the computer. If you are actually going to meet someone who calls you, with $1000 in cash, at least call the police beforehand and tell them what you are doing.

      • LOL – call the police to tell them you are essentially paying a ransom to get your stolen goods back from someone you don’t know and you’d like for them to be on stand-by in case something goes wrong? I’m sure they’ll play along.

        • Did I say call the police and ask them “to be on standby in case something goes wrong”? No. I said call the police and tell them what you are planning to do. I’m guessing if you called the police and said you were meeting the person who allegedly stole your laptop, and you were meeting them with $1000 in cash, they would address it a little differently than “we’ll be on standby in case something goes wrong.”

  • jburka

    Please, please, please, everyone, start using a cloud backup service. Backblaze and Crashplan are generally the best and roughly $5/month for unlimited storage. If everything is in one location, you don’t have a valid backup strategy. This could just as easily be a power overload, flood, or fire.

  • Posting a note offering a cash reward to a stanger is unbelievably dangerous and, sorry to say it, dumb idea. People have been killed for far less than $1,000 in this town. This is DC, not Mayberry.

  • That’s one reason I stick with film. Much harder to lose pictures.

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