Dear PoP – Plumber Rec and Reverse osmosis installation?

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“Dear PoP,

We are hoping to install a reverse osmosis water spout on our kitchen counter asap. I understand that I can just buy one at Costco, but installing it is something I don’t want to do on my own – a big reason being the granite countertop. I’ve looked around at the usual plumbing people, but no one says they do this sort of work. Any advice? I’d need someone who can drill a hole in the granite and set up the water line.”

Wow, I’ve never heard of this. Anyone ever have a reverse osmosis water spout installed? Also another reader requests good plumber recs if you have one?

10 Comment

  • Granite countertops are so common these days that you could probably find a plumber that would do it at the same time as the installation. Whether you want your plumber to be your stone worker as well is another story. Companies that install countertops will do it for a couple hundred, basically the cost of the service call, it’s not too complicated and they do it all the time. You can do it fairly easily by renting the right drill, but the cost of even a small mistake is high (replace the whole granite slab). You may need your plumber to mark the drill location and diameter unless you can get that from the water dispenser instructions. I would double check, you only get one shot to get this right.

  • Most of the under-counter reverse osmosis can be connected directly to your cold water tap without any decrease in pressure. So cold water is being filtered, hot is not, but no need for a new hole in the counter.

  • I’m not too familiar with these systems, but couldn’t the spout be installed through the sink (instead of drilling the granite)?

    • The reverse osmosis process is not instant; it takes time, and the osmosis’ed water is stored in a tank. I think the undersink GE one does something like 10 gallons a day. So using it for all cold water needs won’t work unless you use less than 10 gallons/24 hours – hence the individual spout.

      I installed a whole house filter that is specially designed for the chloramine treatment WASA uses. It is about 5 feet tall, 12-14″ in diameter, cost about $700, and is good for about 70,000 gallons. I hooked it into my supply line for everything except the toilets and outdoor faucets. The before/after difference (taste, smell, etc) was amazing – people frequently comment on how good the water tastes.

  • As far as plumber recs go, I had my main drain and a bathtub drain snaked out a couple of weeks ago. I used plumbline plumbers, and they were fast and appear to have done a good job, but it was very expensive. The total came to about $700.

  • John E. Barry Plumbing and Heating is the best outfit in town, and the do remodeling as well as plumbing. 202 842 2424. They have never let us down and we have used them extensively.

  • Ronnell James
    (202) 498-9864

    He is very efficient and reasonably priced.

  • I used the plumber our developer used and was not very impressed I just called one I saw a commercial for on TV and what a pleasure it was using Grayton Plumbing; I would definitely call them back if I needed something else. They come in – look at the job and give you an in writing estimate before they start the work. In our case they fixed the minor issue for a small amount of money but also let us know what our other options were and how much those would cost.

  • One more vote for John E. Barry. Stay away from Grayton. Very overpriced.

  • It is a relatively easy job to install the reverse osmosis filter/tank. I did it myself and installed the spout in the hole where we had a soap dispenser installed in the granite.

    The issue is the hole in the granite. Have a stone / masonry guy do it if you don’t want to replace your countertops.

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