Good Deal or Not? Weekly Wed. House Porn “custom milled doors” edition

This house is located at 3308 Woodley Rd, NW:


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The listing says:

“Welcome to this classic 1920′s Brick and Stone Residence, expanded to meet today’s lifestyles. Elegant foyer with light filled grand staircase, deep dining room and living room with custom milled doors opening to spacious L shaped kitchen, large glass enclosed family room, outdoor decking and pool,, plus gated open garage parking for four cars.”

You can see a virtual tour here.

This 6 bed/5.5 bath is going for $2,995,000.

26 Comment

  • It took me a while to figure out the kitchen. There seem to be two in one, and not sure why. My only thought is that for $3 million I’d like to have filtered water from the tap rather than having to lug around those big water bottles. (Not that I’m a contender for this house…)

    • It looks like an extra sink over in the family room part of the kitchen, with lots and lots of counter space all over. But otherwise not a bad kitchen at all!

      And I think your staff will do any water bottle lugging. But I agree, installing a filter on the tap is probably well within the means of anyone who buys this house.

    • They’re a kosher household, thus they have two ovens, two sink, and they need a ton of cabinet space to keep two sets of kitchenware & dishes.

      The menorah in picture #20 confirms that.

      [/Real Estate Sherlock Holmes}

      • 2 sinks, 2 ovens, but only 1 rangetop and 1 microwave… if it’s kosher, wouldn’t there also be 2 ranges/mwaves?

        I loved one of my ex’s mom: She was Modern Orthodox but the day I met her, we went out for a ‘get to know you’ lunch, and she ordered a bacon cheeseburger (“Doesn’t count if it’s not in my house” (wink wink, shhhhhh)).. and an ex who ate the bacon off my plate (“doesn’t count”)and one of my friends who is almost kosher, but adores shellfish…

        • I suppose they could have two rangetops and microwaves, but who knows? They might keep kosher 80% of the time but need an extra oven and sink for the 20% of the time they eat non-kosher foods.

          Similarly, I know a lot of people without even 1 microwave, as you can re-heat everything in the oven. So there’s not really a pressing need for two of them.

          But yeah, the degrees of “kosher” that some Jewish people keep are kinda hilarious. ;-)

          • I thought the extra ovens/sinks weren’t for non-kosher foods, but rather to keep things separate that can be eaten separately (beef, cheese) but not together. No?

          • Not Kosher. They just liked to entertain, and the 2 sinks made it much easier to work in the kitchen with multiple people. The 2nd oven was for cooking 2 things at the same time at different temps. Overall, a great house for entertaining.

          • Yes, you are correct. I should have been clearer in my explanation.

            Another way to get around having only one range is to have a portable hot plate, which can be stashed away in the cabinet after use.

            Either way, this is almost certainly a kosher kitchen which, I imagine, can either add value to the place (if the buyer also keeps kosher) or detracts value from the place (if the buyer is a Gentile and feel the need to remodel). Personally, I wouldn’t mind having an extra oven, especially during the holidays!

          • Cool, thanks for the update “Know the owners” :-)

          • Very cool house, but definitely not Kosher, I have eaten pork ribs on the kitchen counters. Great pool though!

        • A lot of Jews keep kosher (or semi-kosher) at home but not when eating out. It’s a way to honor and respect the tradition without leading a totally cloistered life. Because if you kept truly kosher (separation of all meat and dairy, all meat killed in kosher way, etc.), I don’t know that there are any restaurants in the DC metro area where you could eat, and you’d be pretty limited in whose house you could eat at.

          • Yea, I know, and I find it absolutely hilarious.

            If you keep kosher, you keep kosher. Otherwise you don’t. It ain’t supposed to be easy.

            I also laugh at people** who call themselves “vegetarian” when they eat fish.

            Own it and live it or stfu about it. (by ** I mean it amuses me, I do not mean I laugh in their faces or get into an argument over it).

          • Religious observance doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Religions and their observances are allowed to change to adapt to the times and the circumstances. See: The Reformation.

          • Anon 2:36 – if someone says they “keep kosher” and then eat a bacon cheeseburger… they don’t keep kosher.

            The rules of kashrut are not “take it or leave it” and they have not changed.

          • as long as it’s legal, i don’t really care how people describe how they eat.

            i tell people i’m vegetarian ( though i’m pescatarian) because thats how i prefer to eat, and it’s just easier to deal with.

            i don’t care if someone says they’re kosher and eats bacon. thats their thing, not mine.

          • I guess all of the Jews I know in that category say they “keep kosher at home” or “kosher-style” and don’t pretend they are keeping kosher 100% of the time. But as Anon 3:06 says, it’s their thing and not mine so I don’t get bent out of shape about it (sounds like you have the same approach, Identified).

            But clearly the way the laws of kashrut are observed IS changing, since we all seem to know some Jews who observe the laws under some circumstances but not all of them. I don’t know if any Rabbis have signed off on this plan, but in a sense that doesn’t matter for the evolution of observance.

          • There is no (rabbinical) change in the rules of kashrut (according to my kosher friends). And if they are not following the rules, then the ryules aren’t changing, they are not obserbving them. Difference.

            But yea, Anon 2:36 – I am amused, but I don’t care. I am amused at the language of it… but whatever people choose to do, if it doesn’t affect me, I sit back and smile. No worries.

  • I used to work with a Jew married to a Catholic. Asked how they worked out the differences, she said, “We celebrate all the holidays that involve giving presents.”

  • Yes, great house for entertaining–either formally at the front or informally at the back. On this scale, and at this price there needs to be two kitchen setups so the catering staff aren’t falling over each other.

  • For 3 million I want something other than a Victorian ice cream parlor light in the entrance hall. The decor, the kitchen, the price: Oy gevalt!

  • It’s for milk and meat. If you’re strictly kosher, you maintain 2 different sets of cookware, silverware, and I guess appliances, for dairy and meat. I don’t think it is for kosher and non-kosher.

  • This is a great house, classic Washington, DC. The pool totally caught me by surprise. Love the light filled breakfast area. I think this is definitely in the right range.

    FWIW, two sinks and two ovens are a plus, if you cook.

  • PDMtP

    Want. Can’t afford.

  • I know it’s the name of the feature, but asking if something over $1M is a “good deal” or not doesn’t compute… That said, nice house – exteriors are beautiful!

  • for 3 mil…i’d expect a house that is more attractive and updated regardless of location. it’s THREE MILLION dollars for god sakes!

  • i like these posts.
    can’t, nor will never be able to afford a million dollar house. still, i find it interesting and one of the reasons i like this site.

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