24 Comment

  • I live three blocks from this house and pass it every day. It’s just sweet, how it sticks out (in a good way) from the rest of the houses in the neighborhood (it’s at 5th and G NE, so not technically Capitol Hill, but it might as well be).

    The guy who lives there (or his gardener) seems to work on his landscaping nearly every day, and it shows.

    • It’s Capitol Hill.

      • It’s not.


        The first clue: it doesn’t look like the rest of the rowhouses, as it is not subjected to the codes set forth by the historic district.

        Don’t get me wrong, it’s an awesome house, but I think most people in the Capitol Hill neighborhood would tell you it’s counter to what the neighborhood is striving for in terms of remaining a historic district.

        • Oh, for the love of all things holy.

        • Capitol Hill doesn’t stop where the historic district ends. Further, the Historic District is likely to expand sooner than later and will at that time encompass this address. This is only 1 block outside of the current historic district.

        • Also, that’s not an accurate map of the historic district. Not that it matters, b/c even CHRS will say that the Capitol Hill neighborhood extends beyond the Historic District. Here is the correct map, for your reference.


        • The argument over ‘is it Capitol Hill or not?’ is endless. The only objective answer is if you are referring specifically to the historic district, which has legally defined boundaries. However, the district doesn’t necessarily include the entire Hill neighborhood. The neighborhood boundaries are fluid and changeable over time – when I was in high school in the 1970s, it was commonly accepted among my classmates who lived on the Hill, that the Hill went no further east than 10th Street. Obviously that has changed. So, can we stop these endless discussions about the fringes? It is or isn’t, depending on whatever you want it to be, unless you’re talking about the actual, legally defined Historic District. (And really – if you’re going by what real estate agents tell you, the Hill goes all the way to the Shrimp Boat!)

      • Some people consider ‘Capitol Hill’ to stop where the historic district stops, most put the border at H St. Real Estate Agents will occasionally extend it father north than that.

        • I don’t think anyone should be guided by real estate agent opinions on neighborhood borders. According to all of the real estate agents and websites 10 years ago, my place ON Logan Circle was actually Dupont East. Snort. My friends, firmly situated in the Shaw neighborhood, were considered to be in Logan East until only a couple of years ago. Double snort.

          I think the H Street neighborhood has earned the right not to be lumped into Capitol Hill. And yes, one block away from H Street really should be considered part of the H Street neighborhood. Just my two cents.

          • That’s just silly. H Street is a commercial district, not a residential neighborhood. It’s like saying homes near Barrack’s Row are not part of Capitol Hill because they are near Barrack’s Row.

            Homes just south of H Street are clearly part of Capitol Hill. They do not differ in character or substance from homes immediately adjacent. It is one NEIGHBORHOOD.

  • i like the stucco.

  • I’m hardly ever moved to comment on House of the Day but this is gorgeous.

  • Has anyone here in Petworth stuccoed over their brick on the alley side of their house? I’ve considered doing it as both a good way to cut the heat in the summer (white or light stucco will reflect most of the sun, while brick soaks it up and radiates it back into the house) and to cover the no-longer-straight rows of bricks that have settled over the 80+ years my house has existed. It looks so much better than vinyl siding, but i wonder if it’s more difficult/pricey than it’s worth.

    • Sounds like a good idea. We discovered that the 100-year-old mortar between bricks had crumble in so many places on our house that it provided easy access to mice. So that would be an added benefit. Once we had the brick re-pointed, our mouse problem reduced to alsmot nothing (not much can be done to prevent them moving through shared walls with our neighbors).

      My only concern would be the strength of the wall holding up the stucco. These Wardmans are obviously well-built houses but stucco is heavy and everything has a breaking point.

  • Key to the City worthy.

  • I have a few fantasy houses where if I had enough money, I’d buy. This is one of them.

  • Love this house and that corner. He does an awesome job tending to his yard and the other houses on that G St corner do the same. It’s one of my very favorite spots in the neighborhood and somewhere I always enjoy passing when heading to Sidamo or Ethiopic.

  • I don’t think that is silly at all. Plenty of neighborhoods are named after or referred by the commercial districts they abut (like Eastern Market), geographic landmarks (Dupont Circle), or streets (Georgia Avenue), but that doesn’t mean they aren’t neighborhoods. Frankly, I’m not sure what a purely commercial district looks like in this area.

    Nor does your argument hold with respect to Barracks Row–which is clearly included within the Capitol Hill Historic District boudaries.

    I think the underlying thread on this discussion is that there really isn’t a perfect standard for defining neighborhood boundaries. The Historic District map is about the closest thing to an objective standard that exists, but if it is amended to include new sections of NE or SE then people can adjust their expectations accordingly. If you want to say that you live on Capitol Hill, and you live outside the Historic District, go right ahead. Personally, I think people who live in the very cool neighborhoods surrounding “Capitol Hill” should embrace their own particular neighborhoods.

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