DC Presidential Voting Map by Sarah Hank

The following map was made by Sarah Hank. She contributed a crime map of DC here, a sewage and plumbing map of DC here, and a housing values map here.


When DC’s population explodes for a days-long of celebration of the 2nd inauguration of Barack Obama this coming weekend, not everyone will be dusting off their screen printed Obama family portrait sweatshirts or marching to the mall via several human funnels with their YES WE DID signs in tow. Even though DC did go 91% for Obama, there are still quite a few who voted for Mr. Romney. In case you were wondering where those people live, I made this highly predictable map of which voting precincts recorded the highest numbers of votes for Romney on election day. The proportional circles (placed at the center of each census tract – not the same as voting precincts) represent average household income based on the 2010 American Community Survey. If you mouse over the circles, you’ll see average income displayed, and if you mouse over the precinct, you’ll see the percentage vote for Romney and Obama (sorry Jill Stein and Gary Johnson).

42 Comment

  • The blip over by Brookland is interesting. I assume it’s Catholic religious voters near CUA voting for Romney.

  • If the GOP would just ditch the religious fanatics they’d do so much better not just here, but in other urban and near-suburban areas. I cannot say enough how much damage the religious zealots have done among my crowd (young successful 20-somethings). Say you’re a Republican and you’re immediately suspected of harboring deep-seated anti-gay prejudice.

    • I think that says as much about young Liberals as it does the Republican party.

    • Ehhh it’s not just the anti-gay prejudice. It’s the science denial, the misogyny, the racism, the xenophobia, the war-mongering and the denigration of the poor, too.

      • Right, because every single conservative supports all that crap. Thanks for generalizing and proving the point of the commenter before you.

        • The people that conservatives support, support those things. It is one thing if you don’t feel that way about those things, but when you are pulling the trigger to send people to washington that believe those thoughts, you are basically sanctioning that.

        • Well, those things do make up the Republican Party platform and define the policies it advocates for.

        • Doesn’t really matter what you personally support; if you’re voting for modern Republicans, that’s what you’re voting for.

      • And don’t forget the absurd theories of economics that pretty much no serious economist in the world endorses: i.e., the reason there is high unemployment and low growth is because the superwealthy aren’t wealthy enough.

    • jim_ed

      That makes DC’s GOP all the more interesting. Its top 3 leaders are openly gay, they’ve added tolerance to their mission statement, and they’re like an experiment in miniature of whether a moderate GOP can siphon off socially liberal and moderate voters from the democrats.

  • 33% of the Naval Observatory voted for Romney… Since only the vice president lives there does that mean he couldn’t get the vote of 1/3 of his immediate family?

  • Shocker! Rich people were more apt to vote for Mitt “Tax Evading” Romney. This just totally blew my mind.

  • 25% as the upper range seems to skew this whole map. If it was >50% you might have a something.

    • Came here to say the same thing.

      Typical think tank / small interest group agenda.

      Play with the numbers until something interesting pops up that proves what I’m trying to say.

    • None of the precincts voted above 50%. Keep in mind that the scale refers only to those who did vote for Romney, not to all voters.

      The highest percentage of Romney voters live near the Naval Observatory (35%) and the lowest number of votes for Romney came from Mayfair-Parkside (just across the Benning Rd NE bridge) with 3 votes.

  • Interesting to see how the city is divided — I’m a little surprised to see that Capitol Hill looks like Georgetown politically (but maybe not when you consider real estate prices).

  • HEY! Everyone, just to be clear, I did not make this map to start a fight about politics (which may have been naive of me, but it’s true). I was just interested, given our city’s heavy slant toward voting for Democrats, especially Obama, which precincts recorded significant votes for Romney.

    Please do not let this devolve into generalizations and name calling, just take the map for what it is. Thank you, that is all. :)

  • I think this map is pretty good evidence that unlike what some people say, DC’s voting population is definitely not going to remain massively liberal for long. As the wealthy push the poor out, they’re also pushing out the liberals.

    • Wow, there’s a generalization for you.

    • I don’t think this map says that at all. If the richest district in DC (and probably in the entire region) only voted 33% for Romney, I have no clue how you think that means DC is going to be less liberal anytime soon.

    • “sweeping out the liberals”

      1. The poor ex- or soon-to-be ex-residents being swept out the city to make way for newcomers who (you said) are wealthy and therefore (you implied) are better or at least less-expensive citizens (“givers” if you wil). The people getting the boot are Democrats because “takers” are an exclusively Democratic-voting bunch, and the “givers” replacing them are by definition wealthy or at the very least self-sufficient, thus Republican as that party is the natural homen of such a people. Therefore, Republican vote strength will increase along with the city’s average annual household income. Do yourself a favor an compare Romney’s percentage of the vote to Bob Dole’s in 1996, when the city was poorer, with more “takers,” just the sort of people unsuited to present-day Washington living. I expect, at this point, that you’ve deduced that the comparison actually does not support your ill-considered hypothesis. (Ill-considered because your reasoning behind it; GOP vote strength gains could come as a result of a host of factors that having nothing to do with poor people leaving the city and voting Democratic elsewhere.

      (This is exactly the sort of woefully –and perhaps deliberately–uncritical, uninterested thinking that is personified by Mitt Romney, losing GOP nominee in 2012 presidential)

      In addition, the incoming “wealthy” residents can hardly be considered “conservative” or Republican. Perhaps they tend towards fiscal conservatism in heavier numbers; but on social policy, the newer, wealthier residents better reflect the wealthy lot who favor progressivism over restrictivism on social issues. These are the type of voter turning places like suburban Philadelphia, the (historically) Republican environs around New York and Chicago, not to mention areas within the cities that once had a respectable GOP presence, into just an urban area where Democrats net votes. Take Fairfax County, VA, (#1 or 2 nationwide in annual household income) where just 12 years ago G. W. Bush captured a solid 54% of the vote. Though that was before the demogaguery expertly practiced by the Repulican party with respect to social issues in the 2000s, a demographic change. So while Bush won Virginia in 2004 year by about as much as in 2000, his margin in Fairfax Co dropped precipitously, going from +6 to -8, a 14pt swing in only years. In 2012 Obama won just under 60 per cent. So the getting-wealthier-thus-getting-Republican theory doesn’t necessarily pan out.

    • Yeah there is pretty much nothing about the map (or any evidence at all) that supports this conclusion, but that was no obstacle to you in reaching it, was it? You must be a Republican.

  • Look I’m not affiliated with any party but these numbers are so minuscule, this map is a farce. Was this created to scare some dollars out of DNC of DC?

    Hey! We’re all about diversity. Oh wait what!? Not THAT kind of diversity.

  • Holy crap, so many naive people here who probably think they’re experts because they’re studying poly sci. Once you grow up and learn a thing or two from real world experience that doesn’t include a Hill internship or watching Faux News and/or MSNBC, then you can come back here and post a valid comment.

  • good lord. the average income in spring valley is 333,000 a year? in benning heights it’s only 33,000.

  • austindc

    “I made this highly predictable map of which voting precincts recorded the highest numbers of votes for Romney on election day.”

    According to your legend, you made a highly predictable map of which precincts recorded the highest percentages (not numbers) of votes for Romney on election day, focusing only on distinct categories between 0% and 25%, which is how you make a place that voted 91% democrat look like half of it voted republican. The findings are interesting, but the reporting is sloppy.

  • So people with money voted for Romney, got it.

  • Its like a Ying Yang.

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