Good Deal or Not? Bonus House Porn Edition


Photo courtesy of Beasley Real Estate

This house is located at 2107 Wyoming Ave, NW:


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A press release says:

On January 1st, Beasley Real Estate put its first property of 2013 under contract. Once the home of The Field School, this 7,000 square foot home has a history as rich as Washington itself. Its list price was $4,000,000.

2107 Wyoming underwent a two-year restoration and renovation, where no expense was spared, this home was featured in the Spring Home and Design issue of the Washington Post Magazine. Every feature and amenity in this spectacular residence resonates quality, craftsmanship and refinement. The home offers 7 large bedrooms in the main house, and a two level carriage house with its own full living quarters. The 1919 residence, awarded an Historic Facade Easement, was previously home to two private Schools, the Sullivan School and the Field School, a Supreme Court Justice and two Bishops.

You can see a virtual tour here.

This 8 Bedrooms, 6 Full Baths, 2 Half Baths is going for $3,999,900.

33 Comment

  • I love this house…have always loved this house.

    BTW, the listing says it was put under contract on Jan. 1 so it should have been listed as a “was it a good deal”.

  • For $4M I want to know where the rest of the kitchen is.

  • Hmmm…dog dishes in the staging? Is this the new equivalent of baking cookies for open houses?

  • This is so much nicer that the last 4mil dollar house posted on PoP.

  • Great house, beautifully restored, but why would you spend $ 4 million and have to park on the street – in that neighborhood?

  • Whoever bought the house, please rent your backyard carriage house to me! I’ll even throw in monthly lawn mowing :)

  • Well, it seems like the last owner or two left lots of money on the table.

    Sold in 2006 for 3.825
    Sold in 2009 for 3.950
    Sold in 2013 for 4.0

    Considering it costs ~10% (~$400K) in transaction costs (realtors, settlement, transfer taxes, fees) just to sell the place, it is costing someone a few hundred thousands of dollars to sell this place, and has the last few owners.

    I love homes in this area of town though.

    • It’s difficult to find buyers at that price level. There’s plenty of buyers for $500K-$1 million townhouses, but very few who can afford the $4 million mark. DC has a lot of expensive houses but it’s hard to keep finding buyers with those kinds of deep pockets, considering that this is a metro area fueled by government expenditures rather than private sector profits.

      I also have a feeling that buyers at that level in that area might be transient to DC (for instance, they are a senior person at the IMF or Treasury after having a lucrative career in the private sector and only in DC for 3-5 years). Once their job is done, they are moving back to London, NYC, or Paris.

      • Um, this is why those uninformed on wealth and income in this country are so confused about the DC real estate market.

        There are plenty of private sector jobs in the DC area. The federal govornment as a major employer does not keep private industry away, it attracts them in truth. Let’s just highlight the finance sector, every finance corp. has a presence in this town. Houses in MD and VA have sold for 1+ million dollars for decades. DC is just now starting to reap the financial benefits of the region due to the drop in crime.

      • the current seller is in the real estate industry and the former seller as mentioned above is in real estate too…. so maybe this house doesn’t attract the buyer you are describing….

      • Funny, I’ve met a couple of lawyers during my 11 years in DC… like one or two.

  • $10k capital range and no exhaust event. Odd. Very odd.

    • It’s pretty, but the kitchen is awkward (it does appear to be two fridges on either side of the fireplace…odd spot for sure), no vent hood (ew, just ew. If the buyer cooks at all, it’s going to be nasty in there), all pedestal sinks (huge pet peeve of mine…where do you put anything?!), whatever is happening to the ceiling in the attic bedroom that it’s covered with scotch tape, and then the creepy portrait moving throughout the house…

      • Not sure the stove doesn’t have a vent. No above hood, but it could have a vent (the pictures aren’t close-up enough to tell). My parents’ stove is in the island in their kitchen and the hood/exhaust fan is built into the stove top and the exhaust is sucked down below the stove. Not sure if that’s the case here, but it could be.

      • i think there is only 1 fridge and it’s in the cabinet to the left of the fireplace. it looks like a Sub-Zero BI-36R. The cabinet to the right of the fireplace is designed to match fridge – but it lacks the panel for the Sub-Zero’s flip up grill on top of the fridge door as visible on the left. The right cabinet also doesn’t have the slightly visible metal trim that surrounds the panels (which could have been avoided if the owner purchased the Sub-Zero’s 736 fully integrated model).

  • Interesting that they mention the historic facade easement. If it’s already in place at closing it would mean that the new buyer can’t take advantage of the income tax deduction (it’s a one-time deal). Assuming the property appraises around list price the easement would probably get you at least a 400K tax deduction.

  • The staging is painful – I wish it looked a little more home and a little less like a staged/magazine spread. As for price – I have no feeling for this end of the market but size is great and has some nice details.

    Normally I don’t catch some thing, but they moved one of the portraits around and it is in 2 different pictures. The first in an entry room and again above a fireplace.

  • as commented on curbed:
    it’s a fantastic house – but in that price range, I would not want a single family home so close to busy Connecticut Avenue. AND i wouldn’t want a apartment building towering over my home nor would i appreciate that building’s loading dock abutting my property. Glad somebody w/ the $$ was able to look past these issues though….

  • Maybe this is a nice house but I cannot get past how ridiculously poorly appointed it is. I love the lamp on the chair in the BR! Alas, money cannot buy taste. And I’ll never understand drapes on porches, even with the looming apartments.

    • curtains on porches are great. whats to not understand?

    • oh honey, the house is staged with rental furniture (but I agree it’s tasteless). The curtains are from the previous owner – and i like them.

      AND while on the subject of taste, the blue tinted windows are just awful! How were they approved by the historic commission?

  • I can’t even pretend to nitpick the small details of this home, like furniture, refrigerator, etc. All I know is those photos just made me feel really really poor. The decor is simple and elegant and everything in there including fixtures looks like high quality to me. But $3,999,900 is so far beyond my scope I couldn’t begin to tell you if that is a good deal. I need House Porn: Efficiency Edition!

  • Ha! I went to high school here. Oh if those walls could talk.

    • What were the academics like in that school? Comparable to Wilson? Or more along the lines of Sidwell?

      • It is a fantastic school – very nurturing with great, well rounded academics. I was really well prepared to attend the highly ranked small liberal arts college I went to and more importantly, Field prepared me well as a human being and as an active community member. Field still exists: http://www.fieldschool.org

  • The design addict in me appreciated aspects of the renovation, but I also felt sad… Perhaps because the staging, as another comment noted, is so cold and personality-less. It was certainly less pretty when it was a high school, but I took the SATs in that wood-paneled dining room which was beautiful then too and the front room that is a formal living room now was where my English class with Will Layman was held… I remember reading Leaves of Grass in there. I spent all four years in that carriage house’s upstairs with Martin Doughrty creating art. He is seven feet tall and was quite a sight to see in that tiny upstairs space. Having classes in rooms with fire places added quirk. The house doesn’t seem so quirky anymore. I hope whoever moves in has kids and brings life back into the house.

  • I went to high school in this building! It has a long, wonderful history — I hope the buyer appreciates it :)

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