GDoN “Top-to-bottom renovation of 1900s-built end unit” edition

This house is located at 2208 Q Street, Northwest. The listing says:

“Top-to-bottom renovation of 1900s-built end unit townhome in prime Dupont location with multiple fireplaces and in-law suite. Home features top of the line finishes and hardwood throughout its six bedrooms and five and a half baths. Ample outdoor spaces include upper-floor balcony, rear deck, and patio with parking for two cars.”

You can see more photos here.

This 6 bed/5.5 bath is going for $2,299,900.

15 Comment

  • wow spectacular place. will be interesting to see what it goes for.

  • I Dont Get It

    Three vessel sinks!!!!!!

  • For the money, the kitchen is pretty underwhelming.

    • I think the adage that “kitchens sell houses” is probably more apt for a $200k home than a $2M home. It’s certainly a modern kitchen which isn’t going to appeal to everyone though it seems a good kitchen for a family which certainly could appeal to a lot of prospective buyers. I doubt a $2M buyer is going to look and say that the appliances are not Viking or Wolf and pass on the home. I don’t think DC buyers are all that discerning about those things anyway.

      • I can’t really tell about appliance in the pictures, so that wasn’t my concern. Its the size/layout that struck me. I disagree though that the adage is more applicable to lower priced homes. The more you spend on something, the more you scrutinize and a smaller kitchen may standout. I’m saying this, though, because nice kitchens are something that I personally always look for in a house.

        • Same here (my house came with a Thermador oven and it’s the worst oven I’ve ever had; low-end appliances are just fine!). I think it’s mostly the layout and design that are so bad. I wouldn’t have a problem with the size, but for the money I’d expect something a little bit bigger.

          • For this price, the cabinets should be custom built and made to fit into the space (e.g., why is there random empty space above each cabinet and to the left of the range?). The layout and cabinet choices are less than amateur grade….in fact I’m pretty sure I could have done a better job planning out this kitchen, and I’m not even that great at design.

          • One more point…the fact that the cabinets don’t reach the ceiling and/or have doors all swinging in the same direction (e.g., two base cabinets to the left of the range that should open from the center, not be separate, left hinge openers) indicates to me that these are at about the IKEA-level of stock sizes, not even something semi-custom that would be designed to better fit the space..

  • HaileUnlikely

    I think I could be quite content living in this house. I see things that I don’t like, but I could fix all of them myself without spending much. The phrase “top to bottom renovation” is usually a clue that it is not what most would call a “good deal,” though.

  • The living/dining room area is so ugly. I guess you could put walls back in but that’s a lot of work; for $2+ million I’d want something a little more move-in ready. I agree with GBinCH that the kitchen is not that great either. It looks like it gets a lot of natural light but otherwise it’s kind of small.

  • I like the bedrooms, but there’s something so incongruous about modernizing (sanitizing) a turn-of-the-century home. These renovations always look better when they retain some of the home’s character, blending it with updated features.

  • justinbc

    I think this is a great deal, I love so much about the design and very few things I dislike. That back wall is swoon worthy, as are the dark wood floors. I actually find the kitchen quite attractive.

  • Ceiling pot lights are always bad. As in ALWAYS. Except for a low ceiling cheap basement rental apt. They are ugly, unflattering, annoying and horrible in every possible way.

  • Overall staging is horrendous with cheap undersized furniture. Fixtures in Kitchen, bathrooms and powder rooms are underscale cheap in appearance.

  • i would guess that the majority of negative comments are from people who could not afford to buy this home. It is easy to be critical when you are only browsing.

    No home is perfect, even ones at this price range. The key factor for any buyer is if the positives significantly outweigh the negatives.
    Even if you build a home, there are always things you would do differently in hindsight. I have been there.

    Given location, a rental unit, 2 car parking, and sf, it seems to me to be a reasonable list price, with room for negotiation.

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