9:30 Club Voted Number 1 “Venues that Rock” in Rolling Stone Magazine

Photo by PoPville flickr user Laura_Grageda

Well this is awesome. From Rolling Stone:

“Rolling Stone polled 26 insiders and musicians – from top managers to Fall Out Boy’s Patrick Stump – and came up with a list of the nation’s coolest large clubs and theaters.”

And for 9:30 Club in part they write:

Since moving to a larger location in 1996, playing the 1,200-capacity club has remained a rite of passage for indie acts on the rise. Says Fall Out Boy’s Patrick Stump, “It’s got so much character, you wonder if the locals know how lucky they are.”

39 Comment

  • Emmaleigh504

    I saw a tweet about this yesterday and thought the band gave them that rank. I feel like a maroon.

  • I guess it is a pretty nice venue, but I always thought it would be better if they actually had some decent competition pushing them. All the other good venues in town are quite a bit smaller, and the ones that are bigger, pretty much suck for rock shows.

      • Thats not exactly true. The fillmore is just as accessable to people and packs the same size ( possibly a tad more). Also, Empire in Springfield can hold 800-1000 (930 club holds ~1200). Howard theater has been getting shows 930 usually gets too.

        • Yeah, but he was talking about venues in DC.

        • I hate to cast myself as an arch-hipster, but the Fillmore Silver Spring seems like it has mainly very commercially-popular, run-of-the-mill acts. It’s sad because it’s using a classic rock-and-roll name (read about Bill Graham and the Fillmore in San Fran/Fillmore East in NYC). The variety of acts at 9:30, though, is unparalleled. It’s the only place where you can see Dubstep, alt-country, rock, bluegrass, indie, hip-hop, comedy, experimental music, punk, and anything else, all in the same venue (partly because they can move the stage back and forth to expand or contract the size of the floor). To those who say it doesn’t have character – sure the space looks very clean and new for the most part, but graffiti and odor are not always necessary for vibe. For competition, maybe the Black Cat comes close in having very “in” musical acts, though it is quite a bit smaller. Howard Theater is a very exciting addition too, especially for jazz, experimental and world music.

    • As far as I can tell, “competition” among venues can benefit touring artists, who can try to spark a bidding war. But when that happens, it results in higher ticket prices — good for the artist, not good for concertgoers.

      I can see how “competition” might have some benefit as far as spurring a venue to, say, start taking credit cards if competing venues are doing so.

    • Howard Theatre is competition. 930 club is near perfect- other cities have used it as a model for how to build a live music venue.

    • Not as big, but The Hamilton has been putting on some phenomenal shows and the club is fantastic. Great atmosphere – great sound – pretty awesome venue. In DC.

  • DÜDE!

  • Still yet, no Deftones for the past 2 years… 🙁

    I’m not really a fan of the acts that come through the Fillmore.

  • I like 9:30, but does it really have that much character? I guess I’m one of those locals that doesn’t know how lucky I am.

  • I don’t think the 9:30 Club has much character at all, but it’s a fantastic place to see a show.

    • I agree. It’s kind of like Nationals Park. Excellent place to watch a ballgame, but zero character.

      • I think it’s great, the perfect size for a stage venue… Reminds me of the days before I became a musician myself, when everything was magical and mystifying… I only wish the grunge era never died… New bands are too “hipsterish” these days for my liking, it’s my fault for being an old jaded “purist” though, I know that.

        • +1000 new music is very hipster these days. I find it really annoying. I was also a huge fan of the grunge era, but I do think there is a lot of really great music coming out but it just doesn’t get the attention bullshit hipster bands get. I really like Pelican, Giant Squid, Elder, and Chelsea Wolf. I do think the 930 as a venue is one of the best. I haven’t looked at the article yet, but I would hope that the Electric Factory and the TLA in Philadelphia would be up there too.

          • I agree w/ you on TLA, but could not disagree more about the Electric Factory. The sound in that place is awful…

            TLA is not on the list, BTW…The Trocadero is, but most of the shows I go to up there are at Johnny Brenda’s, Kung Fu Necktie or Union Transfer. I’ve never been to the Trocadero…

          • I’m not even sure what you mean by new music being too hipsterish. I lived in Seattle through the grunge era, and I think you might have an overly romantic notion of that scene.

          • @cornholiodc I always liked the Electric Factory, my husband was a much bigger fan of the TLA. I have been to the Trocadero and it is awesome. It is a very small venue but it is worth the trip. @kenyondweller As for a romatic veiw of the grunge era…I prolly do and I am not going to apologize for it 🙂

          • Welcome to getting old 🙂

          • I agree. And that’s why I only listed to megaphone crooners on Edison discs.

          • @anonymous…LOL! and yes, I am getting old! I went to a Helmet show at the Black Cat last year and someone in the crowd shouted out “Make me feel young again!” and I realized….shit! I am OLD!

  • Totally agree. The 930 Club is one excellent thing about living in DC which – in my humble opinion – has pretty piss poor nightlife.

  • I mean shit if the guy from Fall Out Boy thinks it’s great, I’m sold!

  • This isn’t the first award the 9:30 Club has gotten — VHS polled bands years ago and they ranked the 9:30 Club as one of the best live venues in the country. In the same year, techno acts ranked Nation as one of the best venues for their music, so we were lucky to have both for a while.

  • I think the 9:30 Club is a stellar venue.

    Full disclosure: I work for the club occasionally… but I thought highly of it during the years I went there before I started working there.

    The sight lines are good, the sound system is good, and the venue posts set times and sticks to them. (On the rare occasion that the set times are off, it’s usually because the band showed up late, etc.) There are always pitchers of ice water for customers to avail themselves of for free — nice for patrons on a budget.

    Shows are all-ages. I was over 21 before I came to the D.C. area, but before that time, I remember how frustrating it was not to be able to see a band because the venue was 18 and over, or to go to a dance club because it was 21 and over.

    I’m not a fan of that blue paint, but otherwise, I think the 9:30 is pretty damn good.

  • Does Fall Out Boy realize how lucky they are to be playing at 9:30 Club?

  • brookland_rez

    Before all the condos went up by the Nats stadium, there was Nation. I saw a lot of great bands play there- Bad Religion, NOFX, and countless others. From what I remember, it was similarly sized to 9:30.

    9:30 built its reputation on punk bands, and I’ve seen countless bands play there, but I can’t think of the last time they had a punk show. They did have Hot Water Music recently.

  • I wish there were more pre-drinking options for 930 Club shows besides Amico/Brixton/VeraCruz.

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