Taxi Rates Increasing to $2.16 per Mile Starting April 21st


Photo by PoPville flickr user AWard Tour

The Examiner reports:

“The DC Taxicab Commission on Wednesday raised the rate to $2.16 per mile, up from $1.50 per mile. It also increased the wait-time rates, which kick in any time the cab is going slower than 10 mph, to $25 per hour, up from $15 per hour.”

At least the $1 surcharge for extra passengers is being removed unless the taxi is a van…

41 Comment

  • These so called modernizations better not be too far behind. Tossers.

  • I don’t understand this: “It also increased the wait-time rates, which kick in any time the cab is going slower than 10 mph, to $25 per hour, up from $15 per hour.”

    Could someone please explain how this works. How is the cab waiting if it is going > 0 mph but <10 mph?

    • ah

      I think this is fairly typical–to compensate drivers for being stuck in traffic. Otherwise you’d never find a cab at rushhour because they wouldn’t want to not be paid to be stuck.

      • Thanks for your explanation, ah, that does make sense now. I just thought that the meter kept running, which is why sometimes people complained that a taxi would drive really slowly (even in non-rush-hour times) in order to up the fare between point A and point B.

  • Those credit card machines for fare payment seriously better not be far behind. Get modernized, DC cabbies and commission!

  • Sooo, the rate hikes take effect now, but the improvements begin….? Convenient.

  • They should’ve coupled the new service standards (upkeep, credit cards, gps, panic button, etc…) with this increase. So does this mean they won’t be clicking that ‘extra charges’ button without explanation?

    Does the ‘Fuel Surcharge’ still stick?

  • Yet, another reason not to take a cab.

  • I asked my boss to give me a raise today. I told him that I’m doing the same level of work I’ve been doing for years, but I want 44% more money to do it.

    He told me I should take on more responsibilities to deserve a raise. But after we spoke, he agreed to give me the raise, then think about giving me more responsibilities at some point in the future. Maybe.

  • Another reason why if a cabbie gets no more than a dollar tip from me.

  • Psmitty311

    I looked up the rates on the Taxicab Commission’s site (they’re still the old ones), but one thing I cannot find is an explanation of Rates 1, 2, and 3 – visible on the meter on the bottom right.

    I consistently catch cabs that show Rate 1 or Rate 2, and I’d like to know what the actual rules are. Any clues or links?

    • I asked recently and was told that 1 and 2 are now the same. They used to be used to distinguish travel that went outside DC but are now interchangable. 3 is emergency pricing.

      I don’t have any links to back this up, though; you’d hope with a system with so many complexities, the cab commission would do a better job of clearly explaining them, but that’s obviously expecting too much here. If someone does have a good link, that would be great to see.

    • Rate 1 used to be capped at $19 in city driving, rate 2 was for going outside the city (e.g. VA) and would allow trips over $19, rate 3 is for snow emergencies (I cant remember exact % multiplied of regular rates but think it is 25-50%).

      Then a few months ago they got rid of the $19 cap and decreed that all taxis should use rate 2 from now on.

      So, long story short, another increase in rates without the promised modernizations.

      I wonder how long until Chairman Swain does another sting in Uber cars. Corrupt jerkfaces (and that is the nice thing I want to say about him and DC Taxis association).

  • Uber must have a mole inside the taxi commission, because they are doing everything they possibly can to help Uber succeed in the DC market.

    A 40% increase in price? That nearly entirely makes up the price gap between Uber and DC cabs. And with Uber’s additional service features (gps tracking cars after dispatch, credit card on file, driver rating system) and comfort, why on earth do DC cabs want to make themselves this irrellevent?

    Of course, this also explains why they tried to crack down on Uber earlier this year. They knew the rate increase was promised and coming in a few months and they didn’t want a competitor gaining steam.

  • Wait it was a $1.50 per extra person and $1 fuel surcharge so which ine has been eliminated?

  • Solution: I’m begging DC to create a “black/gypsy cab” community. I’ve lived in London&NY and they rock. Why can’t we have a less corrupt alternative to the DC Cab commission? Raise fees w/ the technology of 1986, unexplained fees…. I just want to pay a fair amount to get to point A to B safely. I say bring on the black cabbies!

    • Don’t we sorta have that now with the people that hang out at the CH Giant and offer rides home? I seem to recall we had an interesting discussion about that a while ago.

  • Solution: I’m begging DC to create a “black/gypsy cab” community. I’ve lived in London&NY and they rock. Why can’t we have a less corrupt alternative to the DC Cab commission? Raise fees w/ the technology of 1986, unexplained fees…. I just want to pay a fair amount to get to point A to B safely. I say bring on the black cabbies!

  • Another good reason to get on your bike!

  • Yet I absolutely GUARAN-F’N-TEE that they still will refuse rides to people wanting to go anywhere beyond Ward 1. No institution or group of professionals raises my blood pressure and anger higher than DC cabbies.

  • I’m no Rand-worshiper, but this is what happens when governments establish and regulate a monopoly.

  • squish

    I heard they’re going to give out punch cards for a reward program, too. Everytime a cabbie verbally/physically abuses you, you a stamp–5th ride is free!

  • bfinpetworth

    That essentially solve my problem of choosing between Uber and a taxi. Case closed!

  • I take cabs in other cities but rarely do in DC. Now with this fare hike, Car2go just got a lot more attractive to me.

    Raising the price of cabs while holding quality constant will reduce the number of trips and also the cabbies’ income. Nice work, taxicab commission!

  • It’s unbelievable to me that they keep on extending the fuel surcharge. I drive from the Columbia Heights area to Tysons every day for work, and I don’t have my employer handing me extra money because gas has skyrocketed. Especially since I haven’t been working harder than usual.

  • Screw these guys. That’s an outrageous one-time fare hike.

    Say goodbye to 90% of the cab rides I usually take. You wanted more of my money? Guess what, now all of it stays in my pocket.

    Oh, and learn how to drive. Jackasses.

  • I read this post and signed up for Uber. I only take a taxi a few times per month. By my paper & pencil calculations, the Uber service will cost $2-3 more per trip for my normal taxi route of downtown to my home in Petworth. Should be worth it. Looking forward to trying Uber!

    • Uber’s pretty great. With the extra person charge, the phone order charge and the tip, I think Uber is now actually cheaper for me and my wife than a cab.

      Uber (and cabs, too, nowadays) are too pricy for everyday use for us, as an occasional user, I don’t think I’ll ever choose a DC cab over Uber. The only downside is that I absolutely despise the name.

  • figby

    I really, really hate those stupid, unwiedly vans.

    And this rate increase is totally unjustified.

  • I haven’t been inside a DC taxi in almost a year because I’m just fed up. I’ve walked. I even took Metro and the Circulator. And I’ve driven then paid for parking. But I have absolutely refused to give a DC cab another nickel of mine until they provide the level of service and safety we deserve. And I absolutely love you for rescuing us UBER!

  • Now my cab fare will cost more than most cabs in DC are worth. #walking

  • I just got in a screaming fight with yet another horrible dc cabbie who tried to charge me $2 for my small carryon bag in the back seat. Does anyone know what the actual rule is for “large bags in the trunk” ( as most thriving dc cabs just automatically add the charge even if the bag is neither large not in the trunk)

  • I just got in a screaming fight with yet another horrible dc cabbie who tried to charge me $2 for my small carryon bag in the back seat. Does anyone know what the actual rule is for “large bags in the trunk” ( as most thriving dc cabs just automatically add the charge even if the bag is neither large not in the trunk)

  • How do you know if they’re using the new rate or old rate so that you can know whether they should be charging the extra fuel/per-person charge?

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