Mon. Afternoon Rental Option – Van Ness

2939 Van Ness Street Northwest

This rental is located at 2939 Van Ness Street, NW:

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The listing says:

“Kitchen remodeled three years ago, newer cabinets, counters, floor and lighting. Lovely parquet floors, large kitchen, spacious living room. Balcony. Rent includes ALL utilities (except phone, Internet and cable) AND garage parking. Super location. Pool, fitness ctr. 24 hour desk. Move in fee is $350 Mon-Fri, $450 Sat. Landlord will pay $200 of move-in fee.”

This 1 bed/1 bath is going for $1,875/Mo.

19 Comment

  • Seems overpriced for that quiet, sleepy hamlet of DC. And what’s with the move-in fee?

    • It’s probably not easy to find a 1BR in NW and that close to Metro that isn’t completely run down.

    • Get a clue, loads of buildings have move in fees. I paid it for my renters.

      Nice of the landlord to offer to split.

      • I have rented in DC 10+ years and have never paid a move-in fee. Maybe I am just lucky.

      • I researched “loads” of buildings when I was apartment-hunting, and not one of them had this type of move-in fee. Maybe this is something that’s common with co-ops or condos, but I haven’t seen this with straight-up rental buildings. A few places I looked into charged a flat non-refundable fee (around $500) in lieu of a security deposit, but it seems from the weekday/Saturday differential in this ad that the fee actually is for moving in, and not a form of deposit.

  • Yeah that move-in fee is bunk. The apartment is quite dated but it’s got gas range which is a plus in my book. All utilities plus the parking makes this a not bad deal in my book.

    • we have similar books. Good size near a metro with gas and a balcony. Unless it has some sort of radioactive cockroachrat infestation, this is a steal.

  • Allison

    Man if I was a Howard Law student, I would be all over that apartment.

  • This an absolute steal, particularly considering that the parking and electric is included.

  • I paid about $1600 in the same building for a unit with an identical layout but without a balcony or parking about 3 years ago. I think this is a good deal. Some of the residents are really obnoxious and will complain about anything but I used to throw some great parties in the social room and the pool is awesome. The fitness ctr. sucks.

    The move in fee was about half what it is now 4 years ago…thinking a lot of the owners don’t like all of the renters.

  • we rent a very similar unit for a very similar price in the building. It is a bit outdated but with parking, 2 pools and utilities included it is a nice fit.

    Residents are a bit cranky but its a nice, quiet and convenient atmosphere to be in if it fits your style.

  • I don’t know that area very well, living downtown and all, but it sure looks like a good deal to me. I agree it’s toolish to have the renter pay the move-in fee, but, then again, the rent’s good so it probably comes out in the wash.

    I rent out an apartment that has a move-in fee, but I pay it — not the tenants.

  • re: move in fee….when you’re a condo owner, renters really do a number on community areas during high move in/move out time. The fee is really helpful in offsetting the costs such a painting or repairing carpet. I don’t expect renters to know why this type of fee is important. Ideally, the fee helps limit turnover, which creats stability and limits damage in a place that many people call home.

    Our rental property (which I lived in for 4 years prior to turning it in to a rental) has a small one ($150 I think) and is going to try to increase it – I support it. And I paid the move in fee for our tenants. It’s a business expense, and for $150 or whatever the cost is, I can be a sport for good tenants.

    • I don’t think the move-in fee is designed to do anything but cover potential damage and raise revenue for the association. It’s not designed to discourage turnover.

    • ah

      Why not charge a lower fee to cover the guy who operates the elevator and unlocks the doors, and then obligate the mover to pay any damages they cause?

  • It’s to discourage turnover. Without it, absentee landlords (most of them lacking a business license and many claiming homestead deductions) would have renters in and out — much to the annoyance and expense of owners. It’s normal, customary, and good. Renters don’t mind paying it, if the unit is fairly priced in a nice building. Landlords can make it part of the package.

  • As a Van Ness resident, this sounds like a good deal to me!

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